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Fall 2007 Courses

Attention all ES majors and minors: ID 210 Introduction to GIS is being offered in the spring and is strongly recommended for all ES students. There are also several new or special topics courses that do not appear on the master schedule list for ES. Please see the descriptions of these courses below. Finally, two sections of MS 104 Introduction to Statistics are being offered and will count in place of MS 104E for the Environmental Science track of the ES major. 

Social & Cultural Perspectives Track of the ES Major
Environmental Science Track of the ES Major
ES Minor 

Social & Cultural Perspectives track of the ES major

Foundation Courses:

Cluster A:

Cluster B1:

Cluster C:

Capstone:

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Environmental Science track of the ES major

Foundation Courses:

Core:

Cluster A:

Cluster B2:

Cluster C:

Capstone:

Other:

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ES Minor

Foundation Course:

Cluster A:

Cluster B1:

Cluster C:

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Course descriptions

AN 251C Archeology of North America – Instructor: Susan Bender

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the historical depth and variety of cultures that characterized human settlement in North America prior to Columbus’ “discovery” of it. In studying this topic, we will develop an explicitly ecological framework in which we will analyze how various environmental settings influenced humans’ initial migration into North America and their subsequent development of regionally diverse cultures. We will pay especially close attention to specific environmental constraints and opportunities that interacted with various technological capabilities to shape the culture histories of each major region or “culture area” of North America. Though data revealing human impact on paleoenviroments are sparse, we will consider these as part of human-land interactions in ancient America, as well. We will use this perspective to help us formulate a number of seminal cross-regional comparisons about native settlements in North America.


AN 351 Primate Conservation – Instructor: Chris Grassi

Most non-human primate species live in developing countries in the tropics which suffer from high population growth rates and dwindling natural resources. The non-human primates are threatened with habitat disturbance, hunting, and black market trading, as well as global warming. Many of the human populations live in poverty. This course will examine the causes and consequences of the threats to primate species' survival as well as the long-standing relationships between human and non-human primates: how they have interacted, and how this has lead to the endangered status of some or may help preserve other primate species. This course will explore different strategies for protecting primates and their habitats such as cultural practices, special reserves and national parks, research programs, public education, and eco-tourism.

ES 351 Urban Ecology – Instructor: Cathy Gibson:

An examination of human and natural systems within a unified, interdisciplinary framework. This course will examine the drivers, pattern, process and feedbacks of urbanization. We will explore the consequences of urbanization on ecosystems within cities, the ecological dynamics of the city as an ecosystem, and the interplay of social and environmental systems. Course work will include discussions of primary literature, problem solving scenarios, and field research. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab weekly. Prerequisites: CH 112, BI 240, and GE 207, or permission of instructor.

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