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Environmental Studies and Sciences
 

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SPRING 2018 COURSES

Courses for the Environmental Studies Major
Courses for the Environmental Science Major
Courses for the ESS Minor
Special Topics Course Descriptions

COURSES FOR THE ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES MAJOR

Foundation Courses

Core Courses

Cluster A Courses

Cluster B1 Courses

Capstone

Methods

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COURSES FOR THE ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE MAJOR

Foundation Course

Disciplinary Foundation Courses

Note: We are waiving BI 106 for majors.

Core Courses:

Cluster A Courses

Cluster B2 Courses

Capstone

Methods

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COURSES FOR THE ESS MINOR

Foundation Courses

Cluster A Courses

Cluster B1 Courses

Cluster B2 Courses

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SPECIAL TOPICS COURSE DESCRIPTIONS:

EC 243 - Environmental and Resource Economics    Instructor: S. Goff

Analysis of contemporary environmental and resource problems (e.g., air, water, noise and aesthetic pollution, extinction of animal and plant species) through the use of economic theories and techniques of evaluation. Environmental policies dealing with these problems will also be considered.
PrerequisitesEC 104  and EC 237, MS 104, or SO 226

ES 252D Environmental Planning and Design      Instructor:  T. Hart

This course explores environmental planning, the process of applying environmental science to the protection of ecological values in the context of human uses. Students will learn about the history of planning from an environmental perspective, and how considerations of environmental health, natural resources and natural hazards are integrated into the planning process. Examples of outcomes include using environmental planning and ecosystem-based management to produce measurable results relating to ecological resiliency, preservation of ecological functions, managing sustainable working landscapes, and guiding development in the built environment. The course will consider global, national, state, regional, and local geographies with case studies focusing how local government decisions translate to protection or conservation of ecosystem-based values.
Prerequisite: ES 105

GE-251D Common Ground: Geology and Art        Instructor: J. Cholnoky

This course will explore the intersection between geosciences and visual art. Fundamentals of physical geology will be considered in this context using three themes – earth materials as media, earth (landscape) as subject, and earth as canvas.  Students will develop their observational skills and their abilities to describe, record, and understand the natural world. We will consider how art is used to convey scientific knowledge, to contextualize vast spans of time and space, and to examine connections between people and the land through a variety of readings, activities, and field trips (including one required full-day trip).
Prerequisite: One 100-level Geosciences course or permission of the instructor.

WLL 263B  Green Italy: Gardens, Food, and Material Culture  Instructor: S. Smith

In this course students explore the relationship between green space, resources and esthetics in Italian culture from the Renaissance to the present. They consider how these elements concern food (its production, preparation and consumption). Each thematic grouping has an experiential component. For example, students study the Italian garden in history and literature; subsequently we visit Congress Park and Yaddo in Saratoga. The Italian market place is reflected in Arcimboldo’s portrait paintings of seasons (16th century). The hands-on component is a visit to the local farmers’ market; it is followed by preparation of a meal in the test kitchen. Material culture is a constant theme. The study of Italian orchards, vineyards, olive groves and fields of wheat evolves into a view of food gathering. After discussing durum wheat, the class meets in the test kitchen to make bread. Hand and mind combine in this course to explore the connections between the natural aspects of food production (e.g., Mediterranean climate, hydrogeological risk) and the social aspects of food consumption (e.g., food culture). It also raises critical questions about sustainability of the food system through a discussion of the industrialization of food production and alternative food movements like Slow Food in Italy.

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