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Ad Lib
The meaning of "escape"
Honorable oratory

 

Ad Lib

The meaning of "escape"...

When I deal with escapes, here’s an idea of what the experience is like: “Grab the dart gun and meet me in the truck! Get everyone inside and close off all containment areas! Attention, all zoo radios, we have a Code One gorilla; repeat, Code One gorilla.” You make sure you turn on the electric fence in the lion exhibit, and always triple-check your locks.
JONATHAN GILMOUR ’00, zookeeper

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Escape, to me, has positive connotations of moving toward rather than fleeing from. Many of the moments that come to mind combine physical exertion with a breakthrough in my level of skill…mountain biking, riding dressage. But escape comes too from good, deep thinking, when you vanish into the problem at hand.
WENDY ANTHONY, archivist,
Scribner Library

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I don’t much trust the concept of escaping (once, in college, my housing had fire escapes made of wood). As
a hunter, I see “the one that gets away” less as an escapee than as a partner in the dance of life and death. And I don’t care for the escapism of our society, where reality is ever more scripted, while we live at an increasing remove from the natural world.
MARY STANGE, associate professor of women’s studies and religion

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For me, inner modes of escape are the result of immersion in art—a line from a Howard Nemerov poem, the genomic tangles of a Matthew Ritchie painting, the edge of a stage where Guided By Voices is pumping out a song with loud and messy glee. Of the external escapes, I like being in a car, and moving toward…somewhere else; destination is immaterial.
MARC WOODWORTH ’84, associate editor of Salmagundi

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When you’re a graduating senior, escape means being set free from papers and exams but also being shaken from Skidmore’s warm, familiar, motherly skirts. I view my escape from Skidmore as a lifelong ambassadorship; my experiences elsewhere will be manifestations of how I’ve learned and grown here.
CATHERINE ROGERS ’05,
English major