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FALL 2011 COURSES

Courses for the ES Major: Social and Cultural Perspectives Track
Courses for the ES Major: Environmental Science Track
Courses for the ES Minor 
Special Topics Course Descriptions

Courses for the ES Major

Social and Cultural Perspectives Track

Foundation Courses :
•    ES 100 Environmental Concerns in Perspective

Core Courses
:

•    EC 104 001 Introduction to Microeconomics
•    EC 104 004 Introduction to Microeconomics
•    ES 221 Sustainable Development
•    GO 231 Environmental Politics and Policy

Cluster A Courses:

•    AM 103W Natural/Unnatural Disasters
•    AM 250A Regional Culture: Hudson River
•    AN 352C 001 The Earliest Cities
•    EC 104 001 Intro to Microeconomics
•    EC 104 004 Intro to Microeconomics
•    ES 221 Sustainable Development
•    ES 351A 001 The Politics and Sustainability of Food
•    ES 351A 002 Science, Power, and Global Environmental Governance
•    EX 131 Intro to Public Health
•    GO 231 Environmental Politics and Policy
•    GW 210 Ecofeminism, Women & the Environment
•    IA 101 Introduction to International Affairs

Cluster B1 Courses:

•    BI 115H Ecology of Food
•    BI 140 Marine Biology
•    BI 241 Ecology
•    ES 205 Conservation and Use of Forested Landscapes
•    GE 101 Earth Systems Science

Capstone:

•    ES 374 Environmental Studies: Methods and Approaches

Methods:

•    EC 237 Statistical Methods
•    ID 210 Introduction to GIS
•    MS 104 Introduction to Statistics
•    SO 226 Social Research Analysis

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Environmental Science Track 

Foundation Course :
•    ES 100 Environmental Concerns in Perspective

Disciplinary Foundation Courses:

•    BI 105 Biological Sciences I
•    CH 105 Chemical Principles I
•    CH 106 Chemical Principles II
•    GE 101 Earth Systems Science
•    CH 107H Intensive General Chemistry:Honors

Core Courses:

•    ES 205 Conservation and Use of Forested Landscapes

Cluster A Courses:

•    AM 103W Natural/UnnaturalDiasters
•    AM 250A Regional Culture: Hudson River
•    AN 352C 001 The Earliest Cities
•    EC 104 001 Intro to Microeconomics
•    EC 104 004 Intro to Microeconomics
•    ES 221 Sustainable Development
•    ES 351A 001 The Politics and Sustainability of Food
•    ES 351A 002 Science, Power, and Global Environmental Governance
•    EX 131 Intro to Public Health
•    GW 210 Ecofeminism, Women & the Environment
•    IA 101 Introduction to International Affairs

Cluster B2 Courses:

•    BI 241 Ecology
•    BI 338 Plant Biotechnology
•    CH 221 Organic Chemistry
•    ES 351B 001 Structure and Function in Human-Dominated Ecosystems
•    GE 216 Sedimentology
•    GE 311 Paleoclimatology
 
Capstone:

•    ES 374 Environmental Studies: Methods and Approaches

Methods:

•    EC 237 Statistical Methods
•    ID 210 Introduction to GIS
•    MS 104 Introduction to Statistics
•    SO 226 Statistics for the Social Sciences
•    SO 227 Social Research Methods

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Courses for the ES Minor 

Social and Cultural Perspectives Track 

Foundation Courses
 :

•   ES 100 Environmental Concerns in Perspective

Cluster A Courses:

•    AM 103W Natural/Unnatural Diasters
•    AM 250A Regional Culture: Hudson River
•    AN 352C 001 The Earliest Cities
•    EC 104 001 Introduction to Microeconomics
•    EC 104 004 Introduction to Microeconomics
•    ES 221 Sustainable Development
•    ES 351A 001 The Politics and Sustainability of Food
•    ES 351A 002 Science, Power, and Global Environmental Governance
•    EX 131 Intro to Public Health
•    GO 231 Environmental Politics and Policy
•    GW 210 Ecofeminism, Women & the Environment
•    IA 101 Introduction to International Affairs

Cluster B1 Courses:

•    BI 115H Ecology of Food
•    BI 140 Marine Biology
•    BI 241 Ecology
•    ES 205 Conservation and Use of Forested Landscapes
•    GE 101 Earth Systems Science

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Special Topics Course Descriptions: 

AN 352C 001 The Earliest Cities
Instructor: J. Ek

This course examines the concepts, theories, and methods archaeologists employ to understand urbanism in ancient state societies in diverse geographic settings. What was it like to walk down the streets and central precincts of ancient Teotihuacan, Uruk, or Harappa?  Were ancient Maya cities similar to the Khmer cities in Southeast Asia?  Do modern cities differ from the urban centers of ancient civilizations in fundamental ways? The archaeological study of ancient cities around the world is an exciting and controversial area of research encompassing a range of academic disciplines. Topics discussed in the course draw on theories and concepts of the role of urban centers in complex human societies from the fields of anthropology, archaeology, environmental studies, and urban studies.  Review of case studies from several well documented ancient states from around the globe will provide students with a framework to address central questions and concepts in the study of ancient urbanism, including: the development of the earliest nucleated centers; the economic, political, and social-ecological, role of cities in ancient states; patterns of growth and decline, the impact on human health and the environment; and dimensions of variability such as city size, planning, architecture, and spatial patterns. A major component of the course is a research project in which each student will choose a particular city to explore in greater depth through class discussion and written projects. Students will become familiar with the tools that environmental archaeologists use to study ancient cities, including settlement survey as well as new methods such as GIS analysis, interactive 3D digital modeling, and agent-based simulation. Prerequisite: AN-102 or permission of instructor.

ES 351A  001 The Politics and Sustainability of Food
Instructor:  N. Atalan-Helicke


Our world is in a food crisis. Rising food prices, diminishing grain reserves, and global climate change—with implications for agriculture, crop yields, and water resources—raise concerns about chronic hunger and vulnerability as well as the erosion of our natural resources. This course focuses on the political economy of food and importance of environment and geography to the production, distribution, and consumption of food. We will study why food is produced and consumed where it is, how food as a commodity connects members of different societies, and how it creates social and geopolitical inequalities. Ultimately, our goal is to understand the relationship between food abundance and food insecurity across different regions of the world.

Prerequisites: ES 100 or the permission of the instructor

ES 351A  002 Science, Power, and Global Environmental Governance
Instructor: N. Atalan-Helicke

Environmental politics often seem at odds with “rational” problem solving. In this course we will examine the role of various agents-- governments, scientific bodies, and non-governmental organizations--in environmental decision-making and in using science, law, economics, and ethics are used as political tools to create powerful representations of environmental problems or decisions over others. The course will examine international environmental case studies to understand how people make policy decisions about the environment according to three broad themes: 1) Access to environmental decisions: Who has access to decisions? 2) Scientific data and expertise: How are scientific data and uncertainty used globally to reach environmental decisions? 3) Perceptions: Why are some values translated into environmental decision making and others are not? The goal of the course is for students to gain an understanding of how certain environmental decisions dominate the public agenda and how certain policies gain legitimacy over others.

Prerequisites: ES 100 or the permission of the instructor


ES 351B 001 Structure and Function in Human-Dominated Ecosystems
Instructor:  C. Tant

This course will use the principles of ecosystem ecology and food web ecology to examine anthropogenic impacts and management on fluxes and stocks of elements (carbon, water, and nutrients) through both living and non-living components of ecological systems. Topics will include 1) factors affecting organic matter processing as they apply to various composting methods, 2) movement of nutrients, toxins, and emerging contaminants through food webs, 3) human impacts on trophic structure in food webs, and 4) modeling agricultural and aquacultural systems as highly controlled, extractive food webs. In each case, we will highlight the parallels and dissimilarities between the natural and altered systems. The course will emphasize critical examination of ideas and techniques through laboratory and fieldwork as well as group discussion. We will focus on themes from both the Social and Cultural Perspectives and Environmental Science tracks to guide group projects and discussions in the application of concepts to case studies from terrestrial, freshwater, and marine ecosystems.

Prerequisites: ES205 or ES206 or by permission of instructor.

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