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Department of Chemistry
Skidmore College
815 North Broadway
Saratoga Springs
New York, 12866-1632


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518-580-5120

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Chemistry Courses

Click on the course that you are interested in or scroll down to see descriptions of all the courses.

Course Descriptions

CH 101. FUNDAMENTALS OF CHEMISTRY (3 credit hours)
An introductory course for students with little or no background in chemistry. It will emphasize the "language of chemistry" and will develop an ability to visualize processes on an atomic and molecular level. The problem sessions will further the students' skills in solving algebraic problems. While the course is primarily designed for those who wish to continue in science, it would also be appropriate for those who wish a one-semester survey of the subject. May not be used to satisfy major or minor requirements in chemistry or biology-chemistry. Prerequisite: QR1. (Fulfills QR2 requirement.)

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CH 103. FUNDAMENTALS OF CHEMISTRY WITH LAB (4 credit hours)
This course supplements the lectures of Chemistry 101 with a lab experience. Experiments are performed which illustrate the concepts presented in the lecture and problem sessions. May not be used to satisfy major or minor requirements in chemistry or biology-chemistry. Prerequisite: QR1. (Fulfills QR2 and natural sciences requirements.)

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CH 105. CHEMICAL PRINCIPLES I (4 credit hours)
Fundamental concepts of chemistry are presented. Emphasis is placed upon atomic and molecular structure, physical and chemical properties related to structure, periodic relationships, mass relationships, thermochemistry, and properties of solutions. The lab experiments provide applications of the principles. Students will take a general chemistry readiness exam the first day of class to assist the department in advising them for which course, CH105 or 105H, they are best prepared. Prerequisite: high-school algebra (two years), chemistry (one year) or CH101 or 103, and QR1. Three hours of lecture-discussion and one three-hour lab per week. (Fulfills QR2 and natural sciences requirements.) S. Frey, M. Frey

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CH 105H. CHEMICAL PRINCIPLES (4 credit hours)
Offers highly motivated students with strong chemistry backgrounds the opportunity to study fundamental concepts of chemistry in greater depth and breadth. Students will take a general chemistry readiness exam the first day of class to assist the department in advising them for which course, CH 105 or 105H, they are best prepared. Emphasis is placed upon atomic and molecular structure, physical and chemical properties related to molecular structure, orbital hybridization, periodic relationships, and introductory thermodynamics. Experiments are performed that illustrate the concepts presented in the lecture and problem sessions. Prerequisites: high school algebra (two years), chemistry (one year), and QR1. Three hours of lecture-discussion and one three-hour lab per week. (Fulfills QR2 and natural sciences requirements.) S. Frey, M. Frey

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CH 106. CHEMICAL PRINCIPLES II (4 credit hours)
Both theoretical and descriptive aspects of the chemistry of electrolytic solutions will be explored. The lecture material will be applied in the lab to the problems of inorganic synthesis, quantitative chemistry, and analytical separations. Prerequisite: CH105. Three hours of lecture-discussion and three hours of lab a week. S. Frey, M. Frey

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CH 106H. CHEMICAL PRINCIPLES II (4 credit hours)
The honors section of CH106 is a companion to CH105H and offers highly motivated students with strong chemistry backgrounds the continued opportunity to study fundamental concepts of chemistry in greater depth and breadth. Topics will include equilibria, acids and bases, electrochemistry, kinetics, and main group and transition metal chemistry. The lecture material will be applied in the lab to the study of inorganic elements, quantitative chemistry, and qualitative analysis. Prerequisite: CH105H or CH105 and permission of the instructor. Three hours of lecture-discussion and three hours of lab a week. S. Frey, M. Frey

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CH 109. CHEMISTRY OF FOODS AND FLAVORS (3 credit hours)
A study of the chemical makeup of food and nutrients, and their biochemical functions. Different food processing techniques and their effects on the chemical, physical, and biological properties of food will be discussed. The chemical basis of flavor, composition of some common flavor ingredients, and the role of flavor in nutrient assimilation will be explored. Prerequisite: QR1. V. Narasimhan

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CH 110. CHEMISTRY OF FOODS AND FLAVORS WITH LAB (4 credit hours)
A study of the chemical makeup of food and nutrients, and their biochemical functions. Different food processing techniques and their effects on the chemical, physical, and biological properties of food will be discussed. The chemical basis of flavor, composition of some common flavor ingredients, and the role of flavor in nutrient assimilation will be explored. Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Prerequisite: QR1. (Fulfills natural sciences requirement.) V. Narasimhan

