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Environmental Studies
 

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FALL 2010 COURSES

Courses for the new ES major (for Class of 2012 and beyond)
Courses for the old ES major (for Class of 2011)
Courses for the new ES minor (for Class of 2012 and beyond)
Courses for the old ES minor (for Class of 2011)
Special Topics Course Descriptions

Courses for the new ES Major (for Class of 2012 and beyond)

Social and Cultural Perspectives Track (for Class of 2012 and beyond)

Foundation Courses:

• ES 100 Environmental Concerns in Perspective

Core Courses:

• EN 229 Environmental Literature
• SO 223S Environmental Sociology

Cluster A Courses:

• AN 205 Mesoamerican Archaeology
• AN 231 Anthropology of Food
• AN 345 Ecological Anthropology
• EC 316 Economics of Development
• EN 229 Environmental Literature
• ES 221 Sustainable Development
• ES 351A Bicycling, Walking & Trails: Sustainable Mobility Solutions
• ES 351A Institutional Action on Climate Change in the U.S.
• GW 210 Ecofeminism, Women & the Environment
• IA 101 Introduction to International Affairs
• MB 351B Business and the Natural Environment
• SO 223S Environmental Sociology

Cluster B1 Courses:

• BI 115H Ecology of Food
• BI 140 Marine Biology
• BI 241 Ecology
• ES 205 Conservation and Use of Forested Landscapes
• ES 351B Urban Ecology
• GE 101 Earth Systems Science
• GE 208 Natural Resources
• GE 304 Geomorphology
• GE 309 Field Techniques

Capstone:

• ES 374 Environmental Studies: Methods and Approaches

Methods:

• EC 237 Statistical Methods
• MS 104 Introduction to Statistics
• SO 226 Social Research Analysis
• SO 227 Social Research Design

Environmental Science Track (for Class of 2012 and beyond)

Foundation Course:

• ES 100 Environmental Concerns in Perspective

Disciplinary Foundation Courses:

• BI 105 Biological Sciences I
• CH 105 Chemical Principles I
• CH 106 Chemical Principles II
• GE 101 Earth Systems Science

Core Courses:

• ES 205 Conservation and Use of Forested Landscapes

Cluster A Courses:

• AN 205 Mesoamerican Archaeology
• AN 231 Anthropology of Food
• AN 345 Ecological Anthropology
• EC 316 Economics of Development
• EN 229 Environmental Literature
• ES 221 Sustainable Development
• ES 351A Bicycling, Walking & Trails: Sustainable Mobility Solutions
• ES 351A Institutional Action on Climate Change in the U.S.
• GW 210 Ecofeminism, Women & the Environment
• IA 101 Introduction to International Affairs
• MB 351B Business and the Natural Environment
• SO 223S Environmental Sociology

Cluster B2 Courses:

• BI 241 Ecology
• BI 339 Plant Animal Interactions
• CH 221 Organic Chemistry
• ES 205 Conservation & Use of Forested Ecosystems
• ES 351B Urban Ecology
• GE 208 Natural Resources
• GE 304 Geomorphology
• GE 309 Field Techniques

Capstone:

• ES 374 Environmental Studies: Methods and Approaches

Methods:

• MS 104 Introduction to Statistics

Return to Top

Courses for the old ES Major (for Class of 2011)

Social and Cultural Perspectives Track (for Class of 2011)

Foundation Courses:

• ES 100 Environmental Concerns in Perspective

Cluster A Courses:

• AN 205 Mesoamerican Archaeology
• AN 231 Anthropology of Food
• EC 316 Economics of Development
• EN 229 Environmental Literature
• ES 351A Bicycling, Walking & Trails: Sustainable Mobility Solutions
• ES 351A Institutional Action on Climate Change in the U.S.
• GW 210 Ecofeminism, Women & the Environment
• IA 101 Introduction to International Affairs
• MB 351B Business and the Natural Environment
• SO 223S Environmental Sociology

Cluster B1 Courses:

• BI 115H Ecology of Food
• BI 140 Marine Biology
• BI 241 Ecology
• ES 205 Conservation and Use of Forested Landscapes
• ES 351B Urban Ecology
• GE 101 Earth Systems Science
• GE 208 Natural Resources
• GE 304 Geomorphology
• GE 309 Field Techniques

Cluster C Courses:

• AN 345 Ecological Anthropology
• ES 221 Sustainable Development

Note: The ES Program will consider counting one or more Cluster C courses toward your Cluster A requirements. Please consult your advisor and/or the Director of ES if you would like to make a request for substitution.

Capstone Course:

• ES 374 Environmental Studies: Methods and Approaches

Environmental Science Track (for Class of 2011)

Foundation Courses:

• ES 100 Environmental Concerns in Perspective

Core Courses:

• CH 105 Chemical Principles I
• CH 106 Chemical Principles II

Cluster A Courses:

• AN 205 Mesoamerican Archaeology
• AN 231 Anthropology of Food
• EC 316 Economics of Development
• EN 229 Environmental Literature
• ES 221 Sustainable Development
• ES 351A Bicycling, Walking & Trails: Sustainable Mobility Solutions
• ES 351A Institutional Action on Climate Change in the U.S.
• GW 210 Ecofeminism, Women & the Environment
• IA 101 Introduction to International Affairs
• MB 351B Business and the Natural Environment

Cluster B2 Courses:

• BI 241 Ecology
• BI 339 Plant Animal Interactions
• CH 221 Organic Chemistry
• ES 205 Conservation & Use of Forested Ecosystems
• ES 351B Urban Ecology
• GE 208 Natural Resources
• GE 304 Geomorphology
• GE 309 Field Techniques

Cluster C Courses:

• AN 345 Ecological Anthropology
• ES 221 Sustainable Development

Note: The ES Program will consider counting one or more Cluster C courses toward your Cluster A requirements. Please consult your advisor and/or the Director of ES if you would like to make a request for substitution.

