Skidmore College
CL 302:  Private Lives, Private Worlds
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Semester project:  reconstructing private life
 
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Semester project
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Course syllabusCourse timetableOnline resourcesReturn to the CL 302 homepage
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Phase I (15 Feb)
Phase II (8 Mar)
Phase III (16 Apr)
Phase IV (10 May, 12:00 p.m.)

Select bibliography

   Latest phases
| T. Ball ||
A. Carballo
D. Gilmour
E. Hohmann
M. Kugler
T. Power

Web writing assignments
Saving your pages on the Skidmore web server
Editing your pages on the Skidmore web server
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Our ongoing project this term will be to create a virtual reconstruction of Roman private life.  Within this vast area of study each student will be assigned a particular topic, upon which he or she will report (via the WWW) throughout the semester.

The topics for this project are as follows (links to the main page of each topic):

I had conceived of a Roman women topic;  but many of the above are gynocentric, and, besides, there is already a fine website,  Diotima, devoted to women in the ancient world.

The project has four phases, each with specific guidelines and requirements:

blank Phase I: ends 15 February
Phase II: ends 8 March
Phase III: ends 16 April
Phase IV: ends 10 May, 12:00 p.m.
Although you should be sure to read the guidelines for all phases, each is essentially a set period of time for you to update your presentation.  Working in an electronic medium will bring with each phase gradual improvements not only to the substance or content of the reports, but also to their form and feel.  Furthermore, link technology allows for non-linear presentation:  you will want to think carefully about how your pages are connected, so as to enable a truly interactive experience for your reader.
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Phase I:  Outline and Overview

Due:  Monday, 15 February by 12:30 p.m.

Having chosen your topic, you must now decide which aspects, or sub-topics, you will cover throughout the semester.  Spend some time with the books in our Bibliography, and identify the major subjects within your topic.  A few hours with at least three different works should do the trick.  You might also consult our online Resources page.

The era of your topic is basically the late Republic to the early Empire, which is a generally cohesive period, and for which we have the most information.  It may be the case, however, that your topic requires you to treat the Republic and Empire separately.

Once you have determined your subtopics, create a web page which introduces your topic.  In one paragraph, state and describe your topic.  Then, in a series of paragraphs, describe your subtopics, one paragraph per subtopic.  Aim for about four to six sentences in each.  The goal is that your reader come away with a sense of what your project is about—from what you are presenting to how, and even why.

Your web page must also feature a menu akin to the one required in web writing assignment II.  The menu must have as many items as there are subtopics, plus a link to your introductory paragraph.

As far as format goes, please observe the following:

  • White background only.
  • Font must be Arial, 12 point, black.
  • All text must be left-aligned, except for the menu, which must be centered.
  • No graphics, pictures, or other embellishments.
I impose these strictures only because the ultimate phase of this project requires all of the pages to be linked to a single, cohesive website.  To insure cohesion later on, it is best to generate rather generic pages now.

When you have completed your page, please email me the URL.  Refer back to the CL 302 web writing page for help on saving pages or editing pages.

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Phase II:  FiIling In

Due:  Monday, 8 March by 12:30 p.m.

In this phase you will continue to develop the content of your page(s), while paying some attention to formatting.

Spend some time with the books in our newly expanded  Bibliography, and flesh out the major subjects within your topic.  You may do this across the board, adding information to each subject, or you may vertically expand one subject, giving it greater depth.  Concentrate on the text—images will come soon.

Remember also to consult our online Resources page, or browse the web in search of helpful sites.

Your web page(s) must be formatted like web writing assignment III.  If you did not achieve perfection in that assignment, you may try to do so here.  Remember, however, that content comes first.  If I detect a lack of substance in your page, your grade for this phase will reflect this lack.

Moreover, after this phase I will ask you all to meet together as a group and agree upon a format to which subsequent phases will adhere.

When you have completed your page, please email me the URL.  Refer back to the CL 302 web writing page for help on saving pages or editing pages.

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Phase III:  FiIling Out

Due:  Friday, 16 April by 5:00 p.m.

In this phase you will continue to develop the content of your page(s), incorporating the formatting agreed upon at your last peer meeting, and now adding images.

Continue to use the books in our Bibliography and flesh out the major subjects within your topic.  Once again, you may do this across the board, adding information to each subject, or you may vertically expand one subject, giving it greater depth.

Remember also to consult our online Resources page, or browse the web in search of helpful sites.  Take a look at a site I just discovered, the Web Developer's Virtual Library (WDVL), which purports to be a comprehensive guide to the construction of web pages.  Best of all is their Beginner's Page, which uses plain language.