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CH 111. ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY (3 credit hours)
A study of fundamental chemical principles as they relate to environmental issues such as air pollution, acid rain, global warming, destruction of the ozone layer, the production and consumption of energy, and water pollution. A basic understanding of chemical principles and practices is necessary to fully appreciate the scope and complexity of current global environmental issues. Specific examples of international environmental problems are presented as case studies to reinforce the course material. Chemical concepts such as atomic structure, bonding, themodynamics, nuclear chemistry, and chemical reactivity are introduced as they pertain to particular environmental issues. Prerequisite: QR1. (Fulfills QR2 requirement.) S. Frey

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CH 112. ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY WITH LAB (4 credit hours)
A study of fundamental chemical principles as they relate to environmental issues such as air pollution, acid rain, global warming, destruction of the ozone layer, the production and consumption of energy, and water pollution. A basic understanding of chemical principles and practices is necessary to fully appreciate the scope and complexity of current global environmental issues. Specific examples of international environmental problems are presented as case studies to reinforce the course material. Chemical concepts such as atomic structure, bonding, themodynamics, nuclear chemistry, and chemical reactivity are introduced as they pertain to particular environmental issues. Laboratory exercises that relate to the environmental issues presented in lectures serve to reinforce students' understanding of the underlying chemical principles. Prerequisite: QR1. (Fulfills QR2 and natural sciences requirements.) S. Frey

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CH 221. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I (5 credit hours)
The structures, physical properties, reactivity, and reaction mechanisms of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons are investigated. The lab introduces the student to synthesis, purification, and chemical and spectroscopic methods of characterizing organic compounds. Prerequisite: CH106. Three hours of lecture-discussion, and four hours of lab a week. R. Giguere, J. Ritorto

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CH 222. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II (5 credit hours)
The structure, physical properties, reactivity, and reaction mechanisms of important organic functional groups are investigated. The lab work focuses on structure determination and synthesis projects. Prerequisite: CH221. Three hours of lecture-discussion and four hours of lab a week. R. Giguere, J. Ritorto

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CH 299. PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIP IN CHEMISTRY (3 credit hours)
Internship opportunity for students whose curricular foundations and cocurricular experience have prepared them for professional work related to the major field. With faculty sponsorship and departmental approval, students may extend their educational experience into such areas as chemical research, environmental or material science, or chemical engineering. Prerequisite: complete CH106.

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CH 301. POLYMER CHEMISTRY (3 credit hours)
Introduction to all types of polymers with emphasis on organic polymers. Mechanisms of polymerization reactions, the characterization of products, and the technological application of polymers will be discussed. Additionally, the student will be introduced systematically to the historical and current literature in the field. Prerequisite: CH222. V. Narasimhan

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CH 303. MODERN ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY (5 credit hours)
This course describes modern analytical chemistry techniques for the separation, identification, and quantitation of chemical entities with an emphasis on instrumental methods. Sampling techniques and statistical treatment of data are also discussed. Prerequisites: CH221. Three hours of lecture-discussion and four hours of lab a week.

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CH 313. INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3 credit hours)
A study of the modern theories of atomic structure and chemical bonding as they pertain to inorganic systems. Topics include symmetry and group theory, bonding in ionic, covalent, and metallic substances, acid-base concepts, and coordination chemistry. Prerequisites: CH330 or 332 and permission of the instructor. S. Frey

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CH 314. INORGANIC CHEMISTRY WITH LAB (5 credit hours)
A study of the modern theories of atomic structure and chemical bonding as they pertain to inorganic systems. Topics include symmetry and group theory, bonding in ionic, covalent, and metallic substances, acid-base concepts, and coordination chemistry. Prerequisites: CH330 or 332 and permission of the instructor. S. Frey

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CH 315. ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3 credit hours)
Selected topics of current research in inorganic chemistry. Modern theories of atomic structure and chemical bonding are applied to examine these topics in depth. Extensive discussion of the experimental techniques and instrumentation used in current inorganic research is presented. Prerequisites: CH313 or 314. Three hours of lecture per week. S. Frey

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CH 324. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (5 credit hours)
Advanced synthetic methodology and mechanistic theory of organic chemistry will be studied. Prerequisite: CH222. Three hours of lecture and four hours of lab a week. R. Giguere

