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Winter 2002

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Spring at the Tang

Original sketches by Rube Goldberg, ca. 1960

     Chain Reaction: Rube Goldberg and Contemporary Art, January 26–April 14. Quirky cartoons by Rube Goldberg, from the first half of the twentieth century, set the stage for modern artworks exploring similarly humorous mechanisms, gadgets, and thingamajigs. More than fifty original Goldbergs are included alongside work by William Bergman, Steven Brower, Diana Cooper, Roman de Salvo, Sam Easterson, Peter Fischli and David Weiss, Arthur Ganson, Tim Hawkinson, Martin Kersels, Alan Rath, Jovi Schnell, and Jeanne Silverthorne. The show was organized by Ian Berry, the Tang’s curator, in collaboration with the Williams College Museum of Art.

Disenvanchised Cheyenne by Bently Spang, 2001

     Staging the Indian: The Politics of Representation, February 2–June 2. Edward Curtis’s famous turn-of-the-century photographs of American Indians as a “disappearing race” are contrasted with works by six contemporary Native American artists. Along with selections from Skidmore’s own Curtis collection, the exhibit presents new works of video, photography, painting, and sculpture created in response to the Curtis images. The show was organized by Jill Sweet, professor of anthropology, with Tang curator Ian Berry. The exhibit catalogue includes writings by Sweet’s students, the curators, and other faculty and staff.

 


© 2001 Skidmore College