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Thu April 2, 2015
  • Lecture: Realms of Earth and Sky

    7 p.m.
    Tang Museum

    Four centuries of South Asian art

    Realms of Earth and Sky, a Tang Teaching Museum exhibition of South Asian paintings from the 15th to the 19th century, will be the focus of tours, lectures, and even a workshop on miniature painting.

    From the opulence of the Mughal court to stories of gods in human form, from battle scenes to intimate depictions of courtly love, the 43 historic paintings in the show offer visitors a chance to explore important cultural narratives that remain central to many belief systems on the Indian subcontinent. Portraiture, religious and literary texts, ragamala paintings, and works from both Mughal and Rajput traditions are represented in meticulously rendered tableaux contained in the small scale of manuscript or album pages.

    Leading scholars of Rajput painting—Molly Aitken from the City College of New York and Dipti Khera from New York University—will lecture on pleasure in South Asian painting. The lecture is made possible by the Alfred Z. Solomon Residency Fund.

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    “Their small scale actually makes them very powerful,” says Tang curator Rachel Seligman ’91. “The size, the detail, and the luscious colors create great intensity,” she says. The Malloy Wing galleries have been painted and lit to offer a feeling of warmth and intimacy for exploring works that originally would have been held in one’s hands.

    Art history professor Saleema Waraich, a specialist in South Asia, notes that “South Asian artists were not interested, consciously, in realism as a pictorial mode of representation.” Also, because the works illuminate important texts—“religious manuscripts, literary ones, and there are even several paintings that come out of representation of musical modes”—they offer rich opportunities for interdisciplinary teaching and learning.

    Other related events:

    Artists’ Talk

    Artists Talha Rathore and Hiba Schahbaz will speak on the traditional techniques in Realms of Earth and Sky and how each has modernized and personalized them in her own practice. A specialist in miniature painting who studied at Pakistan’s National College of Arts, Rathore poetically describes dichotomies and anxieties in her work—for example, between the natural and the manmade, or between being an immigrant and feeling as if she belongs. Schahbaz, who also studied at Pakistan’s National College of Arts as well as Pratt Institute, investigates issues of self-identification: “By observing the symbolism and iconography of the cultures around me, I construct imagery that fuses the real with the imagined.” Thursday, April 16, 7:30 p.m., Tang Museum

    Workshop

    Artists Talha Rathore and Hiba Schahbaz will offer two miniature-painting workshops. Admission is free but space is limited and reservations are required: call 518-580-8080. Friday, April 17, noon–2 p.m. and 2:30–4:30 p.m., Tang Museum

  • Tour: Realms of Earth and Sky

    6 p.m.
    Tang Museum

    Four centuries of South Asian art

    Realms of Earth and Sky, a Tang Teaching Museum exhibition of South Asian paintings from the 15th to the 19th century, will be the focus of tours, lectures, and even a workshop on miniature painting.

    From the opulence of the Mughal court to stories of gods in human form, from battle scenes to intimate depictions of courtly love, the 43 historic paintings in the show offer visitors a chance to explore important cultural narratives that remain central to many belief systems on the Indian subcontinent. Portraiture, religious and literary texts, ragamala paintings, and works from both Mughal and Rajput traditions are represented in meticulously rendered tableaux contained in the small scale of manuscript or album pages.

    Gabriela Perez-Dietz ’15, an art history and anthropology double major, will lead a tour of the show with art-history faculty member Saleema Waraich. Perez-Dietz has been closely studying Realms of Earth and Sky for an independent study project.

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    “Their small scale actually makes them very powerful,” says Tang curator Rachel Seligman ’91. “The size, the detail, and the luscious colors create great intensity,” she says. The Malloy Wing galleries have been painted and lit to offer a feeling of warmth and intimacy for exploring works that originally would have been held in one’s hands.

    Art history professor Saleema Waraich, a specialist in South Asia, notes that “South Asian artists were not interested, consciously, in realism as a pictorial mode of representation.” Also, because the works illuminate important texts—“religious manuscripts, literary ones, and there are even several paintings that come out of representation of musical modes”—they offer rich opportunities for interdisciplinary teaching and learning.

    Other related events:

    Lecture

    Leading scholars of Rajput painting—Molly Aitken from the City College of New York and Dipti Khera from New York University—will lecture on pleasure in South Asian painting. The lecture is made possible by the Alfred Z. Solomon Residency Fund. Thursday, April 2, 7 p.m., Tang Museum

    Artists’ Talk

    Artists Talha Rathore and Hiba Schahbaz will speak on the traditional techniques in Realms of Earth and Sky and how each has modernized and personalized them in her own practice. A specialist in miniature painting who studied at Pakistan’s National College of Arts, Rathore poetically describes dichotomies and anxieties in her work—for example, between the natural and the manmade, or between being an immigrant and feeling as if she belongs. Schahbaz, who also studied at Pakistan’s National College of Arts as well as Pratt Institute, investigates issues of self-identification: “By observing the symbolism and iconography of the cultures around me, I construct imagery that fuses the real with the imagined.” Thursday, April 16, 7:30 p.m., Tang Museum

    Workshop

    Artists Talha Rathore and Hiba Schahbaz will offer two miniature-painting workshops. Admission is free but space is limited and reservations are required: call 518-580-8080. Friday, April 17, noon–2 p.m. and 2:30–4:30 p.m., Tang Museum

Thu April 9, 2015
  • Tribute to Artist Jeffrey Elgin

    4 p.m.
    Schick Art Gallery, Saisselin Art Building

    An accomplished artist who taught at Skidmore for 30 years until his retirement in 1998, Jeff Elgin was a beloved mentor, known for his rigorous work ethic, his calm and supportive manner, and his ability to fuel in his students a passion for drawing and painting.

