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Ad Lib
A sense of 'style'
Periscope Competitive hedge
Race, class, and belonging Skidmore College saved my life
Presidential perspective Athletes turn crisis into creativity
A Skidmore stone at Babi Yar Sharing the spirit of Skidmore

 

Ad Lib

A sense of 'style'...

My former drawing professor, whose critiques of student works was often met with “But that’s just my style of drawing,” used to say that style is like the hour hand of a clock, and work is the minute hand. That is, style is something you arrive at after many works, not something you set as a standard and work from.
PATRICK O'ROURKE, designer and media specialist,
Tang Museum


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“You can’t dress it, you gotta be it. Original Manifestation!” I use this frequently to describe style.
GARLAND NELSON’96, musician

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Style is “a moveable feast!” Clothing first comes to mind, but since I am an artist I also think of style as it occurs in the visual arts, music, dance, literature—and also in politics. Fashions in the arts, just as in clothing, come and go, repeat themselves, change, affect the marketplace. What influences style, and who is the arbiter? There are lots of questions and very few answers!
JANE ZIRINSKY HASKELL ’44, artist

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Modern artists, like Monet and Van Gogh, tended to develop a singular, recognizable “style,” in part because it was easier to market. But after about 1950 that changed. With contemporary artists you’re more apt to see a conceptual rather than visual style—Jeff Koons, for instance, consistently works with issues of mass culture and reproducibility, but his works often don’t look the same. And other artists deliberately use a mish-mash of styles, which can come to be seen as their “style.”
KATIE HAUSER, associate professor of art history

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A sage might explain/ Life and death are the same/ Which style, like all vanities, denies./ For the rest of us mortals/ Our style would thus signal/ We’ve no interest in untimely demise.
FRANÇOIS BONNEVILLE, visiting assistant professor
of English


PICK YOUR OWN. What concept would you like to ad lib about? If there’s a topic you’d like to see addressed in this column, send an e-mail to srosenbe@skidmore.edu or call 518-580-5747.