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Skidmore College
Academics at Skidmore

Skidmore Lectures

 

Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx Studies Fall 2022 Speaker Series On Latinidad: Identity and Culture

Paul Joseph López Oro: Decolonizing AfroLatinidad: Black Central Americans in the United States

Monday, Sept. 26

5 p.m.

Virtual Event

López Oro’s research interests include Black politics in Latin America, the Caribbean and U.S. AfroLatinidades, Black Latinx LGBTQ movements and performances, and Black transnationalism. He is currently working on a transdisciplinary study analyzing oral histories, performances, social media, film, literary texts and visual cultures to unearth the political, intellectual, cultural and spiritual genealogies of Garifuna women and subaltern geographies of Garifuna LGBTQ+ folks at the forefront of Garifuna transnational movements in New York City. He is assistant professor of Africana studies at Smith College. Contact Oscar A. Pérez for more information.

Paul Joseph Lopez Oro

American Studies Annual Lecture

Tuesday, Sept. 27

5:30 p.m.

Emerson Auditorium, Palamountain Hall

Raúl Pérez, assistant professor of sociology at the University of La Verne and author of “The Souls of White Jokes: How Racist Humor Fuels White Supremacy” (Stanford University Press), notes that laughter is often seen as a way to ease tension in an overly politicized social world. But he asks, "Do the stakes change when the jokes are racist?" In this lecture, Pérez will confront this unsettling question, recognizing that finding answers to it is crucial to understanding the persistence of racism and white supremacy in American society. Pérez will illustrate how racist humor plays a central role in reinforcing and mobilizing racist ideology, solidarity, and inequality. Contact Sue Matrazzo or Greg Pfitzer for more information.

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Eurydice, Orpheus & Opera

Wednesday, Sept. 28

6:30 p.m.

Filene Auditorium

Sarah Day-O’Connell and Sylvia Stoner-Hawkins (Music) discuss the legacy of Orpheus and Eurydice in opera as part of “Eurydice Turning,” a collaborative, semester-long series of events considering the long reception of the Orpheus and Eurydice myth in a variety of media and supporting this fall’s JKB Mainstage production of “Eurydice,” written by Sarah Ruhl and directed by Marie Glotzbach. The series is supported by the Classics, Dance, and Theater departments and the Tang Teaching Museum. Contact Dan Curley for more information

Eurydice Rising

Greenberg Middle East Scholar-in-Residence

The Social Origins of Authoritarian Regimes: A History of State-Middle Class Relations in Egypt

Wednesday, Sept. 28

7:30 p.m.

Davis Auditorium, Palamountain Hall

How do we explain the longevity of authoritarianism in the Middle East? Pundits, journalists, and academics have offered various answers to this question. Based on his forthcoming book, The Egyptian Social Contract: A History of State–Middle Class Relations, Relli Shechter, Greenberg Middle East Scholar-in-Residence at Skidmore and chair of the Department of Middle East Studies at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel, explores the formal and informal agreements between the Egyptian state and its citizens that constitute the Egyptian social contract in the aftermath of Second World War. Authoritarianism across the broader region is considered. This lecture is sponsored by the Office of Special Programs and the History Department. Contact Chris Merrill for more information.

Shechter

After Dobbs: The Future of the Supreme Court

Friday, Sept. 30

5 p.m.

Gannett Auditorium, Palamountain Hall

Akhil Reed Amar, Sterling Professor of Law and Political Science at Yale University, and Saikrishna Prakash, James Monroe Distinguished Professor of Law and Albert Clark Tate Jr. Professor of Law at the University of Virginia, discuss the Dobbs ruling, other important cases from the Supreme Court’s last term, and what to expect from the court’s jurisprudence in the future. This event is sponsored by the Department of Political Science and the Periclean Honors Forum.

Akhil Reed AmarSaikrishna Prakash

Latin American, Caribbean, and Latinx Studies Fall 2022 Speaker Series On Latinidad: Identity and Culture

Jonathan Rosa: Latinx Languages & Identities Beyond Borders

Monday, Oct. 3

5 p.m.

Virtual event

Jonathan Rosa’s research examines the co-naturalization of language and race as a key feature of modern governance. Specifically, he tracks colonially structured interrelations among racial marginalization, linguistic stigmatization, and institutional inequity. He is the author of “Looking like a Language, Sounding like a Race: Raciolinguistic Ideologies and the Learning of Latinidad” (2019, Oxford University Press) and co-editor of the volume “Language and Social Justice in Practice” (2019, Routledge). He is associate professor in the Graduate School of Education and the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity at Stanford University. Contact Oscar A. Pérez for more information.

Jonathan Rosa

Annual Steloff Lecture: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Monday, Oct. 3

8 p.m.

Gannett Auditorium, Palamountain Hall 

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie was born in Nigeria to an Igbo family and moved to the United States to complete her graduate education at Yale University and at the Johns Hopkins University. Her award-winning novels include “Americanah” (2013 National Book Critics Circle Award), “Half a Yellow Sun” (2007 Orange Prize) and “Purple Hibiscus” (2003 Commonwealth Writers Prize). She is the recipient of many other awards, including a 2008 MacArthur Genius Grant. Her nonfiction works include “We should all be feminists” (2014) and a June 2021 essay, “It Is Obscene,” a critique of “cancel culture.” Contact Bob Boyers for more information.

