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Winte 2002

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Contents

Features

Observations

Letters

On campus

The faculty

Sports

Books

Arts on view

Alumni affairs
and development

Class notes

 

 
 

Books

European Union in International Politics: Baptism by Fire
Rimbaud et l’Algérie
Stravinsky Inside Out
The Careers of British Musicians, 1750–1850: A Profession of Artisans
Jazz in Short Measures: Jazz History in 10 “Lectures” with Selected CD Recommendations
Foci: Interviews with 10 International Curators
Journey to Nowhere
Frozen Summer
The Road to Home


European Union in International Politics: Baptism by Fire

by Roy H. Ginsberg, Professor of Government; foreword by Ambassador Stuart E. Eizenstat
Rowman and Littlefield, 2001

     This pathbreaking book provides a systematic evaluation of the political impact of the European Union (EU) on a global scale. Roy Ginsberg links the context and sources of EU foreign policy actions with the processes and outputs of decision-making and then examines how outsiders view the EU. Combining a synthesis of the literature with primary interviews and case studies that document the reach and limits of the EU’s international political influence, the author’s analysis takes the study of EU foreign policy to a new level of understanding. By defining, describing, and explaining the different levels and degrees of external political impact, the book serves as a model for the advancement of conceptual knowledge, political science research, and survey techniques and methodology. Scholars, students, and policymakers alike will find this work valuable for understanding EU involvement in international politics seen from the perspective of non-EU players.

Rimbaud et l’Algérie

by Hédi Abdel-Jaouad, Associate Professor of French
Editions Les Mains Secrètes Tunis-New York, 2002

     The enduring if not mythic reputation of French Symbolist poet Arthur Rimbaud (1854–1891) rests paradoxically on a flashy but slim oeuvre and an equally eventful but brief life. His meteoric work and life remain a current subject of passionate debates and controversies. Hédi Jaouad’s book tackles a topic that has not yet received critical attention: the place of Algeria in Rimbaud’s poetic vision. At the center of Rimbaud’s Algerian vision is a poem in Latin, Jugurtha, for which he won—at the age of fourteen—the Latin Poetry Prize at the Concours Académique. In it, Rimbaud subverts Sallust’s classic Bellum Jugurthinum (Jugurtha Wars) in order to disparage the French invasion and occupation of Algeria. For many French-speaking Algerians today, Rimbaud stands not only as the poet-visionary—the seer whose beguiling language and violent imaginary is emulated and imitated by many—but also as an early advocate for an independent Algeria.

Stravinsky Inside Out

by Charles M. Joseph, Professor of Music
Yale University Press, 2001

     In this, his second book on the great twentieth-century composer Igor Stravinsky, Chuck Joseph examines both the public persona and the private man, revealing “a far more flawed and fragile human being” than previously understood, according to the New Yorker. The result, says the publisher, is “a richer and more human portrait of Stravinsky than anyone has done before.” Joseph, who has studied Stravinsky for thirty years, gained access to a huge archive of unpublished materials at the Paul Sacher Institute in Switzerland, which helped him present a sometimes controversial view beyond the heretofore filtered image carefully nurtured by Stravinsky’s collaborator Robert Craft. Also indebted to his Skidmore course “Stravinsky and Balanchine: A Union of Minds,” which he team-teaches with dance professor Isabel Brown, Joseph acknowledges that his book is “based on what I learned teaching the course.”

The Careers of British Musicians, 1750–1850: A Profession of Artisans

by Deborah Rohr, Associate Professor of Music
Cambridge University Press, 2001

     The study of the social context of music must consider the day-to-day experiences of its practitioners; their economic, social, professional, and artistic goals; and the material and cultural conditions under which these goals were pursued. Deborah Rohr’s book traces the daily working life and aspirations of British musicians during the sweeping social and economic transformation of Britain from 1750 to1850. It features working musicians of all types and at all levels—organists, singers, instrumentalists, teachers, composers, and entrepreneurs—and explores their educational backgrounds, conditions of employment, and wages; the systems of patronage that supported them; and their individual perceptions. Rohr focuses not only on social and economic pressures but also on a range of negative cultural beliefs faced by the musicians. Also considered are the implications of such conditions for their social and professional status, and for their musical aspirations.

Jazz in Short Measures: Jazz History in 10 “Lectures” with Selected CD Recommendations

by Lewis Rosengarten, Lecturer in Liberal Studies
Universe Incorporated, 2001

     For those who have witnessed Lewis Rosengarten’s love of teaching, it comes as no surprise that his new book on jazz is structured as a series of ten lectures, along with recommendations for videos, readings, Web sites, and CDs (“One can use this book to build a CD collection,” says an online reviewer). Rosengarten takes a multidimensional perspective that looks at the musical lives, struggles, and achievements of jazz musicians across a century of evolving styles and idioms. Lecture 3, for instance, covers “The Pioneers of Swing; Mainstream Com-mercialism; New York; Diverse Cultur-al Acceptance; Europe”; Lecture 5: “What is Bebop? How is it Different from Swing?” and Lecture 9: “Mingus, Coltrane, 2 Unique, Eclectic Giants, Free Beginnings.” An appreciation of the personal lives and hardships of the musicians informs the understanding of the styles and periods.

Foci: Interviews with 10 International Curators

Interviews and introduction by Carolee Brecher Thea ’59; foreword by Barry Schwabsky
Apex Art Books, 2001

     Foci gathers interviews with ten of the most renowned curators working internationally in the field of contemporary art. Rich with wide-ranging dialogue, the interviews cover issues including the relationship between the exhibit and its location; art as the barometer for the age; the role of architecture, fashion, and design in shaping art; the notions of national and gender identity in art; as well as more specific issues concerning personal curatorial styles. The reader gains insight into the work and thought processes of some of the most creative individuals in today’s art world, including Kasper Koenig, Rosa Martinez, Hou Hanru, Harald Szee-mann, Vasif Kortun, Maria Hlavajova, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Dan Cameron, Yuko Hasegawa, and Barbara London.

Journey to Nowhere
Frozen Summer
The Road to Home

by Mary Jane Springer Auch ’60
Henry Holt & Co., 1997, 1998, 2000

     In the first book of this trilogy, the reader meets eleven-year-old Remembrance, her parents, and her younger brother, who travel by covered wagon from Connecticut to western New York in 1815. Their journey proves hazardous and not without tension, as Papa exerts unreasonable pressures on the family. Writes one reviewer, “Mem is spunky and believable, and her family [is]…real: layered, complex, and likable. [The book] gives a definite feel for pioneer life… without the feel of a history lesson.” In Frozen Summer the hardships and adventure continue when severe frosts wipe out Papa’s crops and Mem is called upon to care for her baby sister, her brother, and her ailing mother. Eventually, Papa agrees to move the family back East. By the third novel, The Road to Home, Mama is dead and the family is heading back to Connecticut to join their relatives. But when they reach Rome, N.Y., Papa joins a crew digging the Erie Canal, and it becomes clear to Mem that she herself will be the one to bring her siblings to a better home.—MTS

Alumni authors are urged to send copies of their books, publisher’s notes, or reviews, so that Scope can make note of their work in the “Books” column.

 


© 2001 Skidmore College