Also in this phase you should begin to incorporate images along the lines of web writing assignment IV.  If you need help with copyrights, please see me.  Remember, however, that textual content comes first.  If I detect a lack of substance in your page, your grade for this phase will reflect this lack.

Remember to use the universal class format during this phase.

When you have completed your page, please email me the URL.  Refer back to the CL 302 web writing page for help on saving pages or editing pages.

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Select Bibliography.

Most titles on 3-hour open reserve at Scribner Library.  Titles marked with (­) must be requested at the reserve desk.

  Adam, J.-P.  (1994) Roman building:  materials and techniques
Adkins, L. and R. Adkins.  (1994) Handbook to life in ancient Rome
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Aries, P. and G. Duby. (edd.)  (1987) A history of private life (many vol.)
Balsdon, J. P. V. B.  (1963) Roman women:  their history and habits
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Bettini, M.  (1991) Anthropology and Roman culture:  kinship, time, images of the soul
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Bradley, K. R.  (1991) Discovering the Roman family: studies in Roman social history
Carcopino, J.  (1947) Daily life in ancient Rome;  the people and the city at the height of the empire
Dixon, S.  (1991) Roman family
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Dixon, S.  (1988) Roman mother
Dobson, M., D. Harvey, and J. Wilkins.  (edd.)  (1995) Food in antiquity
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Elsner, J.  (ed.)  (1996) Art and text in Roman culture
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Fantham, E. et al.  (1994) Women in the classical world: image and text
Friedlander, L.  (1968) Roman life and manners under the early empire  (2 vol.)
Gardner, J. and T. Wiedemann.  (1991) Roman household:  a sourcebook
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Gardner, J.  (1986) Women in Roman law & society
Garnsey, P.  (1987) Roman empire:  economy, society, and culture
Gazda, E. K. (ed.)  (1991) Roman art in the private sphere:  new perspectives on the architecture and decor of the domus, villa, and insula
Glover, T. R.  (1924) Life and letters in the fourth century
Grant, M.  (1979) Art and life of Pompeii and Herculaneum
Griffin, J.  (1986) Latin poets and Roman life
Hallett, J.  P.  (1984) Fathers and daughters in Roman society:  women and the elite family
Hallett, J. P. & M. B. Skinner.  (edd.)  (1997) Roman sexualities
Harris, W. V.  (1989) Ancient literacy
Hawley, R. and B.  Levick.  (edd.)  (1995) Women in antiquity:  new assessments
Hooper, F. and M. Schwartz.  (edd.)  (1991) Roman letters:  history from a personal point of view
Kertzer, D.  I. and R. P. Saller.  (edd.)  (1991) Family in Italy from antiquity to the present
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Kleiner, D. and  S. B. Matheson.  (edd.)  (1996) I, Claudia:  women in ancient Rome
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Lefkowitz, M. R. & M. B. Fant.  (1982) Women's life in Greece and Rome
McDaniel, W. B.  (1963) Roman private life and its survivals
McKay, A. G.  (1975) Houses, villas, and palaces in the Roman world
McClees, H.  (1933) Daily life of the Greeks and Romans as illustrated in the classical collections
Moxnes, H.  (ed.)  (1997) Constructing early Christian families:  family as social reality and metaphor
Ogilvie, R. M.  (1969) Romans and their gods in the age of Augustus
Percival, J.  (1976) Roman villa:  an historical introduction
Pomeroy, S. B.  (ed.)  (1991) Women's history and ancient history
Rawson, B.  (ed.)  (1986) Family in ancient Rome:  new perspectives
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Rawson, B.  (ed.)  (1991) Marriage, divorce, and children in ancient Rome
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Rawson, B.  and P. Weaver. (edd.)  (1997) Roman family in Italy:  status, sentiment, space
Rogers, H. L. and T. R. Harley. Roman home life and religion
Saller, R. P.  (1994) Patriarchy, property, and death in the Roman family
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Shelton, J.  (1988) As the Romans did:  a source book in Roman social history
Smith, J. T.  (1997) Roman villas:  a study in social structure
Stambough, J. E.  (1988)  Ancient Roman city
Staples, A.  (1998) From good goddess to vestal virgins:  sex and category in Roman religion
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Toynbee, J. M. C.  (1971) Death and burial in the Roman world
Wedeck, H. E.  (1980) Roman morals:  a survey of depravity
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Wiedemann, T.  (1989) Adults and children in the Roman empire

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Last modified 26 March 1999