Faculty   Minors   Courses
Latin American & Latinx Studies
 

Spring 2009 Courses

Latin American Credit
 
FS 208 WRITING IN SPANISH, 4 cr.
            Section 001: (F, 9:05-10:00 & TuTh, 9:40-11:00), G. Burton
            Section 002: (M, 11:15-12:10 & TuTh, 11:10-12:30), M. Lander
            Section 003: (F, 12:20-1:40 & M, 12:20-1:15), C. Grant

FS 212 SPANISH AMERICAN LITERATURE, 4 cr. (M, 12:20-1:15 & TuTh, 12:40-2:00), B. Loyola 
A study of the main currents of Spanish American literature from Colonial times to the present.  Such authors as Sor Juana, Gallegos, Darlo, Carpentier, Mistral, Neruda Paz, and Cortázar will be studied.

FS 220 LANGUAGE ACROSS the CURRICULUM: Spanish, 1 cr, M. Lander
A course designed for students who want to use their Spanish language skills in any course taught in English at the college. 

FS 301: BUSINESS SPANISH, 4 cr. (M, 9:05-10 & Th, 9:40-11:00), C. Grant 
An introduction to business and business institutions in the Hispanic world.

FS 319: SPANISH-AMERICAN NARR: GABRIEL GARCIA MARQUEZ 3 cr (TuTh, 2:10-3:30), M. Lander 
Students will make an in-depth study of the leading contemporary Spanish-American novelist and Nobel Prize winner, reflecting on his development as a writer and the impact this Colombian writer has had on Latin American literature.  Emphasis will be placed on an examination of Garcia Marquez as a novelist of the Caribbean and the creator of a particular literary world that has had an overwhelming influence on his contemporaries and the younger generations that followed. Readings include One Hundred Years of Solitude and also short novels and short stories.

FS 324B: SPANISH AMERICAN and LATINO FILM, 3 cr. (WF, 12:20-1:40), V. Rangil
A study of films produced and directed by Spanish, Spanish American, and Latino filmmakers. Students will learn about film theory and cinematographic techniques, and will analyze the specific social, cultural, and historical thematic of the films. In readings and discussions, students will address cultural differences, gender studies, and aesthetic concepts.

GO 209 LATIN AMERICAN PUZZLE, 4 cr. (MWF, 11:15-12:10 & 4th cr TBA), A. Vacs 
A comprehensive analysis of Latin American political, social, and economic processes and institutions from a multidisciplinary perspective. The course examines Latin America's political development, ethnic problems, gender roles, and economic strategies as well as the changing role of institutions such as the state, socioeconomic organizations, the church, and the military. It considers how Latin American societies changed after independence while noting those political, social, and economic aspects that remain unchanged.

HI 111:  INTRO TO LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY, 3 cr.(TuTh, 2:10-3:30), J. Dym
An introduction to the economic, political, social, and intellectual history of Latin America. Organized thematically and chronologically, topics emphasize understanding the emergence of European colonies into a group of distinct nation-states. Students will explore Latin American society from initial encounters among Europeans, Africans, and Native Americans, through independence and political, economic, and social challenges of early nation-state formation. We conclude with the twentieth century, addressing topics such as industrialization, revolution, U.S.-Latin American relations, and selected intellectual trends.

HI 330B POLITICS/SOCIETY IN LAT AM: CENTRAL AMERICA, 3 cr.(Tu, 6:00-9:00), J. Dym
Explores Central American politics and society from the colonial period, with emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.  Topics may include, internal and external challenges, revolutionary movements, economic development ( "banana republics"), and interactions among native American, African, and European peoples and institutions.

 PARTIAL LATIN AMERICAN CONTENT

AM 236 JAZZ: A MULTICULTURAL EXPRESSION,  4 cr. (TUTH, 5:00-6:20), L. Rosengarten

GO 367 IMMIGRATION POLITICS AND POLICY, 4 cr. (TuTh, 9:40-11), R. Turner
Americais in the midst of an immigration boom that rivals that of the early 1900s.  This class will examine these issues from an interdisciplinary perspective incorporating readings from economics, sociology, demography, and political science as well as the depiction of immigration in popular culture.  Topics include:  push and pull theories of immigration, demographic trends, the historical evolution of American immigration policy, the economic costs and benefits of immigration, the assimilation of recent immigration, state responses to immigration, and the role of economic and family criteria in shaping US immigration policy.

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