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Skidmore in Paris

Other subjects available

The following is a historical sampling of possible elective courses available to Arts & Business students at some of Skidmore's partner institutions in Paris that offer coursework in English. All courses require department chair approval and may only count as general elective credit. This list should be used as a guide. Course numbers listed are not guaranteed. Courses listed are not guaranteed to be offered during your semester in Paris.

Actual elective course offerings will vary each semester depending on what is available through the local universities and students' academic needs. Final course selections and enrollment will take place in Paris at the beginning of the semester, and are based on instructor availability, university course offerings, and student need. All courses are taught in English unless otherwise indicated. This list is subject to change.

Institut de Langue et de Culture Française (ILCF) at l'Institut Catholique de Paris

POLITICS AND THE ECONOMY IN FRANCE AND EUROPE TODAY
(ICLF - Institut de Langue et de Culture Française)

The main objective of this course is to give students grouding in how the French political and economic systems function so as to better understand the peculiarities of the French system, in particular, the importance of Republican values. In addition, sutdnest will discover different aspects of liefe in European Countries in a comparative context. Upon successful completion of the course, students will have acquired the basic knowledge necessary of French institutions and economy as well as other areas of French social life to be able to understand and explain the important issues that France is faced with today.

CONTEMPORARY FRENCH CINEMA
(ICLF - Institut de Langue et de Culture Française)

This course will explore four original aspects of contemporary French cinema: auteurism (theory of the filmmaker as an author), feminist cinema, postcolonial cinema, and the French comedy. Students will learn how to read a filmic text with accurate analysis tolls and will discover current social and political issues of French society through one of its favorite mediums: film. Since its invention by the Lumière brothers, Cinema has always been regarded in France as a major artistic expression. Intellectual, sophisticated and stylish, contemporary French cinema can also be simple, sensual, and…fun!

THE EUROPEAN UNION TODAY
(ICLF - Institut de Langue et de Culture Française)

Objectives:
Program:
FRENCH PHILOSOPHY THROUGH THE 17th – 20th CENTURIES
(ICLF - Institut de Langue et de Culture Française)

The course is conceived as a survey. It is intended for students who have limited or little knowledge of French philosophy. It will therefore provide a first insight to the major authors of the modern and contemporary French period from Descartes to René Girard. The second objective of the course is to help the students to enlarge their philosophical understanding on topics as diverse as: knowledge and human mind, society and law, rationalism and metaphysics, relationship with others, violence and sacrifice.

FRENCH FASHION FROM THE MIDDLE AGES TO THE 20TH CENTURY
(ICLF - Institut de Langue et de Culture Française)

Programme:

American Business School

POPULAR LITERATURE: ART (AND LIES) IN PARIS
(American Business School)

Students will make short presentations and discuss the social and aesthetic questions implicit in how these "pop lit" authors combine history, biography, art, and fiction. How, for example, can readers distinguish a documented life from wholly invented episodes? What are the consequences of making a story center on documents and diaries that don't even exist? In other words, do authors of this popular genre have obligations to their characters, to their readers, or to the religious, artistic, and secular institutions whose histories they take huge liberties with? Other issues include the ethics of inventing biography when almost nothing is known about the individual and of embellishing the few biographical details that are known. More technically, what interpretations do readers make because of the accompanying materials (forewords, timelines, notes, pictures, blurbs, bibliographies) that change from one edition to the next? Which edition are you reading, and how does it influence your judgments about the art, the history, the biographies, the fiction, and the "lies"?

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
(American Business School)

Basic concepts and processes of world politics will be illustrated through the analysis of power rivalries, competing images and ideologies and transformation of world economic relations. Students should acquire a basic understanding of the nation state system, power relationships, the balance of power, and of political and economic relations among nations so that they will be more aware and informed as world citizens.

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