Faculty  Majors   Minors   Courses  Honors
Gender Studies

Fall 2011 Course Offerings

 
GW101 Introduction to Gender Studies Pat  Ferraioli
GW210 Eco-feminism, Women, and the Environment Mary Stange
GW375 Senior Seminar Mary Stange
EN223 Women and Literature Barbara Black
EN229 Special Studies: Text in Context Love in the Novel Phil  Boshoff
EN363 Special Studies in Literary History: Jane Austen, Inc. Catherine Golden
EN363 Special Studies in Literary History: Queer Theory Holly Jackson
FS376 Seminar: Word of Mouth: Literature and Food Viviana Rangil
GO353 Sex and Power Pat Ferraioli
SO203 Femininities and Masculinities Kim Tauches
SO217 Families in the United States Jessica Singer
SO251 Special Topics in Sociology: Sociology of Sexualities Debbie Warnock
SO333 Sociology of the Body Kristie Ford

GW 101 - Introduction to Women's Studies (4)

An introduction to the origins, purpose, subject matters, and methods ofthe interdisciplinary study of gender. Students are expected to expand their knowledge of the relative historical and present social conditions of women and men in different contexts and to develop analytical skills for the examination of socially significant variablesrace, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality. Students will explore different and often opposing understandings of what constitutes feminism and feminist action. The class format will combine interactive lectures, reading assignments, discussion, formal research and writing assignments and other student projects. Ideally, students will leave the class with an understanding of how gender structures cultural, political, economic, and social relations in various contexts.

GW 210 - Ecofeminism, Women, and the Environment (3)

An interdisciplinary exploration of the complex relationship between feminist theory and praxis, and environmental philosophy and activism. Using the idea of 'ecofeminism' as its unifying focus, the course examines such national and global issues as deforestation, overpopulation, species extinction, bioregionalism, environmental pollution, habitat loss, development, and agribusiness. Representative perspectives include those based in deep ecology, social ecology, animal and nature rights, human ecology, earth-based spiritualities, 'wise use,' the 'land ethic,' conservation, and wildlife management.

GW 375 - Senior Seminar in Gender Studies (4)

Exploration of primary and secondary sources in the interdisciplinary examination of a particular theme or topic in gender studies. The focus is on advanced research, and close attention is paid to the development, organization, and production of a major project. Students will present their research to the seminar; those intending to write an honors thesis will present their thesis proposals.
Prerequisites GW 101  and GW 201 .

EN 223 - Women and Literature (3)

An introduction to the study of women and literature, with particular attention to the various ways literary works have helped construct and also question differences between femininity and masculinity. Matters considered include defining basic terms (character, plot, genre, author, sex, gender) and exploring the relations among those terms.  (Fulfills humanities requirement.)

EN 229 - Special Studies: Text in Context - Love in the Novel (3)

Introduction to a selected topic in literature and/or language, with an emphasis on the relation between text and context. May be repeated with a different topic. (Fulfills humanities requirement) 

EN 363 - Special Studies in Literary History: Jane Austen, Inc. (3)

Studies in one or two authors of the British and American traditions, or in a specific literary topic, genre, or question in literary history or theory.  Prerequisites Completion of the Introductory Requirement.

EN 363 - Special Studies in Literary History: Queer Theory. (3)

Studies in one or two authors of the British and American traditions, or in a specific literary topic, genre, or question in literary history or theory.  Prerequisites Completion of the Introductory Requirement.

FS 376 - Seminar: Word of Mouth: Literature and Food (3)

A detailed study of an author, a period, or theme relevant to the understanding of Spanish and Spanish- American literature and culture with special attention to the essay. Frequent oral reports. Close attention to development, organization, and writing of an extensive paper. Prerequisites Senior status.  

GO 353 - Sex and Power (4)

Examines changing patterns in the regulation of sex, sexuality, and representations of sex and sexuality under constitutional and statute law in the United States. Attention will be focused on how these regulations support or challenge power relationships. Students will participate in a moot court.  Prerequisites GO 101  or permission of instructor.  

SO 203 - Femininities and Masculinities (3)

An analysis of gender in contemporary social life. By examining the intersections between race, ethnicity, class, sexuality and age, this course explores how differing types of femininities and masculinities are constructed, reinforced and maintained in U.S. culture and society. Dating and relationships, body image and appearance, and institutional inequities are among the topics examined.
(Fulfills social sciences requirement.)  

SO 217 - Families in the United States (3)

An analysis of families as social institutions, sites of interaction, and sources of identity. Family life courses, roles and relationships, and intersections between work and family are among the topics examined.Prerequisites one gateway course (SO 101 or SO 201 or SO 202 or SO 203 or SO 204, or GW 101 .)  

SO 251 - Special Topics in Sociology: Sociology of Sexualities (3)

An examination at the intermediate level of special topics, methods, and areas in sociology, such as population dynamics, collective behavior, juvenile justice system, and social control. Specific topics to vary by instructor and semester.Prerequisites one sociology gateway course (SO 101 or SO 201 or SO 202 or SO 203 or SO 204). The course, in a different subject area, may be repeated for credit.

SO 333 - Sociology of the Body (3)

Analysis of the body in contemporary social life. What do bodies tell us about ourselves, about others?  How do we feel in and about our bodies? Using sociological theory and qualitative research methodologies, students explore these questions by examining how the body is constructed and manipulated within social interactions and relationships. Bodily adornment practices (e.g., hairstyle choice, tattooing, exercise routines), bodily (dis)ability, and the medicalization of the body are among the topics examined. Prerequisites one sociology gateway course (SO 101 or 201 or 202 or 203 or 204) and SO 227, and one additional sociology course.

 * Course numbers, descriptions, and instructors refer to the information relevant to the catalog governing the academic semester, and are subject to change. Refer to the Skidmore Catalog for up to date information about academic courses.

 

 

 

 

 

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