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Screening Eurydice & Orpheus (Part 1)

Wednesday, Oct. 5

6:30 p.m.

Filene Auditorium

Dan Curley (Classics) discusses the legacy of Orpheus and Eurydice in "classic" 20th-century cinema as part of “Eurydice Turning,” a collaborative, semester-long series of events considering the long reception of the Orpheus and Eurydice myth in a variety of media and supporting this fall’s JKB Mainstage production of “Eurydice,” written by Sarah Ruhl and directed by Marie Glotzbach. The series is supported by the Classics, Dance, and Theater departments and the Tang Teaching Museum. Contact Dan Curley for more information

Eurydice Rising

Edwin M. Moseley Faculty Lecture

Daniel Nathan: Remembrance of Games Past: Sport, History, and Culture

Thursday, Oct. 6

5 p.m.

Gannett Auditorium, Palamountain Hall

The 2022 Moseley Faculty Lecture is presented by Professor of American Studies Daniel Nathan. The lecture will use the American sporting past (with an emphasis on baseball and the life and career of Hall of Famer Buck O’Neil) to consider how sport, race, and collective memory reflect and inform cultural values. The Moseley Lecture highlights compelling, original research and creative work, and is the highest honor Skidmore faculty confer upon one of their peers. 

Dan Nathan

Dunkerley Dialogue with Sumita Chakraborty and Maggie Greaves

Thursday, Oct. 6

6:30 p.m.

Tang Teaching Museum

Join us for this Dunkerley Dialogue with poet Sumita Chakraborty and Skidmore Associate Professor of English Maggie Greaves. Greaves, a co-curator for “Parallax: Framing the Cosmos,” will be in discussion with Chakraborty about the poet’s creative and scholarly work on the intersections of outer space, ecology, race, and gender. Contact Oliva Cammisa-Frost for more information.

Sumita Chakraborty

Aaron Dworkin: Throwing the Dice: Creativity, Arts Entrepreneurship, and Inclusion

Wednesday, Oct. 12

5 p.m.

Ladd Concert Hall, Arthur Zankel Music Center

This event is open to the public

Aaron Dworkin (MacArthur Fellow, Obama appointee and Professor of Entrepreneurship and Leadership at the University of Michigan) shares his personal story of social entrepreneurship focusing on the vital role that the arts and creativity play in a post-pandemic society. Dworkin will share strategies on innovative leadership, creative careers, and the essential value of the arts in our communities. Presented by the Arts Administration Program and Entrepreneurial Artist Initiative in partnership with the Management & Business Department and Wyckoff Center. Contact David Howson for more information.

Aaron Dworkin

Screening Eurydice & Orpheus (Part 2)

Wednesday, Oct. 12

6:30 p.m.

Filene Auditorium

Dan Curley (Classics) discusses Orpheus and Eurydice in underground cinema as part of “Eurydice Turning,” a collaborative, semester-long series of events considering the long reception of the Orpheus and Eurydice myth in a variety of media and supporting this fall’s JKB Mainstage production of “Eurydice,” written by Sarah Ruhl and directed by Marie Glotzbach. The series is supported by the Classics, Dance, and Theater departments and the Tang Teaching Museum. Contact Dan Curley for more information

Eurydice Rising

Eurydice Turning

Wednesday, Oct. 19

6 p.m.

Payne Room, Tang Museum

Students from Theater and Classics celebrate the upcoming opening of “Eurydice” by Sarah Ruhl with readings of select scenes, movement expressions, and an exhibition curated from the Tang's collections. “Eurydice Turning” is a collaborative, semester-long series of events considering the long reception of the Orpheus and Eurydice myth in a variety of media and supporting this fall’s JKB Mainstage production, directed by Marie Glotzbach. The series is supported by the Classics, Dance, and Theater departments and the Tang Teaching Museum. Contact Dan Curley for more information

Eurydice Rising

Curating Eurydice

Wednesday, Oct. 26

6:30 p.m.

Payne Room, Tang Teaching Museum

Students from the MythConceptions Scribner Seminar offer a guided tour of their exhibition as part of “Eurydice Turning,” a collaborative, semester-long series of events considering the long reception of the Orpheus and Eurydice myth in a variety of media and supporting this fall’s JKB Mainstage production of “Eurydice,” written by Sarah Ruhl and directed by Marie Glotzbach. The series is supported by the Classics, Dance, and Theater departments and the Tang Teaching Museum. Contact Dan Curley for more information

Eurydice Rising

Looking Back in Style: Orpheus & Eurydice in Haute Couture & Beyond

Tuesday, Dec. 6

6:30 p.m.

Emerson Auditorium

Stacie Raucci (Classics, Union College) discusses the legacy of Orpheus and Eurydice in the high fashion and cosmetics industries as part of “Eurydice Turning,” a collaborative, semester-long series of events considering the long reception of the Orpheus and Eurydice myth in a variety of media and supporting this fall’s JKB Mainstage production of “Eurydice,” written by Sarah Ruhl and directed by Marie Glotzbach. The series is supported by the Classics, Dance, and Theater departments and the Tang Teaching Museum. Contact Dan Curley for more information

Eurydice Rising