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Ad Lib
Doing "justice"...
When David met Ronald by Prof. Giuseppe Faustini

 

Ad Lib

Doing "justice"...

For me, criminal justice is primarily a moral response that articulates why the offending behavior was wrong and details the harm caused to victims and the wider community. Restorative justice, which requires that offenders take steps to repair the harm, is quite a contrast to traditional punitive measures. Both approaches are concerned with balancing the scales of justice, but the restorative approach is more uplifting.
DAVID KARP, associate professor of sociology

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The US Anti-Doping Agency isn’t particularly forthcoming about what supplements and herbs athletes can or can’t use. Justice would be served if athletes could first try different supplements, with the stipulation that testing would not be official. If a test came back positive, they could stop using the supplement. Instead, athletes live in fear of being banned from their sport and marred by the media. Every time I pee in that cup, I get nervous that my reputation will be ruined.
JOY FAHRENKROG ’02, world-class competitive archer

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A prosecutor’s primary duty is to see that justice is done. But exemptions are routinely given to a large cross-section of the public summoned for jury duty—often those whose income would suffer from missed work—and a jury without them is not well rounded. Defense attorneys often submit a lengthy witness list and overestimate the length of a trial, knowing that such potential jurors will ask for and receive an exemption. The constitutional guarantee of a fair trial is meant to apply to both sides in our judicial system.
MARY AVERY GESSNER ’58,
retired prosecutor

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The mantra I always use in campus judicial cases is “Reasonable people respond reasonably.” We have a conversation among the complainant, the respondent, and the judicial board to identify what harm was done, determine why it happened and how to prevent its recurrence, and find ways to fix or ease the harm. So campus justice is an opportunity—a chance for the person who caused a hurt or a loss to make it whole again.
DON HASTINGS,
director of residential life