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Sun April 6, 2014
  • Senior Recital: David Slitzky, Andrew Koehler, and William Sacks, Jazz

    8 p.m.
    Helen Filene Ladd Concert Hall, Arthur Zankel Music Center

Mon April 7, 2014
  • Rami Zurayk: "Implications of the ‘Arab Spring’"

    6:30 p.m.
    Davis Auditorium, Palamountain Hall

    Agronomist, scholar, and activist Rami Zurayk will speak about the Mideast and North African uprisings and revolutions that began in spring 2010. He will discuss declining Arab agricultural sector, the problem of food insecurity, and the plight of the Arab small farmer, with a particular focus on Palestine. Cosponsored by the Government and International Affairs Departments.

Tue April 8, 2014
  • Brainard Carey: The Art World Demystified

    6 p.m.
    Filene Recital Hall

    The author of Making It in the Art World: New Approaches to Galleries, Shows, and Raising Money, Brainard Carey urges artists to bypass the traditional gallery system for less conventional methods of getting their art to market. In this talk sponsored by the Arts Administration Program, Carey will describe the burgeoning DIY movement among artists. He’ll ask, “What if you could create a way of working with money that was as creative as making art?” He’ll then examine some of the creative ways that artists have sold their work and managed their careers on their on terms.

  • Public Health: Start Here!

    7 to 9 p.m.
    Tang Museum

    Celebrate National Public Health Week by stopping at the Tang for interactive games, free food, and information about public health. Tables will be sponsored by Peer Health Educators, the Center for Sex and Gender Relations, and other groups.

Wed April 9, 2014
  • Arun Chaudhary: "Behind-the-Camera at the White House"

    7 p.m.
    Gannett Auditorium, Palamountain Hall

    Arun Chaudhary was the first official White House videographer, a position created for him at the beginning of the Obama administration. Chaudhary travelled extensively with the president, capturing public events and behind-the-scenes moments and producing presidential tapings for the Internet and television. Introducing Chaudhary will be history professor Tillman Nechtman, chair of the working group that is developing Skidmore’s Documentary Studies Collaborative. Chaudhary's talk is sponsored by the Student Speakers Bureau.

Thu April 10, 2014
  • Ann Rosalind Jones: "Terrifying Strangers: The New World ‘Other’ in Renaissance Costume Books"

    5:30 p.m.
    Davis Auditorium, Palamountain Hall

    The Dunn Professor of Comparative Literature at Smith College, Ann Rosalind Jones reads clothes “as a material language.” In Renaissance Clothing and the Materials of Memory, she examinesd portraits, spinning, embroidery, armor, and literary texts to “analyze the links between what people in early modern Europe wore and who they believed they were.” In this lecture sponsored by the Art History Department, she’ll discuss her current study of the Renaissance-era French and Italian illustrated costume books, drawing on anthropology and material culture to explore European imagery of New World peoples.

  • Mainstage Production: If All the Sky Were Paper

    8 p.m.
    Janet Kinghorn Bernhard Theater

    “The world’s greatest undiscovered literature.”

    That’s how author Andrew Carroll describes letters written during wartime by American soldiers, sailors, and airmen, and their loved ones. Over the last 15 years, he has collected more than 90,000 of such letters from every war in which Americans have fought. A distillation of this material provides the essential script for If All the Sky Were Paper, the mainstage production to be presented by the Theater Department in April.

    Directed by Lary Opitz, professor and chair of theater, the play is based on War Letters and Behind the Lines, the two best-selling books Carroll produced from the “Legacy Project,” which encourages Americans to honor those who have served or are currently serving the nation by preserving their letters and e-mails home.

    Opitz said he selected the play for its timeliness and the “opportunity to remind students and those who see the play that thousands of our fellow Americans are actively engaged in a war in Afghanistan.”

    “The play is not political in any way,” he continued. “It honors all of those who have fought for their country and continue to fight today. It reminds us of the impact of war.”

    Opitz discovered the play when it came to Albany last year as part of a 50-state Legacy Project tour and he joined the production as one of five actors.

