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observations

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When David met Ronald by Prof. Giuseppe Faustini


letters

Choosing low-down over upscale
In light of plans to enrich Skidmore’s “residential experience” [spring Scope], I feel torn. Kimball Hall’s coed third floor was hands-down the best introduction to college life that I could have had. Prior to renovations to rid Kimball of its rankness, my beloved frosh dorm had the low-down look. Our hallways resonated with wild chanting during Nintendo football tournaments. Some of the boys had the habit of passing out in the girls’ bathrooms. One morning the hall was littered with bottles, pizza boxes, busted chairs, and unidentifiable kernels; another morning, the stairwell was clouded in the yellowish contents of a fire extinguisher. These [may have been common occurrences] in dorms campuswide, but only in Kimball could you get away with drawing in chalk on the crusty, eggshell walls (at Skidmore, it was art).
I do not condone vandalism, and I applaud the environmental efficiency promised in the new buildings, but I also remember how sweet it was to be offered a crash course in south-quad dorm life, rather than sleek, modern and “more mature, upscale living.” The social quality of Kimball that supported doorway polo practices, and a guy riding his bike in a continuous circle, was priceless. That ghetto is in my college memories, and nothing can change that.

Jennifer A. Sheffield ’03
Hicksville, N.Y.


Wartime classmates
[Contrary to the names suggested in the summer Scope’s “Who, What, When” answer], I know that’s Joan Eggers [Winston] ’44 and Vinny Corona [Dick] ’44 in the photo. It was during the war, and we were doing our own housekeeping. We all worked pretty hard during those years—in the Victory Gardens, the kitchen, the cafeteria… [It was long ago] but we’re still here.

Marion Whiting Brandon ’44
West Chester, Pa.