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Skidmore College
Gender Studies
Gwen D'Arcangelis

Gwen D'Arcangelis
Assistant Professor

Office: Ladd Hall # 211
Telephone: 518-580-8078
Email: gdarcang@skidmore.edu

Courses

  • Introduction to Gender Studies
  • Feminist Theories and Methodologies
  • Senior Seminar in Gender Studies
  • Feminist Science Studies

Biography

Gwen D’Arcangelis earned her B.A. in Neurobiology from the University of Pennsylvania and her Ph.D. in Women’s Studies at UCLA. She joined the Skidmore faculty in 2016. Her areas of teaching and research include gender, race, and science; feminist science fiction; disease and empire; and feminist and anti-imperial praxis. She has published on the construction of white scientific masculinity in U.S. national security discourse, gendered Orientalism in the U.S. news media during the 2003 SARS disease scare, and on the new forms of security and surveillance in the U.S. biosciences that the War on Terror precipitated. She is currently working on an article chronicling nurse activism during the War on Terror, as well as a book-length manuscript tentatively titled, The War on Bioterror: Neo-colonial regimes of protection, progress, and care, which explores the role that the biosciences and public health—and their gendered and raced dimensions—have played in expanding U.S. Empire during the War on Terror. She has also been involved in community engagement projects on queer Asian Pacific Islander justice and environmental justice, and has blogged on topics of science justice.

More about her current projects can be found at Gwen DArcangelis or on her C.V.

Publications

  • “Confronting public health imperialism: A transnational feminist analysis of critical nurse response to the National Smallpox Vaccination Program of 2002” (in-progress)

  • “Reframing the ‘Securitization of Public Health’: a Critical Race Perspective on Post-9/11 Bioterrorism Preparedness in the U.S.,” Critical Public Health, 2016,http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09581596.2016.1209299.

  • “Defending White Scientific Masculinity: The FBI, the Media and Profiling Tactics During the Post-9/11 Anthrax Investigation,” International Feminist Journal of Politics, June 15, 2015, 1–20. doi:10.1080/14616742.2015.1051330.

  • “Enacting Environmental Justice through the Undergraduate Classroom: the Transformative Potential of Community Engaged Partnerships” (with Brinda Sarathy), Journal of Community Engagement and Scholarship 8, no. 2 (2015): 97-106.

  • “Surveillance and Policing in U.S. Bioscience—producing transnational Others,” in Shifting Positionalities: The Local and International Geo–Politics of Surveillance and Policing, ed. by María Amelia Viteri and Aaron Tobler, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2009.

  • “Chinese chickens, ducks, pigs and humans, and the Technoscientific Discourses of Global U.S. Empire,” in Tactical Biopolitics: Art, Activism, and Technoscience, ed. by Beatriz da Costa and Kavita Philip, Cambridge: MIT Press, 2008.

  • “Interview with Richard Lewontin” (with Beatriz da Costa and Kavita Philip), in Tactical Biopolitics: Art, Activism, and Technoscience, ed. by Beatriz da Costa and Kavita Philip, Cambridge: MIT Press, 2008.

  • “Prison abolition in practice: The LEAD Project, the politics of healing, and ‘A New Way of Life’” (with Shigematsu, Setsu and Melissa Burch), in Abolition NOW! Ten Years of Strategy and Struggle Against the Prison Industrial Complex, ed. by CR10 Publications Collective, Oakland: AK Press, 2008.