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FALL 2017 COURSES

Courses for the Environmental Studies Major
Courses for the Environmental Science Major
Special Topics Course Descriptions

COURSES FOR THE ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES MAJOR

Foundation Courses:

Core Courses:

Cluster A Courses:

Methods:

Cluster B1 Courses:

Capstone:

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COURSES FOR THE ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE MAJOR

Foundation Course:

Core Courses:Cluster B2 Courses:

Cluster A Courses:

Capstone:

Methods:

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SPECIAL TOPICS COURSE DESCRIPTIONS:

ID-351C 001 Spatial Analysis and Modeling       Instructor: Tom Hart

This course provides an in-depth experience in applied spatial analysis. Topics will range from digital representations of  topographic features (e.g., natural and built ) and modeling thematic data (e.g., social, health and economic). Selected topics will allow students to become versed in advanced software applications including ArcMap extensions (e.g., spatial, 3D, geostatistical and network analysts) and specialized applications for watershed modeling and processing elevation data. Both remotely-sensed and vector-based data will be used. An additional focus on publishing methods and professional production will be included. As an interdisciplinary course, topics will be adjusted to match student backgrounds, with the opportunity to individually explore topics specific to their interests. Prerequisite: ID210 or other introductory GIS class with permission of the instructor

SO 351 Population Explosion in Sociological Perspective       Instructor: Amon Emeka

In this course we will consider arguments and evidence as to what triggered this “bomb,” whether we have seen the worst of its effects, and how it should bear on our thoughts and actions going forward. This means exploring patterns of birth, death, and geographic distribution of the human population and all attendant processes—including but not limited to family formation, sexual practices, neonatal care and practice, conceptions of childhood, parent-child relationships, disease transmission/control, disability, internal and international migration, segregation, etc.  The destructive potential of global warming, among other things, has made clear to us the inextricable links between human societies around the world and the need for interdisciplinary approaches to understand and, we hope, solve pressing problems that have taken on global dimensions.  Therefore, this course will necessarily have an international/comparative and interdisciplinary orientation. It is, however, a sociology class that will pay special attention to social forces that bear on demographic processes.

EX-361 Contemporary Issues in Public Health       Instructor: Suzanne D’Isabel

In Introduction to Public Health we examined the world of public health through a broad lens, but we did not have the opportunity to reach deeply in to any one topic area.  This course takes us to that next level by engaging in a thorough exploration of critically important public health topics. In particular, we will investigate how poverty impacts health, examine select global public health issues, study new and (re-)emerging infectious diseases, consider serious environmental public health concerns, and analyze the health behaviors that contribute most profoundly to prevalent chronic diseases. In addition, the course offers students the opportunity to bridge the classroom-community gap through independent projects with the Saratoga County Health Department. The goals of the class include for students to appreciate the unique aspects of each topic area, become conversant about important and timely public health issues, and apply public health techniques to address local public health problems.

BI 351.002  Ecology of North America

A survey across the continent of the major biomes and communities of plants and animals characterizing major sectors of the landscape. The course summarizes classical and recent studies of the biota of eastern deciduous forests, boreal forests, grasslands, deserts, and major aquatic systems from coast to coast, and includes baseline conditions and modern threats to these systems.  One full-day field trip required.

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