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CH 330. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I (3 credit hours)
The fundamental principles and concepts of equilibrium thermodynamics including entropy, energy, temperature, heat, work, and chemical potential. Applications include chemical reactions, phase changes, environmental science, and biochemical systems. Three hours of lecture-discussion per week. This nonlab course may be used to satisfy a requirement for the biochemistry major but may not be used to satisfy any requirements for the chemistry major. CH330 is the same as the lecture-discussion component of CH332. Prerequisites: CH106, MA113, PY208. J. Halstead

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CH 331. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II (3 credit hours)
The fundamental principles of kinetic theory, reaction kinetics, statistical thermodynamics, chemical application of quantum mechanics, bonding, molecular spectroscopy and structure. Three hours of lecture-discussion a week.Prerequisite: CH332 or permission of the department. J. Halstead

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CH 332. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I WITH LAB (5 credit hours)
The fundamental principles and concepts of equilibrium thermodynamics including entropy, energy, temperature, heat, work, and chemical potential. Applications include chemical reactions, phase changes, environmental science, and biochemical systems. Lab experiments provide opportunities for quantitative experimental investigation of thermodynamic systems, including studies of heat exchange, chemical equilibrium, and phase equilibrium. Three hours of lecture-discussion and four hours of lab a week. Prerequisites: CH222 or 303, MA113, PY208. J. Halstead

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CH 333. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II WITH LAB (5 credit hours)
The fundamental principles of kinetic theory, reaction kinetics, statistical thermodynamics, chemical application of quantum mechanics, bonding, molecular spectroscopy and structure. Lab and computer based experiments provide an opportunity for quantitative experimental investigation of phenomena such as reaction rates, transport properties, bonding, and spectroscopy. Three hours of lecture-discussion, four hours of lab a week.Prerequisite: CH332 or permission of the department. J. Halstead

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CH 341. BIOCHEMISTRY: MACROMOLECULAR STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION (5 credit hours)
A study of the organic, physical, and biological chemistry of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, and enzymes. The biosynthesis of nucleic acids and proteins is also discussed. The lab includes modern techniques for the purification and identification of biomolecules. Prerequisite: CH222. Three hours of lecture-discussion and four hours of lab a week. V. Narasimhan, M. Frey

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CH 342. BIOCHEMISTRY: INTERMEDIARY METABOLISM (3 credit hours)
Intermediary metabolism, bioenergetics, and the nature of enzyme-catalyzed reactions are discussed. Prerequisite: CH341. Three hours of lecture-discussion a week. V. Narasimhan, M. Frey

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CH 351, 352. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (3 credit hours)
Advanced topics in chemistry will be offered to either small groups of students or on an individual basis, allowing the student to study in depth areas of the science which are not covered in the regular course offerings. Prerequisite: CH222 and permission of the department.

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CH 353. TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY (3 credit hours)
An advanced study of selected global, national, and local topics in environmental chemistry. Possible topics include stratospheric ozone cycle, global climate changes, tropospheric smog, acid deposition, nutrient cycling, alkalinity, eutrophication, water treatment, and hazardous wastes. Prerequisite: CH221. Three hours of lecture-discussion per week.

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CH 371, 372. RESEARCH IN CHEMISTRY (3 credit hours)
An opportunity for qualified students to pursue research in any field of chemistry under the supervision of a member of the department. Prerequisite: Permission of the department.

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CH 375. LITERATURE INVESTIGATION IN CHEMISTRY (3 credit hours)
Students prepare an in-depth written report on a current topic in chemistry or biochemistry. The chemical literature is investigated by both traditional methods and modern computer-based techniques. Individual and group conferences throughout the semester, as well as oral presentations are required. Prerequisite: Permission of the department.

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CH 377, 378. SENIOR SEMINAR IN CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY (1 credit hour)
Seminar courses designed to teach communication skills relating to scientific research. The courses include presentations by guest speakers, faculty and students, as well as discussions of the current chemical literature. These courses are offered on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis only and are required of all senior chemistry majors. Each of these courses may be repeated once for credit.

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CH 399. PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIP IN CHEMISTRY (3 or 6 credit hours)
Professional experience at an advanced level for juniors and seniors with substantial academic and cocurricular experience in the major field. With faculty sponsorship and department approval, students may extend their educational experience into such areas as chemical research, environmental or material science, or chemical engineering. Only three semester hours may count toward the major. Prerequisites: CH303 and one additional 300-level course in chemistry.

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