CL311: Latin Prose Seminar
(The Age of Caesar)

IANVARY

Weds
1/ 23

IN CLASS: Introduction

FOR MONDAY:

  • "How to Read Latin Prose Effectively": list of rules from B. Dexter Hoyos, Latin: How to Read it Fluently
  • "Sallust," pp. 10-21 in Kraus & Woodman, Latin Historians (G&R New Surveys in the Classics 27: Oxford, 1997)
  • "Sallust's Style," pp. 10-14 in Ramsey, Sallust's Bellum Catilinae
  • BC (Bellum Catilinae) 1-5.8. Try to apply Hoyos's rules of Latin prose reading. Also, watch out for the peculiar aspects of Sallust's style described by Kraus & Woodman and Ramsey. If you really think something doesn't make sense, it may just be Sallustian asyndeton or inconcinnitas!

N.B. This is a sizable chunk of Latin from a fairly difficult author. A couple of suggestions for doing the Latin reading this weekend:

(1) Start early. I suggest doing the Latin readings tonight, and working on a quarter of the Latin readings on each of the remaining days, Thursday through Sunday.

(2) Don't spend too much time grappling with any one grammatical problem. If you've thought about a sentence for 5-10 minutes and it still doesn't make sense, move on. You can and should ask about it in class. Likewise, don't knock yourself out trying to locate the meaning of a single word; remember: Sallust has a penchant for unusual diction!

Mon
1/ 28

IN CLASS:

  • Overview of Roman History from 133 B.C. – 63B.C.
  • Translation and Discussion of Style

FOR WEDNESDAY:

  • BC 5.9-6

Weds
1/ 30

IN CLASS:

  • Translation

FOR MONDAY:

  • Read pp. 151-161 of the introduction to the Bellum Catilinae in Handford's Penguin translation. (This summarizes some of the historical topics we talked about on Monday.)
  • Also in the Penguin, read from the start of the last paragraph on p. 179 ("It was in this period....") to the end of the first paragraph on p. 181 ("...than seek vengeance"). Try not to be seduced into reading further in English.

When you read the English sections of Sallust, consider them closely. Especially in English, Sallust can sound like empty moralizing, but his old-school severitas is grounded in an orderly system of thought. What according to Sallust, is happening to Rome? What specifically are its greatest virtues, and how do these begin to mutate into vices? (The answer to these questions will become even clearer once you have begun to read the Latin assignment.)

  • BC 10-16. Continue to watch Sallust's style for characteristic quirks. We will obviously not be able to translate all of the Latin together. Instead, we will try reading through the Latin together – I will ask you to read it in class as expressively as you can – and we will then pause to translate, discuss the grammar, or talk over content.

FEBRVARY

Mon
2 / 4

IN CLASS:

  • Translation

FOR WEDNESDAY:

  • In the Penguin, read from the beginning of the second full sentence on p. 186 (“About the beginning of June, therefore….”) to p. 214.

As you read, note the roles played in the text by the following individuals and the ways in which they are portrayed. To what extent are they presented sympathetically? Unsympathetically? What about the optimates (the aristocracy) and the populares?

Pompey (Cn. Pompeius Magnus) M. Licinius Crassus L. Sergius Catilina
C. Iulius Caesar Q. Lutatius Catulus  
M. Porcus Cato M. Tullius Cicero  
  • Read Lily Ross Taylor, “Delivering the Vote” in Party Politics in the Age of Caesar (Berkeley, 1964) 50-75
  • Review verbs and verb usages.

Weds
2 / 6

IN CLASS:

  • Discussion of Sallust's narrative (in the context of Taylor's discussion of Roman elections).
  • Latin verb review.
  • Consideration/assignment of report topics.
  • Explanation of Written Assignment #1.
  • Translation/reading (if time).

FOR MONDAY:

  • BC 50-51. Pay attention to the style of Caesar's oration. Is Sallust trying to create a unique style for his "character," or does Caesar talk just like Sallust?
  • Written Assignment #1: Latin Syntax Analysis Exercise for BC 51.9-24. You can copy a Latin text of Sallust into Word from the Latin Library.

