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Skidmore College
2021 Summer Sessions

Course List

AR136 Digital Foundations (FULL)
AR243 Digital Media: Animation
AR264F Water Based Media
AR264F Water Based Media: Acrylic
AR264G Photography: Summer Landscapes
AR264H Printmaking: Monotype & Relief
AR351F Water Based Media
AR351F Water Based Media: Acrylic
MP190 Class Study of Voice
MP195 Class Study of Jazz Piano
MP281 Private Music Instruction - Voice
MP381Private Music Instruction - Voice
TH140 Intro to Directing
TH304 Special Studies in Acting
TH305F Design and Technical Theater

BI152 Topics in Biology: Pestilence - The Fourth Horseman
BI170 Human Genetics
CH115 Fundamentals of Chemistry
CH125 Principles of Chemistry
CS106 Introduction to Computer Science I
GE101 Earth System Science
GE112 Introduction to Oceanography w/Lab
GE207 Environmental Geology
NS101 Introduction to Neuroscience
PS101 Introduction to Psychological Science
PS202 Statistics and Research Methods I
PS214 Psychological Disorders
PS218 Cognition
PY109 Sound & Music w/lab
PY207 General Physics I w/lab

AN101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
AN102 Anthropology of the Human Past
AN252D Anthropology of Japan
AN351D Language and Culture
EC104 Introduction to Microeconomics
GW101 Introduction to Gender Studies
HF215 Peer Health Education
MB214 Foundations of Marketing
MB224 Foundations of Organizational Behavior
MB333 Business Law I
SO101 Sociological Perspectives
SW212 Social Work Values and Populations at Risk
SW224 Working with LGBTQ+ Populations
SW324 Advance Special Studies in Social Work

CC220 Classical Mythology
EN103 Writing Seminar 1
EN105 Writing Seminar II: Food Fights
EN105 Writing Seminar II: Under the Influence
EN225W Introduction to Shakespeare
EN228 Poetry and Magic
HI 116H Sea Changes: A History of the World's Oceans
HI230W Latin America: History through Travel
HI247P History of Modern Japan
HI316R Empires of India
MF101 Introduction to Media Studies
MF151D Screenwriting
PH207 Introduction to Logic
WLI101 Elementary Italian
WLS101 Elementary Spanish
WLS212 Spanish American Lit and Culture

Course Descriptions

Course # • Course Title • Credits • Instructor • Lab Fee (if any)

AN 102 • Anthropology of the Human Past • 3 • Kathryn Baustian
An introduction to the biological and cultural evolution of humans. In learning about the origins of human diversity, students come to understand concepts of time, space, and context as critical factors in our ability to reconstruct the human past. Students engage in a variety of scientific evaluation sessions involving data common to archaeological analysis of human evolutionary and cultural change to learn how this reconstruction occurs. 
Note(s): (Fulfills social sciences requirement.)

AN 252D • Anthropology of Japan • 4 • Caitlin Meagher
An exploration of 21st century life in Japan through social theory and ethnographic case studies. Students examine popular Western misconceptions of Japanese society based in notions of the “exotic” and explore contemporary issues including shifting gender roles, changes to the structure of the home and family, working life, and the education system from an anthropological perspective. Students will consider Japanese culture and society on its own cultural terms and in a global context through lectures, guided activities, and independent research projects. Includes synchronous online meetings.

AN 351D • Language and Culture • 4 • Michael C. Ennis-McMillan
An examination of human language as a cultural phenomenon. Students learn basic concepts and techniques from anthropological linguistics to study the interrelationship of human thought, expression, and culture.  Using examples from diverse world regions, students use linguistic principles to compare patterns of communication in Western and non-Western settings. Topics include the structure of language, linguistic diversity, multilingualism and codeswitching, cultures of performance, and globalization of media.  We also analyze how the interdependence of language and power relates to race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality.  Students consider how to apply anthropological linguistics to promote language learning, including English language learning. Prior social science coursework is recommended. 
Prerequisite: AN-101 or permission of instructor.

AR 243 • Digital Media: Animation • 4 • Paris Baillie
In this course students will learn to integrate traditional and modern techniques to expand and evolve their animation practice. We will also explore new and creative ways to approach making animations from home using your phone and found objects. Students will create a range of projects that explore motion through frame-by-frame illustration, GIFs, live-action video, and digital animations. There will be weekly in-class discussions, readings, screenings, and critiques. No digital experience is required.

AR 264F • Water Based Media Jenny Kemp • 4 • Fee $30
An exploration of water-based drawing and painting media.  Using direct observation, experimentation, and invention, this course builds understanding of formal principles, color interaction and the physical qualities of materials.  Assignments support development of a personal vision.  Prerequisites: AR 133.

AR 264G • Photography: Summer Landscapes • 4 • Emily Vallee Fee $80
This course is designed to explore the genre of landscape photography. Students will photograph the local landscape with DSLR cameras, experimenting with a variety of digital image making techniques. Through interaction with the land students will develop an environmental awareness. Emphasis will be placed on the creation of a cohesive body of work, in class critique, discussion of imagery and literature pertaining to contemporary landscape and developing a personal relationship to the land. Students should be familiar with the basics of digital photography as well as provide their own DSLR camera for course. Introductory Photoshop and Printing skills will be incorporated into class workflow. Students should have a basic understanding of DSLR cameras and must provide their own.

