Resources for the Study of Roman History
Texts

Requirements

Cultural Materials

Syllabus

September
October
November
December
MWF 1.25-2.20 BO 281
Prof. Michael Arnush Ladd 209 x5462

CHATROOM

Students in this course will explore the social, political, economic and artistic contributions of the Romans to western civilization. Using literary, historical and archaeological methodologies, students will examine the history of Rome from its foundation by the mythical Romulus to its preeminence in the Mediterranean world for over 1000 years. Through readings, discussions and essays, students will demonstrate proficiency in the details that comprise Roman history, and an understanding of such broad topics as the elegance of Etruscan civilization, Roman relations with foreign nations, social and political institutions, imperialism, the golden age of Latin literature, and the spread of Christianity.

Students in HI202 Roman History will demonstrate the ability

  • to read critically and analyze closely literary texts and modern scholarship 
  • to read and analyze historical documents within their social contexts and evaluate the role of the individual in ancient cultures
  • to conduct research by traditional and digital methods 
  • to present orally and in written form an argument supported by primary and secondary sources
  • to develop multi- and cross-cultural perspectives and apply them to gender, ethnic and social issues



 
She-Wolf, ca. 500 BC, bronze
Museo Capitolino, Rome
Courtesy R. Scaife, VRoma

"... after the floating cradle in which the boys had been exposed had been left by the retreating water on dry land, a thirsty she-wolf ... came to them, gave them her teats to suck and was so gentle towards them that the king's flock-master found her licking the boys with her tongue. He took the children to his hut and gave them to his wife Larentia to bring up. Some writers think that Larentia, from her unchaste life, had got the nickname of Lupa amongst the shepherds, and that this was the origin of the marvelous story ...." (Livy, ab urbe condita 1.4)

 
Contact:
Michael Arnush
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Maintained by Michael Arnush, Classics Department
Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, NY, 12866
518 580-5462