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Summer Pre-College
 

Pre-College Courses

Program Dates: June 30 – August 4, 2018

Course # • Course Title • Credits • Instructor • Lab Fee (if any)
Course Days (R designates Thursday) • Class Time 

*All course placements are subject to approval by the Pre-College Director

 

Morning Courses

AN-101 • Intro to Cultural Anthropology • 3 • Christine Vassallo-Oby
T/W/F • 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM
An overview of concepts, theories, and methods of cultural anthropology. Students learn about central anthropological topics, such as kinship, gender, class, race, environment, ritual and religion, ethnicity, economy, and politics, and gain understanding and appreciation for cultural differences.
 
AR-101 • Intro to Painting • 3 • Hannah Morris • Lab Fee: $60
AR-101Z • Intro to Painting Workshop • 0 • Lab Fee: $60
M/T/W/R/F • 9:30 AM – 12:30 PM
An introduction to painting as a medium of visual expression. Emphasis is placed upon exploration of formal and technical concerns. Basic studies include drawing and will explore a variety of subject matter and media directed toward the organization of the two-dimensional plane.
 
AR-264H • Paper Print Press • 4 • Patrick Casey • Lab Fee: $100
AR-264Z • Paper Print Press Workshop • 0 • Lab Fee: $100
M/T/W/R/F • 8:45 AM – 12:30 PM
Starting with the creation of their printing papers students will explore different traditional paper making and printmaking techniques. Both Nepalese style and Western style, paper-making will be taught along with relief, chine colle, and letterpress printing techniques. This course will have the student consider the image they make, as well as the surface it sits on, the paper. While the skills are traditional, the ideas explored for the projects completed in class will be contemporary. 
 
CH-115 ● Fundamentals of Chemistry (w/Lab) ● 4 ● Beatrice Kendall
M/T/W/R/F • 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM
An Introductory course for students with little to no background in chemistry. Fundamental chemical concepts such as atomic structure, bonding, chemical reactions, and the properties of solids, liquids, and gases are presented.  Emphasis is placed on learning the “language of chemistry,” achieving the ability to visualize and understand process on an atomic and molecular level, and developing problem solving skills. Laboratory exercises and experiments serve to illustrate concepts presented in the lecture. This course is appropriate for students preparing to take Chemistry 125-Principles of Chemistry and for students who seek a one-semester survey of the subject.
 
EX-111 ● Introduction to Exercise Science ● 4 ● Justin Faller
M/T/W/R/F • 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM
An introduction to the scientific basis of physical activity. Emphasis is placed upon the study of the physiological change and adaptions that occur as a result of the stress of exercise.  Students will be active participants in laboratory experiments that examine the body’s response to exercise. 
 
GE-101 001 • Earth Systems Science • 4 • Kyle Nichols • Lab Fee: $50
M/T/W/R/F • 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM
An introduction to Earth’s dynamic systems and geologic processes. The planet is studied from its deep interior to its oceanic, surficial, and atmospheric components to develop a scientific understanding of Earth as a holistic environmental system, of which the biosphere, including humanity, is one component. Within this context, course topics such as rocks and minerals, mountain building, earthquakes, volcanoes, glaciers, surface and groundwater, and resources are examined from the perspective of the interactions between geologic processes and humans.
 
MF-101 • Introduction to Media and Film Studies • 4 • Aaron Pedinotti
M/T/W/R9:00 AM – 11:55 AM
An interdisciplinary introduction to the questions re: Human dilemmas in the context of an increasingly technology and media saturated culture. The course begins with close consideration of the nature and structure of human communication and an historical overview of communications and media. Students will study media from both psychological and societal perspectives and will consider the impact of media on politics, government, community, and consumer behavior. Special attention will be paid throughout the course to the personal and social impact of current and emerging forms of communication and media.
 
RE-103 • Religion and Culture • 4 • Thomas Davis
M/T/W/R/F • 9:30 AM – 11:55 AM               
An introductory study of the nature of religion, the interaction of religion and culture, and the function of religious belief in the life of the individual. Consideration will be given to such phenomena as myth and ritual, sacred time and space, mysticism, evil, conversion, and salvation. Readings will be drawn from classical and modern sources.
 
WLI-101 • Elementary Italian • 4 • Barbara Garbin
M/T/W/R • 9:00 AM – 11:55 AM
An introduction to spoken and written Italian emphasizing cultural perspectives. Linguistic emphasis is on basic grammar, vocabulary, and the development of reading, conversation, and writing skills while learning about the culture of Italy.
Note(s): Four hours of class, one hour of drill or tutorial.
 

