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Fall 2008 Courses

Attention Class of 2009: To fulfill the ES major requirements for both tracks, you must take ES 374 Senior Seminar in Environmental Studies during the Fall 2008 semester. This course is not required for the ES minor.

Attention Class of 2010: ES 367/368 Junior Seminar is being replaced by ES 374 Senior Seminar in Environmental Studies and will no longer be offered. This course will be waived from your requirements.

Attention All ES Majors & Minors: ID 210 Introduction to GIS is being offered in the fall and is strongly recommended for all ES students. Finally, two sections of MS 104 Introduction to Statistics are being offered and will count in place of MS 104E for the Environmental Science track of the ES major.
There are also several new or special topics courses that do not appear on the master schedule list for ES.

Please see the descriptions of these courses below:

Social & Cultural Perspectives Track of the ES Major
Environmental Science Track of the ES Major
ES Minor
Special Topics Course Descriptions 

Social & Cultural Perspectives track of the ES major

Foundation Courses:

Cluster A:

Cluster B1:

Cluster C:

Capstone:

Other/Methods:

These do not count for the major at present, but are highly recommended.

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Environmental Science track of the ES major

Foundation Courses:

Core:

Cluster A:

Cluster B2:

Cluster C:

Capstone:

Other/Methods:

These do not count for the major at present, but are highly recommended.

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ES Minor

Foundation Course:

Cluster A:

Cluster B1:

Cluster C:

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Special Topics Course Descriptions

AN 351 Primate Conservation – Instructor: Chris Grassi

Most non-human primate species live in developing countries in the tropics which suffer from high population growth rates and dwindling natural resources. The non-human primates are threatened with habitat disturbance, hunting, and black market trading, as well as global warming. Many of the human populations live in poverty. This course will examine the causes and consequences of the threats to primate species' survival as well as the long-standing relationships between human and non-human primates: how they have interacted, and how this has lead to the endangered status of some or may help preserve other primate species. This course will explore different strategies for protecting primates and their habitats such as cultural practices, special reserves and national parks, research programs, public education, and eco-tourism. Permission of instructor is required.

ES 351 Restoration Ecology – Instructor: Cathy Gibson

Ecological restoration is an intentional activity that initiates or accelerates the recovery of an ecosystem with respect to its health, integrity and sustainability. This course explores the newly emerging science of restoration ecology through its theoretical foundations and applications. We will review the conceptual bases of restoration ecology (succession, recruitment, landscape scale phenomena). In addition, we will address complex problems in restoration (genetics, physical barriers, exotic species, hydrologic regimes). Course work will focus on student centered presentations and analyses of case studies and recent literature. In addition, the course will involve a service-learning project at a local park.

Pre-requisites are environmental biology and environmental geology or permission of instructor.

GE 251 Glacial Geology – Instructor: Brian Bird

A course investigating glacial dynamics, erosion, deposition, and interaction with the landscape. Study will include analysis and interpretation of glacial sediments, sequences, and landforms. Aggregate resources, aquifer formation and vulnerability, as well as land use issues will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on the glaciation of New York State and the Great Lakes region during the Quaternary. Three hours of lecture per week. Required field trip. Brian Bird

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