    For the Skidmore show, Opitz has adapted the play for 11 actors and dramatized the narration for more action. The students will take on the roles of the military men and women and their loved ones at home, acting out the full spectrum of emotions and experiences contained in the letters.

    There will be seven performances: Thursday, April 10, Friday, April 11, and Saturday, April 12, 8 p.m.; Sunday, April 13, 2 p.m.; Thursday, April 17 and Friday, April 19, 8 p.m.; and Saturday, April 20, 2 p.m., Janet Kinghorn Bernard Theater. Tickets are $12 for general admission and $8 for students and seniors.

  • Megan McArdle: "The Up Side of Down"

    8 p.m.
    Gannett Auditorium, Palamountain Hall

    A Washington-based journalist who writes about economics, business, and public policy, Megan McArdle is the author of The Up Side of Down. Drawing on interviews, academic research, and her own experience with catastrophic life events, she’ll discuss why failure is an inevitable- and beneficial - part of life, and how to make failure a learning experience instead of a catastrophe. (Carr Distinguished Interdisciplinary Lecture)

  • Senior Independent Study in Dance: Michael Rivera ’14

    8 p.m.
    Payne Presentation Room, Tang Museum

    A study created by Michael Rivera ’14 in collaboration with John Schneider ’14, this performance will explore space, familiarity, and the recognition of that space using movement and film. Additional performances 4/12 at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m.

  • Senior Recital: Mavis MacNeil, Composition

    8 p.m.
    Helen Filene Ladd Concert Hall, Arthur Zankel Music Center

Fri April 11, 2014
  • Drums and Gongs: Taiko and Gamelan Class Recital

    4 p.m.
    Helen Filene Ladd Concert Hall, Arthur Zankel Music Center

    Coached by Lei Ouyang Bryant and Elizabeth Macy.

  • Kenneth A. Freirich Business Plan Competition: Final Presentations

    2 p.m.
    Payne Presentation Room, Tang Museum

    Six student-lead businesses—some startups, some existing—will complete in the final round of the Kenneth A. Frierich Business Plan Competition on Friday at the Tang Museum. The student entrepreneurs will vie for a first prize of $20,000 and a second and third prizes of $10,000 and $5,000. They are:

    Ezra Levy '15 and Monica Jewell '15. They've launched a Web-based enterprise, Open Campus, that matches college students with businesses offering real-world freelance work requiring the skills that the students showcase in portfolios on the site.

    Walter Barber '14, Ian Van Nest '14, and Andrew Zimmermann '14. As Leaf Pile Media, they created an "original fictional universe" that they aim to turn into a profitable board game, graphic novel, and app, eventually expanding into online games and animation.

    Stella Langat '16. She is registering Dubble Dee's LLC in Kenya as what she describes as the nation's first undergarment production company dedicated to making reasonably priced intimate apparel for the modern African woman.

    Adam Beek '15. Lunching Munchi Heaving Agri, he aims to develop an organic farming enterprise in Jamaica to grow celery, lettuce, and other products with the goal of making an impact on his local community.

    Alexander Nassief '16 and Zach Rohde '14. Taking second place in last year's Frierich Competition, they continue to grow Rum Dog Inc., developing a luxury rum brand based in Dominica and a patent-pending, proprietary aging method in which barrels of rum are submerged in the Caribbean Sea.

    Seth Berger '14.Taking third place in last year's Frierich Competition, he continues to develop East Coast Lacrosse, a maker of lacrosse apparel that last year generated sales of more than $73,000.

    "Each year, the quality of the plans and the presentations just keeps improving," says Ken Frierich '90, founder of the contest. He started his own publishing business as a student and is now president of Health Monitor Network. "It's deeply rewarding to see so many students following their passions and developing these businesses with such talent and creativity. I continue to get inspired by them," he adds. As he did last year, Freirich contributed $20,000 toward the first prize. Other alumni contributed prize money as well.

  • Mainstage Production: If All the Sky Were Paper

    8 p.m.
    Janet Kinghorn Bernhard Theater

    "The world’s greatest undiscovered literature." That’s how author Andrew Carroll describes letters written during wartime by Americans in combat and their loved ones at home. Over the last 15 years, Carroll collected more than 90,000 letters from every war in which Americans have fought. They provide the essential script for If All the Sky Were Paper, the spring mainstage production presented by the Theater Department.

