CLASSICS 202:  INTERMEDIATE LATIN II
Vergil's Aeneid
 MWF 10:10 - 11:05 a.m.   •   201 Palamountain Hall 
Instructor
Overview
Objectives
Texts
Requirements
Timetable
 
Instructor:  Professor Dan Curley
    Office:  Harder Hall 208b
    Hours:  MWF 11:10 a.m. - 12:05 p.m., and by appointment
    Phone:  (580-)5463
    Email:  dcurley@scott.skidmore.edu

Overview.  The Aeneid, the story of the flight of the hero Aeneas from Troy to Italy, is considered Vergil’s masterpiece, perhaps even the greatest poem ever written in Latin.  In this course you will read all of Aeneid book 1 in Latin, and parts of other books as well, in order to maintain and strengthen your foundation in the language.  Furthermore, book 1 will serve as a formal introduction to Latin poetry, especially epic, if not an introduction to Vergil himself.  Finally, we shall explore various approaches to the poem—for example, as mythical narrative, as Augustan propaganda, as a Homeric sequel.  Towards this end, you will read the entire poem in English, and write two interpretive essays.

Objectives.  The specific goals for this course are as follows:     Furthermore, students will obtain and exercise the following skills:
Texts.
    Required:
        Gould, H. E., and Whiteley, J. L. (1946)  Virgil:  Aeneid I.  Bristol-Focus.
        Fitzgerald, R. (1984)  Virgil:  The Aeneid.  Vintage.
    Recommended:
        The Pocket Oxford Latin Dictionary.

Requirements, Grading, Expectations, and Policies.
 
Essays
Exams
Assignments
Summaries
Meter Projects 
Participation
 
Timetable
 
Two essays (7.5% each):  15%
I have assigned two interpretive essays for this semester (dates given in the Timetable).  You will receive the topics in advance, along with recommended bibliography from the reserve desk.  These essays are not research papers per se—a more accurate term is reaction paper, because I am more interested in reading your views and analyses of the plays—but you should consult and cite secondary sources where appropriate.  In general, I will hold you to the standards advocated on the Skidmore Classics homepage, in the section on Writing Essays and Research Papers.  The papers themselves must be 4-5 pages, typed, double-spaced, and free of mechanical and grammatical errors.
First midterm examination:  15%
Second midterm examination (20 November):  15%
Final examination (16 December):  15%
There are three examinations:  two midterms and a final.  The final is essentially a third midterm, although it will have some cumulative aspects.  More information on each test as its date approaches.
  • First Midterm with solution (21 October)
  • Final Exam guidelines (16 December)
  • Short assignments:  5%
    A short assignment—such as a problem to solve, a topic to consider, additional reading, and the like—will be given neary every class.  Some must be handed in (in which case they must be prepared like the essays, above);  others are designed to facilitate discussion.  Whatever the case, all assignments are due on or before the following class meeting.
  • Scansion Assignment 1 with solution (12 October)
  • Scansion Assignment 2 with solution (19 October)
  • Peer Teaching
  • Aeneid summaries:  5%
    As an ongoing project, you will read the entire Aeneid in English during the course of the term, at the rate of one book per week.  We shall devote class time to the discussion of each book, so I expect you to keep up with the reading.  In fact, every week, starting 21 September, you will turn in a brief summary (1 page, formatted as an essay) of the previous week’s book to me.  Simply recount in your own words what happened in the book:  who did what, and when, and why, and so on.  Consult the Timetable for the schedule of books to be read.
    Meter Projects:  10%
    We will spend a good deal of time reviewing the shape and sound of the dactylic hexameter, the meter in which the Aeneid is composed.  One project that will help in this endeavor is a memorization assignment, in which you will commit to memory a 8-10 line chunk of the poem—from a book other than book 1.  You are responsible for choosing your chunk (you must report it to me by 16 November).  See below for details.  Let me just say here that the passages must be evenly spread throughout the poem.  You will have two opportunities to recite your passage, an informal one in my office during the week of 30 November, and a formal one during a special meeting of the class, perhaps in week before exams.
    Class participation:  20%
    Class participation involves more than just attendance.  You must also keep up with the readings and assignments, and participate actively in class discussion.  Furthermore, I expect that you will come to class on time and that you will maintain an environment that promotes the exchange of ideas.  From time to time, I shall ask individual students to prepare a short presentation for the next class;  such presentations will count toward the class participation grade.

