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CL 310 : Quizzes
Introduction Format Quiz 1 Quiz 2 Quiz 3 Quiz 4
Introduction.
 

Take-home quizzes on Catullus' style, syntax, and grammar will be assigned throughout the term: four quizzes in all, one after each reading unit.

Quizzes must be completed and submitted by the specified date, either in person or via email (MS Word attachments, please).

   

 
   
Format.
 

Each quiz will ask students to re-read the poems to locate and explicate specific grammatical or syntactic constructions (e.g., purpose clauses, result clauses, gerundives) and poetic devices (e.g., alliteration, catalogs).  Each quiz also calls for scansion and a modest (3-4 paragraph) essay.  STUDENTS MUST WORK ENTIRELY ON THEIR OWN.

For grammatical or syntactical constructions students should do the following:

1.   Quote as much of the construction as needed in order to demonstrate that it has been located successfully.  If, however, the construction is a subordinate clause, as a general rule some of the main clause (which usually "triggers" the subordinate clause) should be included for context.  By citing only the necessary components of a construction, students reveal themselves as careful and discerning readers.

2.   Identify quotations by poem/line references (e.g., "Cat. 64.211-212").

3.   Provide a translation of the quotation, which should be as accurate as possible.  Be sure to translate only what is quoted.  Students should translate in their own words.

4.   Identify and discuss the essentials of the construction.  If the construction is a subordinate clause, be sure to relate it back to the main clause.

IMPORTANT:  Students should consult the Guide to subordinate clauses (44k, MS Word format) when formulating discussion, especially as regards the essential elements and functions of such constructions.

For poetic devices students should follow the same format as for constructions, quoting, identifying, translating, and discussing the examples they have located.

Essays may be brief, but should be supported with evidence from the poems themselves.

GRADING:

  • Each construction is worth 10 points:  three for locating the construction, two for quoting it correctly, two for translating it, and three for discussing it.
  • Each poetic device is woth five points:  one for identifying the device, one for quoting it, one for translating it, and two for discussing it.
  • Each line of scansion is work five points.
  • Each essay is worth 40 points unless otherwise specified.
   
Quiz 1.
 

Due:  Friday, September 26, 5:00 p.m.
Coverage:  Catullus 1, 14, 22, 36, 42, 50, 95, 105, 116

A.  Constructions.  Locate and explicate examples of the following:

1 ablative of comparison
1 accusative of exclamation
1 partitive genitive
1 gerundive
1
jussive subjunctive
1 subjunctive condition
1 indirect command
2 indirect statements

B.  Poetic devices.  Locate and explicate examples of the following:

1 syncopated (abbreviated) verb
2 learned mythological references
2 Catullan "buzzwords" that denote ideal poetry
1 other device of your choice

C.  Scansion.

Cat. 14.1-5 (can be printed out and turned in separately, or scanned with a scanner and emailed).

D.  Essay.

You are eager to establish a friendship with Catullus, and so you decide to write him a poem.  What kind of poetry — in terms of subject matter, content, form, function — would you compose in order to curry favor with him?

   
Quiz 2.
 

Due:  Friday, October 24, 5:00 p.m.
Coverage:  Catullus 2a, 2b, 3, 5, 7, 8, 11, 16, 38, 43, 51, 59, 60, 70
Coverage:  Catullus 72, 75, 76, 79, 83, 85, 86, 87, 92, 107, 109

A.  Constructions.  Locate and explicate examples of the following:

1 dative of possession
1 ablative time construction
1 ablative of degree of difference
1 tantum...quantum correlation
1 indicative cum-clause

1 subjunctive cum-clause
1 purpose clause
1 result clause
1 subjunctive indirect command

2 indirect statements

B.  Poetic devices.  Locate and explicate examples of the following:

1 syncopated (abbreviated) verb
1 learned mythological reference
1 Catullan "buzzword" that denotes ideal friendship

C.  Scansion.

Cat. 8.12-9

D.  Essay.

"What did the liberated lady herself think of her puritanical admirer? As usual, 'Lesbia' is a shadowy figure."  (Wiseman 1985, 172)

After reading most of the poems in Catullus' Lesbia cycle, what have you learned (or think you have learned) about his puella in terms of her personality, her upbringing, and her station?

   
Quiz 3.
 

Due:  Friday, November 14, 5:00 p.m.
Coverage:  Catullus 10, 24, 29, (31,) 39, 48, 49, 53, 56, 57, 69, 81, 84,
Coverage:  Catullus 88, 89, 90, 93, 97, 99, 100, 101

A.  Constructions.  Locate and explicate examples of the following:

1 partitive genitive
1 descriptive genitive
1 subjunctive cum-clause
1 subjunctive condition
1 indirect question
2 indirect statements

B.  Scansion.

Cat. 69.5-10

C.  Essay.

What are Catullus' social values, positive or negative?  To support your assertions, use individual poems as examples, and quote Latin words and phrases from those poems.

   
Quiz 4.
 

Due:  Friday, December 5, 5:00 p.m.
Coverage:  Catullus 64.1-75, 112-183; 68a 1-40; 68b 41-100

A.  Constructions.  Locate and explicate examples of the following:

1 ablative absolute
1 ablative time construction
1 dative of possession
1 tantum-quantum or (talis)-qualis correlation
1 indirect statement
1 indirect question
1 purpose clause
1 subjunctive cum-clause

B.  Poetic devices.  Locate and explicate examples of the following:

1 syncopated verb
1 learned mythological reference
1 hysteron-proteron
1 transferred epithet
1 other device of your choice

C.  Scansion.

Cat. 64.139-146

NOTE:  For this scansion, indicate foot-divisions ( | ) and the principal caesura ( || ) in every line.  On a separate page, briefly explain why each principal caesura belongs where it does.

     
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