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SPRING 2009 COURSES

Please note that spring 2009 is the last time we expect to offer BI240 Environmental Biology since this course will no longer be required under the new ES major. If you are an ES-Environmental Science track major who needs BI 240 or an ES-Social and Cultural track/ES minor who wants to take BI 240, please be sure to enroll in the course this spring.

Please note that we have several special topics that do not appear on the master schedule list for ES. Please see the description of these courses below.

Courses for the new ES major (for Class of 2012)
Courses for the old ES major (for Classes of 2009-2011)
Courses for the new ES minor (for Class of 2012)
Courses for the old ES minor (for Class of 2009-2011)
Special Topics Course Descriptions

Courses for the new ES Major (for Class of 2012)
Social and Cultural Perspectives Track (for Class of 2012)

Foundation Courses:

Core Courses:

Cluster A Courses:

Cluster B1 Courses:

Capstone Course:

Methods Courses:

Environmental Science Track (for Class of 2012)

Foundation Course:

Disciplinary Foundation Courses:

Cluster A Courses:

Cluster B2 Courses:

Capstone Course:

Methods Courses:

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Courses for the old ES Major (for Class of 2009-2011)
Social and Cultural Perspectives Track (for Class of 2009-2011)

Foundation Courses:

Cluster A Courses:

Cluster B1 Courses:

BI 240 Environmental Biology
GE 112 Introduction to Oceanography
GE 208 Origin and Distribution of Natural Resources
GE 251 Geology Topics: Current Events
GE 351 Applied Geology: Current Events
Cluster C Courses:

Note: The ES Program will consider counting one or more Cluster C courses toward your Cluster A requirements. Please consult your advisor and/or Karen Kellogg, Director of ES, if you would like to make a request for substitution.

Capstone Course:

Environmental Science Track (for Class of 2009-2011)

Foundation Courses:

Core Courses:

Cluster A Courses:

Cluster B2 Courses:

Cluster C Courses:

Note: The ES Program will consider counting one or more Cluster C courses toward your Cluster A requirements. Please consult your advisor and/or Karen Kellogg, Director of ES, if you would like to make a request for substitution.

Capstone Course:

Other Courses:

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Courses for the new ES Minor (for Class of 2012)
Social and Cultural Perspectives Track (for Class of 2012)

Foundation Courses:

Cluster A Courses:

Cluster B1 Courses:

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Courses for the old ES Minor (for Class of 2009-2011)

Foundation Courses:

Cluster A Courses:

Cluster B1 Courses:

Cluster C Courses:

Note: The ES Program will consider counting one or more Cluster C courses toward your Cluster A requirements. Please consult your advisor and/or Karen Kellogg, Director of ES, if you would like to make a request for substitution.

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Special Topics Course Descriptions

AM 103W Introduction to American Studies: Nature and American Culture
This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary study of American culture by focusing on the relationship between Americans and nature. We will explore the ways in which Americans, past and present, have thought about nature, and we will examine how these beliefs about the natural world have influenced politics and power relations, shaped the landscape, and contributed to ideas about national identity. Additionally, we will consider how gender, race, and class influence understandings of and relationships with the natural, non-human world. Using historical, literary, philosophical, and popular texts, as well as art, music, film, and material culture, we will explore wilderness ideologies, expansionism, managed nature and cultivation, consumption, foodways, urbanization, and environmental movements.

EC 361 The Economics of Climate Change
Climate change is arguably the biggest global environmental issue we shall have to face over this century. Rising temperatures, changes in hydrological cycles, and subsequent pressures on ecosystems’ health pose a threat to the well-being of humans and other species. The economics of climate change attempts to offer insights on the design and implementation of policies aimed at mitigating the potential impacts of a warming climate. It also aims at understanding the prospects of adaptive measures and, given the strong correlation between fossil fuel combustion and climate change, also deals with the evaluation of alternative energy policies. In this course we will examine these roles of economics. Starting with an introduction to the scientific basics of climate change and the likely and less-likely impacts that we may foresee, we will discuss how basic concepts of environmental and ecological economics apply to the climate change problem. The general economic principles will then be used to analyze selected applications, such as the impacts of climate change on agriculture and food security, lifestyles, human health, species loss and energy use. Critical discussions of current domestic and international policy initiatives - like the one proposed in the Kyoto protocol - and of economic models used in the evaluation of policy prescriptions will constitute an important component of the course. (prereq.: EC 104 Introduction to Microeconomics)

ED 261C Environmental Education
Environmental education is at the heart of any attempt to solve environmental problems. Scientific, policy, and even economic approaches to environmental problems all rely on public knowledge and attitudes to succeed. And for long-run enduring change, arguably education is the only route. This class will introduce you to the nature, theory & justification of environmental education, with the young and old, and in formal and non-formal settings. As part of the course, you will work on a project of your choosing; evaluating resources, exploring local opportunities and developing curriculum for the age group, setting, and issues that most interests you.

ES 351 Special Topics in Environmental Studies: Environmental Art
From its roots in land art of the 1960’s to more recent ecological interventions, environmental art encompasses a range of approaches to connecting art with the environment. In this course, we will examine these approaches and question how they serve environmental concerns and current issues in art. Critical texts, such as Sue Spaid’s Ecovention: Current Issues to Transform Ecologies and Brian Wallis and Jeffery Kastner’s Land and Environmental Art, will guide our study as we explore environmental art through both theory and practice. Analytical writing assignments and a collaborative environmental art project will be required. Artists discussed will include Robert Smithson, Richard Long, Andy Goldsworthy, Agnes Denes, Mel Chin, and Lynne Hull. Prerequisites: ES100 or ES105 and AR131 or AR132 or permission of instructor.  Lab fee: $50

GE 251 Applied Geoscience Topics in Current Events
This course will investigate and analyze current events that relate to geoscience topics. The course will utilize case studies that may cover a variety of topics. The topics may range from global issues (such as energy and climate change) to regional issues (such as geohazards and groundwater issues). Many of the specific case studies will be determined by class interest. The goal of the course is to provide the knowledge and methods to allow students to understand the importance of geoscience topics in everyday life. Perquisite: One GE course.

GE 351 Applied Geoscience Topics in Current Events
This course will investigate and analyze current events that relate to geoscience topics. The course will utilize case studies that may cover a variety of topics. The topics may range from global issues (such as energy and climate change) to regional issues (such as geohazards and groundwater issues). Many of the specific case studies will be determined by class interest. As part of this course students will be responsible for extensively researching a case study and implementing a course module with the help of the instructor. The goal of the course is to provide the knowledge and methods to allow students to understand and to be able to research the importance of geoscience in everyday life. Prerequisite: Two GE courses.

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