Afternoon Courses

AR-133 • Drawing I • 4Kathy Hemingway-Jones • Lab Fee: $50
AR-133Z • Drawing I Workshop • 0 • Lab Fee: $50
M/T/W/R/F • 1:30 PM – 5:15 PM
This course builds on basic drawing experiences, refining skills in observation, organization, interpretation, and critical analysis. Studio work introduces a range of traditional drawing tools and materials while exploring a variety of approaches to image making and visual expression.
 
AR-264J • Special Topic: Research to Artwork • 4 • Sophie Isaak, Katie DeGroot • Lab Fee: $100 
AR-264Z • Special Topic: Research to Artwork Workshop • 0 • Lab Fee: $100
M/T/W/R/F • 1:30 PM – 5:15 PM
This course will ask students to work from both assigned and self-determined subject matter to research, and to collect, material for creating artwork. Drawing, collage, printmaking, photography, and bookmaking techniques will be used to respond to the information gathered. Discussion and presentation of various artists’ work, along with readings and critiques, will support the studio explorations.
 
BI-170 • Human Genetics • 4 • Bernard Possidente • Lab fee: $80
M/T/W/R/F • 1:30 PM – 4:30 PM
An introduction to the principles of genetics and their application to human biology. Topics include the history of genetics; the structure, function, and inheritance of genes; medical genetics; and genetic engineering.
 
GE-101 002 • Earth Systems Science • 4 • Kyle Nichols • Lab Fee: $50
M/T/W/R/F • 1:30 PM – 4:30 PM
An introduction to Earth’s dynamic systems and geologic processes. The planet is studied from its deep interior to its oceanic, surficial, and atmospheric components to develop a scientific understanding of Earth as a holistic environmental system, of which the biosphere, including humanity, is one component. Within this context, course topics such as rocks and minerals, mountain building, earthquakes, volcanoes, glaciers, surface and groundwater, and resources are examined from the perspective of the interactions between geologic processes and humans.
 
HI-111 • Intro to Latin American History • 3 • Kate Paarlberg-Kvam
M/T/W/R • 1:15 PM – 3:30 PM
An introduction to the economic, political, social, and intellectual history of Latin America. Organized thematically and chronologically, topics emphasize understanding the emergence of the colonies of Spain, Portugal, France, and England into a group of distinct nation-states. Students will explore Latin American society from initial encounters among Europeans, Africans, and Native Americans. We then study independence: political, economic, and social challenges of early nation-state formation in a multicultural context. We conclude with the twentieth century, addressing topics such as industrialization, revolution, U.S.-Latin American relations, and selected intellectual trends.
 
MA-108 • Calculus with Algebra • 3 • Emelie Kenney
M/T/W/R • 1:15 PM – 3:30 PM
An introduction to derivatives, integrals, and their applications. Primarily for students who are not adequately prepared for MA 111, this course (together with MA 109) covers the same material as MA 111 but integrates the material requisite to calculus with the calculus itself. Note that MA 108 alone cannot be used as a substitute for MA 111. Successful completion of MA 108 and MA 109 is equivalent to completion of MA 111. Prerequisite: math placement exam.
 
PY-109 • Physics: Sound and Music • 4 • Jill Linz
M/T/W/R/F • 1:30 PM – 4:30 PM
The physical principles of sound—how it is produced, propagated, and perceived. Illumination of principles will emphasize examples from music. Mechanisms used to produce different types of musical sounds will be discussed as well as the physical principles behind the reproduction of music in its many forms such as radio, tape recorders, and CD players. The laboratory component will include measurement of the speed of sound, frequency analysis of musical instruments, and sound recording.
 
SO-101 • Sociological Perspectives • 3 • Phil Lewis
M/T/W/R • 1:15 PM – 3:30 PM
The basic concepts and principles of major sociological perspectives. Attention is given to how these perspectives have been developed and used by social scientists to explain social phenomena. Recommended as an introduction to the discipline.
 

 Late Afternoon Courses

EN-103 • Writing Seminar I • 4 • Andy Fogle
M/T/W/R • 3:45 PM – 6:10 PM
Introduction to expository writing with weekly writing assignments emphasizing skills in developing ideas, organizing material, and creating thesis statements. Assignments provide practice in description, definition, comparison and contrast, and argumentation. Additional focus on grammar, syntax, and usage. Prerequisite: writing placement exam. 
 
EN-105 • Writing Seminar II • 4 • François Bonneville, Thaddeus Niles
M/T/W/R • 3:45 PM – 6:10 PM
This seminar immerses students in the process of producing finished analytical essays informed by critical reading and careful reasoning. Special attention is given to developing ideas, writing from sources, organizing material, and revising drafts. Additional emphasis is on grammar, style, and formal conventions of writing. Students respond to one another’s work in workshops or peer critique sessions. Prerequisite:Prerequisite: writing placement exam.

 

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