Faculty   Minors   Courses
Latin American & Latinx Studies
 

Spring 2010 Courses

Latin American Credit

BI 325 TROPICAL ECOLOGY, 3 cr.TuTh, 12:40-2:00, M. Raveret-Richter
An introduction to the ecology of tropical regions, with an emphasis on Central and South American forests.  In this course, we will take an ecological approach to investigating the patterns, processes, and organisms characterizing tropical ecosystems.  We will study the forces that give rise to tropical biodiversity, and discuss both the preservation and destruction of tropical ecosystems.

FS 212 SPANISH AMERICAN LITERATURE, 4 cr.M, 2:30-4:20, B. Loyola
We will be reading Poetry, Narrative and Theatre from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.  Authors such as Dario Neruda, Mistral, Cortázar, Pax, Bombal, Rulfo, and Valenzuela will be studied.

FS 220 LANGUAGE ACROSS the CURRICULUM: Spanish, 1 cr,
     M, 1:25-2:20, C. Grant
     M, 1:25-2:20, V. Rangil
A course designed for students who want to use their Spanish language skills in any course taught in English at the college. Does not fulfill the Foreign Language distribution requirement or count toward the major or minor in Foreign Languages and Literatures.

FS 363-002 NATION BUILDING: 19th-CENTURY SPANISH AMERICAN WRITERS CONFRONT THE CHALLENGE, 3 cr. WF, 12:20-1:40, M. Lander
In this course students will analyze the texts by some of the most prominent writers of the period whose work explored issues of nation, identity, class and race.  Through different literary genres, students will look at how these texts prescribed, described, and formulated the concepts that contributed to the building of the Spanish American concept of "Nation."  The course includes films and novels that recreated the period such as Garcia Márquez's El general en su laberinto.  Some of the writers and thinkers that students will read are Simón Rodriguez, Esteban Echeverria, Ricardo Palma, and Teresa de la Parra, among others.

GO 209 LATIN AMERICAN PUZZLE, 4 cr. MWF, 9:05-10:00, A. Vacs 
A comprehensive analysis of Latin American political, social, and economic processes and institutions from a multidisciplinary perspective. The course examines Latin America's political development, ethnic problems, gender roles, and economic strategies as well as the changing role of institutions such as the state, socioeconomic organizations, the church, and the military. It considers how Latin American societies changed after independence while noting those political, social, and economic aspects that remain unchanged. 

GO 315 IMMIGRATION POLITICS, 4 cr.
TuTh, 12:40-2:00, R. Turner
An examination of immigration and the issues arising from it--the reshaping of cities, suburbs and rural areas, and the altering of racial dynamics, labor markets, politics and culture in the U.S.  Students will address varied topics such as the historical evolution of American immigration policy, theories of immigration, the economic costs and benefits of immigration, the assimilation of recent immigrants, and the future direction of U.S. immigration policy. 

HI 111:  INTRO TO LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY, 4 cr. TuTh, 12:40-2:00, J. Dym
An introduction to the economic, political, social, and intellectual history of Latin America. Organized thematically and chronologically, topics emphasize understanding the emergence of European colonies into a group of distinct nation-states. Students will explore Latin American society from initial encounters among Europeans, Africans, and Native Americans, through independence and political, economic, and social challenges of early nation-state formation. We conclude with the twentieth century, addressing topics such as industrialization, revolution, U.S.-Latin American relations, and selected intellectual trends.

HI 228C RACE, CLASS, & GENDER IN LATIN AMERICA, 4 cr.TuTh, 6:30-7:50, R. Lynch
Looks at how different ideas about race and ethnicity have shaped Latin American politics and societies from colonial times to the present.  Themes covered include: interactions of Iberian, American, African, and Asian peoples; official and unofficial management of multiethnic and multicultural societies; scientific racism; scientific racism; and the relation between theories of race and development of ideas about class, gender, and nation.

 

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