    In my language classes I am rather strict about the way translation is conducted.  First, I ask that you not write translations of any kind, nor any grammatical notes, in your texts.  This may be done elsewhere, of course, in a notebook or on flash cards or via some other system.  Second, when you are called upon to translate, please do not read from a prepared translation.  You will learn best by looking at the Latin—and only the Latin.  To encourage the treading of a straight-and-narrow path, I am offering an extra-credit bounty (5%) at the end of term to any and all who can demonstrate to me that they have employed a systematic approach to memorizing vocabulary and grammar.

    My attendance/late work policy is as follows.  Attendance is taken each class.  You are allowed two "free" unexcused absences from class over the course of the semester.  Further unexcused absences will lower your class participation grade at the rate of one grade per absence.  Two late arrivals to class will count as one absence.  Unexcused absences from an exam or presentation will incur the grade of F, as will unexcused late papers, assignments, or projects.  To excuse absences or late work you must furnish documentation from a credible authority—doctor, clergy member, professor, dean, and so on—who can testify to the nature of your emergency.  I shall also appreciate advance notification whenever possible.

    If you have any questions or comments regarding these requirements and policies, please let me know.

    Timetable.  I expect our reading pace to be about 25 lines of book 1 per class.  Mondays and Wednesdays will be our major reading and translating days, while Fridays will be devoted mainly to other issues:  meter, discussion, and the like.  I will email schedules for the subsequent week every Friday.
     
    SEPT
    OCT I
    OCT II
    NOV
    DEC
     
    DATE
    LATIN
    ENGLISH
    TURN IN
    SPECIAL
    Sept    9
          Introduction
    11
    1-8      
    14
    9-22      
    16
    23-49      
    18
    50-75      
    21
    76-101 Book 1 Summary of  book 1  
    23
    102-28      
    25
           
    28
    128-56 Book 2 Summary of  book 2  
    30
    157-83      
    DATE
    LATIN
    ENGLISH
    TURN IN
    SPECIAL
    Oct    2
           
        5
    184-209 Book 3 Summary of  book 3  
    7
    210-37      
    9
      Book 4 Summary of  book 4  
    12
    238-66   Scansion Assignment 1  
    14
    267-96      
    16
      Book 5 Summary of  book 5  
    19
    297-320   Scansion Assignment 2  
    21
          First midterm
     
    OCTOBER
    DATE
    LATIN
    ENGLISH
    TURN IN
    SPECIAL
    23
          Rebuilding the course
    26
          STUDY DAY (no classes)
    28
    314-34 (328-34:  Ball) Book 6 Summary of book 6  
    30
    335-56 (343-47:  Domin)   First essay  
     
    NOVEMBER
    DATE
    LATIN
    ENGLISH
    TURN IN
    SPECIAL
    2
    357-77 (365-70:  Hohmann)  
    4
    378-401 (390-5:  Zalman)      
    6
    (402-6:  Gray)  Book 7 Summary of book 7   
    9
    407-36 (430-6:  Olson)      
    11
    437-68 (453-8:  Newton)      
    13
    (469-73:  Fish) Book 8 Summary of book 8  
    16
    474-504 (483-9:  Kitlas)   Recitation selection  
    18
    505-38 (505-112: Millman) Book 9 Summary of book 9  
    20
          Second midterm
    23
    539-68 (544-9:  Morrow)      
    25
    569-602 (594-602:  Power)  
    27
          THANKSGIVING BREAK
    30
    603-30 (615-22:  Kugler)     Informal recitations this week
     
    DECEMBER
    DATE
    LATIN
    ENGLISH
    TURN IN
    SPECIAL
    2
     631-56 (647-52:  Robts-F.)  
    4
    (657-62:  Burrill)  
    7
     663-94 (683-8:  Kosloff) Formal recitations this week
    9
    695-722 (697-702:  Mitchell)      
    11
    723-755  Books 10, 11, 12 Summary 10, 11, 12  
    16
         Second essay Final examination, 9:00 a.m.