Mon
2 / 11

IN CLASS:

  • Written Assignment #1 due.
  • Further discussion of Sallust's narrative up to the debate on the execution of the conspirators.
  • Further Latin verb review.
  • Translation/reading of BC 50-51.

FOR WEDNESDAY:

  • read the Fourth Catilinarian

Weds
2 / 13

[CLASS CANCELLED DUE TO WEATHER]

FOR MONDAY: BC 52.

Mon
2 / 18

IN CLASS:

  • Presentation on Catilinarians I-IV (Hannah)
  • Reading and Discussion of the Speeches of Cicero and Cato
FOR WEDNESDAY: BC 53-55

Weds
2 / 20

IN CLASS: Latin Reading

FOR MONDAY:

1.) Finish reading the Bellum Catilinae in English

2.) Study for quiz on Sallust's Latin (20 mins.)

  • The Latin may be drawn from the following passages:
    BC
    1-2.6; 5; 10; 50; 53-54.4

Be prepared to:

  • translate the Latin as literally as good English permits
  • answer simple grammatical questions about the Latin
  • identify features of Sallust's style

Mon
2 / 25

IN CLASS: Quiz 1 (Sallust); Presentations on Sallust and Cicero (Jim) and Sallust and Caesar (Alex)

FOR WEDNESDAY:

  • read James M. May, "Cicero: His Life and Career" from Brill's Companion to Cicero: Oratory and Rhetoric (Leiden, 2002) pp. 1-22
  • read Cicero's Ad Fam. 5.7 (to Pompey)

Weds
2 / 27

IN CLASS: Presentation of Sallust as a Historian (Kelly); Reading of Ad Fam. 5.7

FOR MONDAY:

  • read pp. 12-17 ("The Letters") in Shackleton-Bailey
  • read Petrarch's Letter to Cicero (handout)
  • read Cicero's Ad. Att. 1.13.2-3 (#6 in Shackleton-Bailey): do sections 2-3 only!

MARCH

Mon
3 / 3

IN CLASS: Reading; Discussion of Letters and Cicero's Exile
FOR WEDNESDAY: be prepared to finish reading #6 in Shackleton-Bailey

Weds
3 / 5

IN CLASS: Reading; Explanation of Rome Game Rules and Assignment of Game Identities

FOR MONDAY AFTER BREAK:

  • read Ad Fam. 14.2 (#9 in Shackleton-Bailey)

Mon
3 / 10

and
Weds
3/12

FERIAE VERNALES (No Seminar)

Mon
3 / 17

IN CLASS:

  • Reading
  • Discussion of future report topics

FOR WEDNESDAY:

  • read Ad Fam. 7.5.1-2 (#20 in Shackleton-Bailey): do sections 1-2 only! think about the verbs in these sections; the peculiar forms should be familiar to you by now

Weds
3 / 19

IN CLASS:

  • First Round of Consular Elections
  • Reading
FOR MONDAY: read remaining sections of Ad Fam. 7.5.1-2 (#20 in Shackleton-Bailey)

Mon
3 / 24

IN CLASS: Reading

FOR WEDNESDAY: read Ad. Fam. 7.5.3 (still from #20 in Shackleton-Bailey)

Weds
3 / 26

IN CLASS:

  • Second Round of Consular Elections
  • Reading

FOR MONDAY:

  • Read Ad. Fam 15.6 (#29 in Shackleton-Bailey)
  • Begin reviewing letters of Cicero for Quiz #2 (Wednesday, April 2) Make sure you know vocabulary and grammar from the various grammar/vocabulary handouts (I-III, Conditionals, and i-stem Nouns)

    LINKS TO GRAMMAR/VOCAB HANDOUTS: I, II, III, Conditions, I-Stem Nouns

  • I strongly suggest beginning the English version of Caesar's Civil War (first two books due by April 7th)

Mon
3 / 31

IN CLASS:

  • Reading
  • Historical Overview

FOR WEDNESDAY:

  • read Ad Att. 7.4 (#32 in Shackleton-Bailey)

APRIL

Weds
4 / 2

IN CLASS:

  • Third Round of Consular Elections
  • Quiz #2 on Cicero's Letters: Translation and Grammar Questions

FOR MONDAY:

  • Read Books I-II (in English in the Penguin edition) of Caesar's Civil War
  • Written Assignment #2: Evaluation of Caesar's Civil War. Write between 1 and 3 double-spaced pages (or more if the fancy seizes you) on the first two books of Caesar's Bellum Civile, answering ONE of two following questions:
    • (1) How does Caesar use the B.C. I-II as political propaganda? How does he characterize himself, his aims, his supporters and his men in contrast to those of his enemies?
    • (2) In what ways are B.C. I-II effective as narrative, as storytelling? What techniques does Caesar use to sustain the reader's interest in the action? What does he add to a bare description of events to make them more exciting or interesting? Consider both details (offhand remarks by Caesar, digressions, speeches and dialogues, use of humor and/or allusion, addition of “local color,” etc.) and the way in which the "scenes" of the narrative are organized.
    Try to come up with 3-4 general answers to each of these two questions, and support each with examples. You don't need to quote at length: just refer to the appropriate events and cite a book and section number in parentheses.
  • You should begin reading (in Latin) the assignment for next Wednesday, B.C. III.1-10

 

 

IN CLASS:

  • Discussion of B.C. I-II; comparison with scenes from HBO's Rome.
  • Reading

FOR WEDNESDAY:

  • Read B.C. III.1-10

Weds
4 / 9

IN CLASS:

  • Fourth Round of Consular Elections
  • Reading and Discussion

FOR MONDAY:

  • Read B.C. III.11-19

Mon
4 / 14

IN CLASS:

  • Reading
  • Presentations by Nick (on Roman voting procedures) and Jim (on Caesar as literature)
FOR WEDNESDAY: (No additional Latin)

Weds
4 / 16

IN CLASS:

  • Fifth Round of Consular Elections
  • Presentations by Kelly (on non-Caesarian books of Bellum Civile) and Chris L. as C. Iulius Caesar
  • Reading

FOR MONDAY:

  • Read (in English) BC 3.20-84
  • Begin reading (in Latin) BC 3.85-99 and 102-104. This will be the Latin reading in Caesar for the rest of the semester. What we don't finish in class, we'll finish at our final get-together.
  • Begin reading the handout from Lucan's Bellum Civile pp. 3-9 (from Book I) and 157-182 (from Book VII). The selections from Book VI (pp. 140-154) are optional, and are only included in the handout because they contain some of the weirdest scenes in Latin literature, relating to witchcraft, the reanimation of the dead, and other unspeakably gruesome things.

FOR MONDAY, 4/28:

  • Written Assignment #3: The Civil War in Retrospect. Write an essay of 4-5 double-spaced pages (or more if the spirit moves you) on the selections from Lucan, answering the following questions:
    • (1) How does Lucan characterize causes of the civil war between Caesar and Pompey compare with the impressions you have received from our other readings in this class in Latin and English? What is Lucan's view of the war 100 years after the fact? Where do Lucan's sympathies lie?
    • (2) How is Lucan's description of the battle of Pharsalia similar to and different from Julius Caesar's? Most importantly, how does his characterization of the moods, emotions, and choices of the major figures compare to Caesar's portrayal in BC III?

      As with the last writing assignment, you should support your answers with examples. You don't need to quote at length: just refer to the appropriate events and cite line numbers (in the case of Lucan) or book and section numbers (for Caesar) or whatever is appropriate (section numbers if you cite Sallust's Bellum Catilinae, book and number for Cicero's letters, etc.)

Mon
4 / 21

IN CLASS:

  • Reading
  • Presentation (TBA)

FOR WEDNESDAY:

  • Continue Latin reading (see 4/16)

Weds
4 / 23

IN CLASS:

  • Sixth Round of Consular Elections
  • Presentation by Alex on Gnaeus Pompey
  • Reading

FOR MONDAY:

  • Continue Latin reading (see 4/16)

Mon
4 / 28

IN CLASS:

  • Reading
  • Presentations by Hannah on Clodius Pulcher and Chris on the Civil Wars
  • Discussion of Lucan's Bellum Civile

FOR MONDAY:

  • Continue Latin reading (see 4/16)

Thurs
5 / 1

IN CLASS:

  • Last Round of Consular Elections; determination of Rome Game victor
  • Finish Latin reading (see 4/16)
  • Presentation by Nick on the Battle of Pharsalus