CL200: The Classical World
TLC 301, MWF 11.15-12.10

Greek, early (Orientalizing).
Proto-Attic Amphora: Blinding of Polyphemus (from Eleusis), c. 670 BC
Eleusis Museum



 
 

Prof. Michael Arnush, x5462, Harder Hall 208A, Office hours M2-3 W1-2

This course serves as an introduction to classical antiquity for students pursuing studies in ancient Greece and Rome, for those interested in the classical tradition and the impact of the study of antiquity on Medieval and Renaissance Europe, and for those seeking a general background in the western tradition. The centerpiece of the course will be an examination of Greek and Latin literature within their larger social contexts. Readings (in English) will include Greek and Latin epic, tragic poetry, letters and orations; history and historiography; and philosophical and political treatises. The physical remains of classical antiquity, theoretical issues, and the classical tradition in the Middle Ages and Renaissance will also undergo scrutiny.

The theme for this year's "Classical World" course is "community." Through the examination and analysis of art and texts, we will focus on the ways in which the Greeks and Romans constructed their communities, who could belong and who could not, the values upon which their communities were predicated, the lengths they would go to reenter and/or to protect their created communities, and the ways in which their ideals of community have been preserved and passed on to us. Members of the course interested in pursuing the issue of "community" in greater depth, specifically with respect to the ancient Greek and Roman construct of the "family," are invited to enroll in HF200: The Classical World: Honors (LI 442 Th 4.00-5.00).

Faculty Lecturers:

Michael Arnush, Classics (history)
Daniel Curley, Classics (literature)
Giuseppe Faustini, Italian (literature)
Frank Gonzalez, Philosophy (philosophy)
Kate Greenspan, English (literature)
Dan Hurwitz, Mathematics (mathematics)
Leslie Mechem, Classics (art and archaeology)
Michael Mudrovic, Spanish (literature)
Charles Segal, Classics, Harvard University (literature)
Jeffrey Segrave, Physical Education (athletics)
Marc-Andre Wiesmann, French (literature)
Course Objectives:

Goals

Skills

COURSE SPECIFICS

REQUIRED TEXTS COURSE REQUIREMENTS READING SCHEDULE
WEBSITES OF INTEREST JAN. FEB. MAR. APR.-MAY
CHATROOM
CHATROOM CONTRIBUTIONS
FIRST ESSAY CRITIQUES
TREASURE HUNT II
FINAL PAPERS