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FALL 2014 COURSES

Courses for the ES Major: Social and Cultural Perspectives Track
Courses for the ES Major: Environmental Science Track
Courses for the ES Minor
Special Topics Course Descriptions

COURSES FOR THE ES MAJOR

SOCIAL AND CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES TRACK

Foundation Courses:

Core Courses:

Cluster A Courses:

Cluster B1 Courses:

Capstone:

Methods:

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ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE TRACK

Foundation Course:

Disciplinary Foundation Courses:

Core Courses:

Cluster A Courses:

Cluster B2 Courses:

Capstone:

Methods:

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COURSES FOR THE ES MINOR

Foundation Courses:

Cluster A Courses:

Cluster B1 Courses:

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SPECIAL TOPICS COURSE DESCRIPTIONS:

BI 352D Environmental Microbiology - Instructor: S. Franke McDevitt

A study of microorganisms in their natural environment. Students will learn about the ecology and diversity of microbial communities in soil, water, and air and the importance of microorganism in nutrient cycling in these environments. In addition we will look at the microbial communities in extreme environments. In the lab, students will learn techniques for sampling, culture, isolation and identification of microorganisms from these various environments. Additional topics include bioremediation, biofilm engineering, and other applications related to public health, agriculture, food science, and industry. Prerequisite: BI106, and one 200-level BI course or ES 205 or ES 206. Note: 3 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per week.

EN 229 Literature and the Environment: Muir, Leopold, and Berry - Instructor: M. Marx

"God never made an ugly landscape. All that the sun shines on is beautiful, so long as it is wild."—John Muir

“We abuse land because we regard it as a commodity belonging to us. When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect.”—Aldo Leopold

“When despair for the world grows in me and I wake in the night . . . I go and lie down where the wood drake rests in his beauty on the water, and the great heron feeds. I come into the peace of wild things.”---Wendell Berry

A deep passion for nature runs throughout the writings of John Muir, Aldo Leopold, and Wendell Berry.  Between the three, their writings span over a hundred years and extends from Yosemite and the Sierras to Sand County, Wisconsin and the farmlands of Kentucky.  This new version of “Literature and the Environment” provides an intensive study of these three leading figures in environmental writing.  We will focus on how these authors have translated their love into some of the most important literature about the environment over the past century.  We will analyze how they used their creative talents to describe the wilderness, argue for the conservation of the land, and analyze the newest challenges in agriculture and farming.  Readings range across genres and include personal and political essays, fiction, and poetry.  Course work includes three formal papers, short writings for the class blog, examinations, and oral presentations.

ES 221 Environmental Education - Instructor:  AJ. Schneller

Do you have a deep appreciation for environmental protection and a genuine concern about environmental problems that will affect the Earth and future generations for years to come? Maybe you also feel the need to share this positive passion for the environment with children, your friends, and interested members of the community? Then it's very possible that YOU should explore the field of environmental learning, and how to become an effective environmental educator! This course will especially be of interest to future teachers, non-formal environmental educators and advocates, and students interested in outreach, education, and communications for the non-profit and government sector. Students will learn about the history and current state of environmental learning in the US, as well as the various pedagogical tools, programs, and resources that are available for the global dissemination of environmental learning. We’ll explore the innovations and philosophies behind experiential and authentic environmental learning; sustainability education; research on environmental learning (knowledge, perceptions, attitudes, and behaviors); environmental service learning; earth education; emancipatory education; critical pedagogy; and issues investigation and action training (IIAT), etc. Students will research and critique existing environmental education programs as well as undertake a partnership with a local school, outdoor education center, National, State, or City Park, youth organization, hospital, non-profit organization, etc. in order to design and implement an age appropriate, innovative, and inspirational environmental learning unit. Students will be required to take one mid-term examination, take quizzes, as well as submit various written assignments.

ES 352D The Politics of Food, Agriculture and Social Justice - Instructor: N. Atalan Helicke

Our world is in a food crisis. Rising prices, diminishing grain reserves, and global climate change—with implications for agriculture, crop yields, and water resources—raise fears of chronic hunger, vulnerability, and the erosion of our natural resources. Starting with food production and agriculture, this course critically examines the global agro-food system, including the processing, transport, and marketing of food, and concludes with the politics of food consumption. We will focus on the problems with dominant forms of producing and distributing food, including the many environmental and social inequalities they produce, and what people are doing about them. Although most would agree that the problems with the food system are systemic and global in scale, and come from the way food is produced, current solutions tend to focus on creating alternatives on the local scale, privileging the needs and desires of consumers. Through case studies, the course will provide you an opportunity to think deeply about strategies how agro-food systems can promote social justice and environmental sustainability and whether current alternative solutions to the problems in the global agro-food system are adequate.   Prerequisites: ES 100 or the permission of the instructor. Requirements for this course include attendance and participation, food-related field trips/fieldwork, short writing assignments, and a research project.
 
MB 351B Business and the Natural Environment - Instructor: J. Kennelly

This case-based course aims to foster awareness, sensitivity and literacy concerning the major forces and challenges bearing upon the intersection of business organizations and the natural environment. It broadly examines and appraises the role of business enterprise in relation to the current (and future) state of the planet. The course begins by reviewing major ecological and socio-economic challenges facing the planet, including population growth, human poverty, climate change, toxic pollution, loss of biodiversity, etc, paying particular attention to the impacts of business enterprise upon each issue. The course then turns to an assessment of sustainable development and biophysically and socially sustainable business practices. The course concludes with a comprehensive assessment of various ways business may become a proactive force in an evolution to global sustainability. Prerequisites: MB 107, EC 103, 104, or permission of instructor.

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