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CG311 Greek Prose: Herodotus' Histories

Prof. Michael Arnush Ladd 209 x5462
marnush@skidmore.edu Hours: MF 12-1
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LEXICAL RESOURCES: PERSEUS & OKUS

The most valuable electronic resource for this course is Perseus, a database of linguistic, literary, historical and archaeological materials related to the study of ancient Greece. You will use Perseus extensively in this course, not only as a means of exploring the cultural setting of Herodotus and his subject matter, but as well to strengthen your linguistic skills. All of Herodotus' text is available in English and Greek on-line and each word in the Greek text is parsed and linked to an electronic version of Liddell and Scott's Intermediate Greek-English Lexicon.

Perseus:

A second linguistic tool available is Okus, which provides morphological parsing of virtually the entire text of Herodotus' Histories (and many other Greek literary works). One word of caution: my experience has shown that Okus has the occasional error, so be prepared to double-check in Perseus or your printed materials.

Okus:

You should use these tools as you prepare the text for each class meeting, for they will allow you to eliminate any confusion you might have about the form and meaning of each vocabulary word.

 

You also have four printed dictionaries at your disposal:

  • the Intermediate Greek-English Lexicon, known as the "Middle Liddell," purchased for this seminar;
  • the Elementary Greek-English Lexicon ("Little Liddell");
  • A Greek-English Lexicon ("Big Liddell" or "Great Scott,"), by H.G. Liddell, R. Scott, H.S. Jones and R. McKenzie;

all published by Oxford University Press and in the Reference section of Scribner Library. Each has its merits and you may well discover that reading Herodotus with a printed dictionary at your side is more conducive to learning vocabulary than using electronic links.

The fourth dictionary is specific to Herodotus' text, A Lexicon to Herodotus, by J.E. Powell and published by Georg Olms Verlag in Germany in 1938. Unlike the various "Liddell" dictionaries, this lexicon is specific to Herodotus' text only. If at any point you cannot make sense of Herodotus' use of a word, Powell should serve as your ultimate source. How to use Powell's Lexicon.

 
WEB RESOURCES: OTHER PERSEUS TOOLS; REFERENCE WORKS; MAPS
 

PERSEUS TOOLS

 
REFERENCE WORKS
 
MAPS
 
OTHER TOOLS