Capstone:

• ES 375 Case Studies in Environmental Sustainability

Methods:

• MS 104 Introduction to Statistics

Return to Top

Courses for the new ES Minor (for Class of 2012 and beyond)

Social and Cultural Perspectives Track (for Class of 2012 and beyond)

Foundation Courses:

• ES 100 Environmental Concerns in Perspective

Cluster A Courses:

• AN 205 Mesoamerican Archaeology
• AN231 Anthropology of Food
• AN 345 Ecological Anthropology
• EC 316 Economics of Development
• EN 229 Environmental Literature
• ES 221 Sustainable Development
• ES 351A Bicycling, Walking & Trails: Sustainable Mobility Solutions
• ES 351A Institutional Action on Climate Change in the U.S.
• GW 210 Ecofeminism, Women & the Environment
• IA 101 Introduction to International Affairs
• MB 351B Business and the Natural Environment
• SO 223S Environmental Sociology

Cluster B1 Courses:

• BI 115H Ecology of Food
• BI 140 Marine Biology
• BI 241 Ecology
• ES 205 Conservation and Use of Forested Landscapes
• ES 351B Urban Ecology
• GE 101 Earth Systems Science
• GE 208 Natural Resources
• GE 304 Geomorphology
• GE 309 Field Techniques

Return to Top

Courses for the old ES Minor (for Class of 2011)

Foundation Courses:

• ES 100 Environmental Concerns in Perspective

Cluster A Courses:

• AN205 Mesoamerican Archaeology
• AN231 Anthropology of Food
• EC 316 Economics of Development
• EN 229 Environmental Literature
• ES 351A Bicycling, Walking & Trails: Sustainable Mobility Solutions
• ES 351A Institutional Action on Climate Change in the U.S.
• GW 210 Ecofeminism, Women & the Environment
• IA 101 Introduction to International Affairs
• MB 351B Business and the Natural Environment
• SO 223S Environmental Sociology

Cluster B1 Courses:

• BI 115H Ecology of Food
• BI 140 Marine Biology
• BI 241 Ecology
• ES 205 Conservation and Use of Forested Landscapes
• ES 351B Urban Ecology
• GE 101 Earth Systems Science
• GE 208 Natural Resources
• GE 304 Geomorphology
• GE 309 Field Techniques

Cluster C Courses:

• AN 345 Ecological Anthropology
• ES 221 Sustainable Development

Note: The ES Program will consider counting one or more Cluster C courses toward your Cluster A requirements. Please consult your advisor and/or the Director of ES if you would like to make a request for substitution.

Return to Top

Special Topics Course Descriptions:

ES 351A Bicycling, Walking & Trails: Sustainable Mobility Solutions
Instructor: J. Olson
To enable students to plan, design, implement and manage systems of non-motorized transportation, particularly the "human powered" modes of bicycling and walking. This course provides students with the professional skills necessary for meeting the changing needs of urban mobility, environment, health and economics. Bicycling and walking are already significant transportation modes in New York State, where more than 7% of commuter trips are made by pedestrians or bicyclists. Throughout the nation roads and trails of many types connect America’s culture, heritage and communities. The course provides an overview of relevant federal legislation as well as global and local trends which indicate the need for creating a more balanced system for all modes of transportation, including walking, bicycling, automobiles, transit and other alternatives. Opportunities for active participation in developing solutions at the community, regional and statewide level will be a part of the learning experience. Prereq. ES 100.

ES 351A Institutional Action on Climate Change in the U.S.
Instructor: K. Forbes
The 15th conference of the parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP15) did not produce a legally binding international agreement to address climate change. Yet, a variety of actions are being taken around the world. This course will cover actions currently being taken within the U.S. to mitigate climate change by civil society, different levels of government, and business. This course will provide students with a sufficient level of climate change literacy to consider and evaluate existing and emerging solutions. Students will learn to differentiate between solutions that have significant mitigation potential and those that only appear to do so. Besides lectures, the course will incorporate discussions, debates, and guest lectures. Prereq. ES 100.

ES 351B Urban Ecology
Instructor: C. Gibson
An examination of human and natural systems within a unified, interdisciplinary framework. This course will examine the drivers, pattern, process and feedbacks of urbanization. We will explore the consequences of urbanization on ecosystems within cities, the ecological dynamics of the city as an ecosystem, and the interplay of social and environmental systems. Course work will include discussions of primary literature, problem solving scenarios, and field research. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab weekly. Prerequisites: CH 106, BI 106, and GE 101, or permission of instructor.

MB 351B Business and the Natural Environment
Instructor: J. Kennelly
This case-based course aims to foster awareness, sensitivity and literacy concerning the major forces and challenges bearing upon the intersection of business organizations and the natural environment. It broadly examines and appraises the role of business enterprise in relation to the current (and future) state of the planet. The course begins by reviewing major ecological and socio-economic challenges facing the planet, including population growth, human poverty, climate change, toxic pollution, loss of biodiversity, etc, paying particular attention to the impacts of business enterprise upon each issue. The course then turns to an assessment of sustainable development and biophysically and socially sustainable business practices. The course concludes with a comprehensive assessment of various ways business may become a proactive force in an evolution to global sustainability. Prerequisites: MB 107, EC 103, 104, or permission of instructor.

 

 

 

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