    In a tribute to Elgin’s 50-year career as an artist, the Schick Art Gallery is presenting a solo exhibition of his paintings and drawings through April 26: Jeffrey Elgin: Thus Passed Some Days—Twenty Years upon an Overgrown Path. There will be a gallery talk with Elgin and art professor Paul Sattler, the Schick’s director, on Thursday, April 9.

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    Elgin has devoted his full energy to drawing and painting since his retirement; many works in the exhibition are new, and all were completed within the past 20 years. He says a frequent source of his inspiration is nature, which he calls the “touchstone for my imagination.” And Elgin still considers himself a student of painting and drawing. “To be a student is a privilege,” he says. “To be a student means remaining open, continually seeking, always questioning, embracing risk, and forever entering the unknown … In other words, your reach should exceed your grasp.”

    Gallery hours Mondays–Thursdays 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Fridays 10 a.m.–4 p.m., Saturdays–Sundays noon–4 p.m.

Thu April 16, 2015
  • Artists' Talk: Realms of Earth and Sky

    7:30 p.m.
    Tang Museum

    Four centuries of South Asian art

    Realms of Earth and Sky, a Tang Teaching Museum exhibition of South Asian paintings from the 15th to the 19th century, will be the focus of tours, lectures, and even a workshop on miniature painting.

    From the opulence of the Mughal court to stories of gods in human form, from battle scenes to intimate depictions of courtly love, the 43 historic paintings in the show offer visitors a chance to explore important cultural narratives that remain central to many belief systems on the Indian subcontinent. Portraiture, religious and literary texts, ragamala paintings, and works from both Mughal and Rajput traditions are represented in meticulously rendered tableaux contained in the small scale of manuscript or album pages.

    Artists Talha Rathore and Hiba Schahbaz will speak on the traditional techniques in Realms of Earth and Sky and how each has modernized and personalized them in her own practice. A specialist in miniature painting who studied at Pakistan’s National College of Arts, Rathore poetically describes dichotomies and anxieties in her work—for example, between the natural and the manmade, or between being an immigrant and feeling as if she belongs. Schahbaz, who also studied at Pakistan’s National College of Arts as well as Pratt Institute, investigates issues of self-identification: “By observing the symbolism and iconography of the cultures around me, I construct imagery that fuses the real with the imagined.”

    Read More

    “Their small scale actually makes them very powerful,” says Tang curator Rachel Seligman ’91. “The size, the detail, and the luscious colors create great intensity,” she says. The Malloy Wing galleries have been painted and lit to offer a feeling of warmth and intimacy for exploring works that originally would have been held in one’s hands.

    Art history professor Saleema Waraich, a specialist in South Asia, notes that “South Asian artists were not interested, consciously, in realism as a pictorial mode of representation.” Also, because the works illuminate important texts—“religious manuscripts, literary ones, and there are even several paintings that come out of representation of musical modes”—they offer rich opportunities for interdisciplinary teaching and learning.

    Other related events:

    Workshop

    Artists Talha Rathore and Hiba Schahbaz will offer two miniature-painting workshops. Admission is free but space is limited and reservations are required: call 518-580-8080. Friday, April 17, noon–2 p.m. and 2:30–4:30 p.m., Tang Museum

Fri April 17, 2015
  • Miniature-Painting Workshop: Realms of Earth and Sky

    noon–2 p.m. and 2:30–4:30 p.m.
    Tang Museum

    Four centuries of South Asian art

    Realms of Earth and Sky, a Tang Teaching Museum exhibition of South Asian paintings from the 15th to the 19th century, will be the focus of tours, lectures, and even a workshop on miniature painting.

    From the opulence of the Mughal court to stories of gods in human form, from battle scenes to intimate depictions of courtly love, the 43 historic paintings in the show offer visitors a chance to explore important cultural narratives that remain central to many belief systems on the Indian subcontinent. Portraiture, religious and literary texts, ragamala paintings, and works from both Mughal and Rajput traditions are represented in meticulously rendered tableaux contained in the small scale of manuscript or album pages.

    Artists Talha Rathore and Hiba Schahbaz will offer two miniature-painting workshops. Admission is free but space is limited and reservations are required: call 518-580-8080.

    Read More

    “Their small scale actually makes them very powerful,” says Tang curator Rachel Seligman ’91. “The size, the detail, and the luscious colors create great intensity,” she says. The Malloy Wing galleries have been painted and lit to offer a feeling of warmth and intimacy for exploring works that originally would have been held in one’s hands.

    Art history professor Saleema Waraich, a specialist in South Asia, notes that “South Asian artists were not interested, consciously, in realism as a pictorial mode of representation.” Also, because the works illuminate important texts—“religious manuscripts, literary ones, and there are even several paintings that come out of representation of musical modes”—they offer rich opportunities for interdisciplinary teaching and learning.

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