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Summer 2002

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Global complications

     As if cross-border pollution, and world trade, and foreign relations weren’t knotty and compelling enough, the September 11 attacks and their aftermath added a new, life-or-death urgency to many difficult global issues. And Skidmore’s guest lectures in international affairs and environmental studies—many of them funded by a three-year federal grant—responded accordingly. The spring semester included:

  • “A Critique of Neoliberal Environmental and World Trade Policies,” by John Gowdy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

  • “At Home Abroad: Identity and Power in American Foreign Policy—Can the U.S. Win the War on Terrorism?” by Henry R. Nau, George Washington University

  • “The State of the European Union: Perspectives from Brussels and New York,” by Ambassador John Richardson

  • “From Los Angeles to Kyoto: The Evolution of Emission Trading,” by Tom Tietenberg, Colby College

  • “German and EU Perspectives on the Environment, Terrorism, and Other Global Issues Since September 11,” by Sascha Mueller-Kraenner, Heinrich Böll Foundation, Germany
 


© 2002 Skidmore College