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Structure for an Economics Paper 

I. INTRODUCTION

A. State your question.      

B. Explain why it is interesting.        

C. Give a guide for the rest of the paper: 

"In  section  2  I will provide a review of the  literature relating  to  this question. Section 3 looks more  closely  at... Section   4  addresses...  Section  5  provides  some concluding remarks."

II. LITERATURE REVIEW

A.  How  have other people answered your question,  or  one closely related?

"A  number  of authors have addressed question X.  One  can divide their ideas into three rough categories...."

III. YOUR CONTRIBUTION: WHAT DO YOU THINK THE ANSWER IS, AND WHY.

A.  Explain  why you agree or disagree with  the  arguments discussed in the literature review.

B. Present a theoretical model

C. Present new evidence.

a. Case Study

b. Empirical data

a. simple tables

b. regression analysis

IV. CONCLUSION

A. Briefly restate your question, your answer, and the main reasons for your answer.

B.  Does  your  answer have any relevance to debates  about government policy?

 


 

Essential items: 

*A  one-sentence, central question somewhere in the introduction, repeated in the conclusion. This has to be a real question,  with a  question mark at the end! Division into sections, with section headings (generally 4-6, including introduction and conclusion.)

Citation Style for an Economics Paper

Examples: 

At the end of the paper, alphabetically by last name, put:                              

References 

          Jones, A. S. (1984) "Pigs and Smells", The Journal  of  Pig Science, 12-3, 234-245.

          Smith,  L.  and Jones A.S. (1991) Pigs Who Smell  Too  Much  (Prentice-Hall: Englewood Cliffs, NJ)

Journals:  author(s),  (year),  "Article  Name",  Journal   Name, journal volume-journal number, page numbers---

Books: author(s), (year), Book Name (Publisher: City)

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