    Directed by Lary Opitz, professor of theater, the play is based on War Letters and Behind the Lines, the two best-selling books Carroll produced from the Legacy Project, which encourages Americans to honor military service members by preserving their letters and e-mails home. Opitz says he selected the play for its timeliness and the "opportunity to remind students and those who see the play that thousands of our fellow Americans are actively engaged in a war in Afghanistan." But he continues, "The play is not political in any way. It honors all of those who have fought for their country and continue to fight today. It reminds us of the impact of war.”

    Opitz first discovered the play when it came to Albany last year as part of a 50-state Legacy Project tour and he joined the production as one of five actors. For Skidmore, he adapted it for 11 actors and dramatized the narration for more action. Students play the roles of military men and women and their families and friends, acting out the full spectrum of emotions and experiences in the letters.

    There will be seven performances: Thursday, April 10, Friday, April 11, and Saturday, April 12, 8 p.m.; Sunday, April 13, 2 p.m.; Thursday, April 17 and Friday, April 19, 8 p.m.; and Saturday, April 20, 2 p.m. Tickets are $12 for general admission and $8 for students and seniors.

Sat April 12, 2014
  • Mainstage Production: If All the Sky Were Paper

    2 p.m.
    Janet Kinghorn Bernhard Theater

    "The world’s greatest undiscovered literature." That’s how author Andrew Carroll describes letters written during wartime by Americans in combat and their loved ones at home. Over the last 15 years, Carroll collected more than 90,000 letters from every war in which Americans have fought. They provide the essential script for If All the Sky Were Paper, the spring mainstage production presented by the Theater Department.

    Directed by Lary Opitz, professor of theater, the play is based on War Letters and Behind the Lines, the two best-selling books Carroll produced from the Legacy Project, which encourages Americans to honor military service members by preserving their letters and e-mails home. Opitz says he selected the play for its timeliness and the "opportunity to remind students and those who see the play that thousands of our fellow Americans are actively engaged in a war in Afghanistan." But he continues, "The play is not political in any way. It honors all of those who have fought for their country and continue to fight today. It reminds us of the impact of war.”

    Opitz first discovered the play when it came to Albany last year as part of a 50-state Legacy Project tour and he joined the production as one of five actors. For Skidmore, he adapted it for 11 actors and dramatized the narration for more action. Students play the roles of military men and women and their families and friends, acting out the full spectrum of emotions and experiences in the letters.

    There will be seven performances: Thursday, April 10, Friday, April 11, and Saturday, April 12, 8 p.m.; Sunday, April 13, 2 p.m.; Thursday, April 17 and Friday, April 19, 8 p.m.; and Saturday, April 20, 2 p.m. Tickets are $12 for general admission and $8 for students and seniors.

  • Senior Independent Study in Dance: Michael Rivera ’14

    2 and 8 p.m.
    Payne Room, Tang Museum

    A study created by Michael Rivera ’14 in collaboration with John Schneider ’14, this performance will explore space, familiarity, and the recognition of that space using movement and film.

  • Shared Senior Recital: Cindy Lan, Viola and Elizabeth Estey, French Horn

    8 p.m.
    Helen Filene Ladd Concert Hall, Arthur Zankel Music Center

  • Skidmore Community Chorus with Vocal Chamber Ensemble

    3 p.m.
    Arthur Zankel Music Center, Helen Filene Ladd Concert Hall

    Directed by Katie Gardiner. The performance will feature Duruflé’s Requiem with special guest Edwin Lawrence from Williams College on organ. The Vocal Chamber Ensemble will perform a selection of sacred pieces by Verdi, Josquin, and Palestrina. Tickets: $8 adults, $5 seniors/Skidmore community, free for students and children.

  • Ujima Step Show

    7 p.m.
    Filene Recital Hall

    Step-dancing performance by Ujima, Skidmore’s African, African-American, and Caribbean-American cultural awareness club.

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