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Syllabus

Fall Semester Prof. Hoffmann
2005
GOVERNMENT 103

Texts: Kesselman, Krieger, et. al., Introduction to Comparative Politics
Andrew Heywood, Political Ideologies, An Introduction
Robert Kennedy, Thirteen Days
Bob Woodward, Plan of Attack

Topics

Basic Assignments:

Section I. DEMOCRACIES: HOW THEY WORK
(Comparative Politics)

Sept. 8-20 Democracies: Parliamentary and Presidential (U.K. and U.S)

Kesselman, Krieger, et. al., Intro. To Comparative Politics, pp. 27-39, 49-
78 (British system), 297-343 (American system),

Articles assigned from newspapers, magazines, etc.

Section II. THE DOMINANT DEMOCRATIC IDEOLOGIES
(Political Philosophies)

Sept. 22- Democratic Socialism versus Liberalism, British Conservatism vs.
Oct. 4 American

Heywood, Political Ideologies, pp. 25-58 (Liberalism), 105-124, 135-154
(Democratic Socialism), 69-104 (Conservatism).

Articles assigned from newspapers, magazines, etc.

Take Home Exam on Sections I and II - - - - - Exact due date to be announced a week earlier

Section III DICTATORSHIPS: POST-COMMUNIST AND ISLAMISM (CHINA
AND IRAN)

Oct. 6-18 How 21st China is and is not Communist, How Iran is and is not Nazi

Kesselman, Krieger, pp. 619-669 (China), 571-617 (Iran).

Articles assigned from newspapers, magazines, etc.

Section IV THE DOMINANT DICTATORIAL IDEOLOGIES
(More Political Philosophies)

Nov. 3-15 Justifications for Dictatorship

Heywood, pp.125-139 (Communism), 214-239 (Fascism/Nazism),
292-318 (Religious Fundamentalism)

Second take home exam on Sections III and IV - - - - - Exact due date to be announced a week earlier

Section V. UNDERSTANDING INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
(World Politics)

Nov. 17 - The Very Big Picture
Dec. 1
Joseph Nye, Understanding International Conflicts, pp. 3-28, 33-54.
112-116, 127-131 (available as library reserve or on Web-CT).

Dec. 6-13 Comparing 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis and the 2002-2003 Iraq War

Robert Kennedy, Thirteen Days, pp. 19-98.
Bob Woodward, Plan of Attack, pp. 24-295.

Articles assigned from newspapers, magazines, etc.

Take-Home Final Examination on Section V - - - Due During Final Exam Week

Some Useful Information:

The dates listed above show each time-period during which we shall be reading the material for that section. There is no need to do all of the reading for a section before the start of that time-period, but all of that reading should be finished before we go on to the next section. At the end of many of the classes, the most pertinent readings for the next class will be announced. To keep ourselves up to date on pertinent matters the class will also be assigned articles from newspapers, magazines, journals, etc., when they become available, and will be used for class discussions. Students will then be responsible for those articles on the next exam along with the other assigned readings.

The written work of the class will include three take-home tests. They should all be sent to the instructor via e-mail.

The "cut policy" here will be as follows. One or two missed classes will incur no questions or penalties, and will be regarded as your own private matter. But each subsequent absence will result in a grade deduction for the course. If you must miss a class for reasons such as illness, a family emergency, or a job interview, please let the instructor know, preferably in advance, and usually no objection will be raised.

If you find that you are going to be slightly late to a class, please come anyway. But people will want you to slip in unobtrusively.

All private business should be taken care of before or after class. When a class is in session, no one should leave the room for any reason except a genuine emergency.
For information on government department policies – please see the sheets to be distributed in class in future weeks..

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