AR 264H • Printmaking: Monotype and Relief • 4 • Sophie Isaak
An introduction to printmaking focusing on relief, monoprint and monotype techniques. The creative process in printmaking involves collaboration while also emphasizing personal growth and creative flexibility, developing skills in experimentation and critical problem solving. Students will study both the history of printmaking as well as examples of contemporary artists working in print. In addition to experiential learning, students will engage in individual research, writing, critiques, and discussions. This is an online only course. You will need access to a laptop and internet access to be able to participate in this course. There is no textbook for this course; however, you will be expected to purchase printmaking supplies. Pre-requisite: AR 133, or permission of instructor. Recommended: AR 223, 224
Materials list for art supplies to be purchased by students will be provided, approximate cost $150

AR 351F • Water Based Media • 4 • Jenny Kemp • Fee $30
An exploration of water-based drawing and painting media.  Using direct observation, experimentation, and invention, this course builds understanding of formal principles, color interaction and the physical qualities of materials.  Assignments support development of a personal vision.  Prerequisites: AR 133.

BI 152 • Topics in Biology:  Pestilence - The Fourth Horseman • 4 • Patricia Hilleren • Lab Fee $80
The course title is a play on The Four Horseman of the Apocalypse from the Book of Revelation, the last book of the New Testament of the Bible (6:1-8).  In this vision, the manifestation of the four horsemen (Pestilence or Disease, Famine, War and Death) purportedly anticipates Judgment Day- the end of the world.  In this course we will explore the topic of pestilence, with a focus on infectious disease and the roles that a variety of microbes (bacteria, protozoa and viruses) play in this process. To fully appreciate infectious disease, we must examine the interactions of microbes with the human host.  To that end, this course is also an introduction to some of the fundamental structures (e.g. tissues, cells, genomes, and proteins) that comprise the human organism.  As the course progresses, we will explore how representatives of three categories of microbes (bacteria, protozoa and viruses) disrupt the physiology of a ‘healthy’ cell/organism- leading to a state of disease.  We will also learn how medical interventions aim to mitigate these diseases. The laboratory portion of the course will focus on learning how scientists study bacteria- one of the predominant classes of microbes that cause infectious disease. The lab experience offers you the opportunity to i) learn and develop skills in scientific thinking and process; ii) practice a variety of technical skills including sterile technique, bacterial cell culture, light microscopy, bacterial transformation, and viral plaque assays and iii) gain skills in the interpretation and communication of scientific ideas and results.

CH 115 • Fundamentals of Chemistry w/lab • 4 • Beatrice Kendall
An Introductory course for students with little to no background in chemistry. Fundamental chemical concepts such as atomic structure, bonding, chemical reactions, and the properties of solids, liquids, and gases are presented.  Emphasis is placed on learning the “language of chemistry,” achieving the ability to visualize and understand natural processes on an atomic and molecular level, and developing quantitative reasoning and problem-solving skills. Laboratory exercises and experiments serve to illustrate concepts presented in the lecture, and reinforce the mathematical skills necessary to investigate chemical systems. This course is appropriate for students preparing to take CH 125 or 126-Principles of Chemistry and for students who seek a one-semester survey of the subject.
Prerequisites: (QR1 or MA 100 or placement at the FQR level or placement at the AQR level) and placement based on the online Chemistry diagnostic exam.
Note(s): May not be used to satisfy major or minor requirements in chemistry or biology. (Fulfills FQR, QR2 and natural sciences requirements.)

EN 225W • Introduction to Shakespeare • 4 • Joseph Cermatori
This course offers an introductory look at Shakespeare’s comedies, histories, tragedies, and romances, aiming for an overall survey. We will raise questions about some of the following topics: Shakespeare’s language and dramaturgy; the ways his writing developed over his lifetime; how the plays have been staged and performed historically; what ideological work the plays performed in their early modern context, particularly concerning race, gender, political theory, and political economy; and why they continue to resonate today. Students will watch performances and will occasionally recite or stage moments from the texts in class. This course counts toward the “Language and Literature in Context” and “Early Period” requirements for students in the English major. For all students, it fulfills the “Humanities” requirement.

GE 101 • Earth System Science • 4 • Kyle Nichols • Lab Fee: $50
An introduction to Earth’s dynamic systems and geologic processes. The planet is studied from its deep interior to its oceanic, surficial, and atmospheric components to develop a scientific understanding of Earth as a holistic environmental system, of which the biosphere, including humanity, is one component. Within this context, course topics such as rocks and minerals, mountain building, earthquakes, volcanoes, glaciers, surface and groundwater, and resources are examined from the perspective of the interactions between geologic processes and humans.
Prerequisite: QR1. Note(s): (Fulfills QR2 requirement; FQR requirement; qualifies as a natural science laboratory course for breadth requirement.) 

GE 112 • Introduction to Oceanography w/ Lab • 4 • Amy Frappier • Lab Fee $50
Introduction to the interaction of physical, chemical, geological, and biological processes operative in the great water bodies that cover nearly three-quarters of the earth’s surface. Students will study basic principles of physical and chemical oceanography, marine biology, and marine geology while also developing quantitative reasoning skills.  Five hours of lecture, guided activities, laboratory experiments, field trips, and problem-solving per week.
Prerequisites: QR1 or MA 100 or placement at the FQR level or placement at the AQR level.
Note(s): Three hours of lecture, two hours of lab per week.
(Fulfills natural sciences requirement; fulfills QR2 requirement; fulfills FQR requirement; fulfills scientific inquiry.)

GW 101 • Introduction to Gender Studies • 4 • Donnie Bellamy
An introduction to the origins, purpose, subject matters, and methods of the interdisciplinary study of gender. Students are expected to expand their knowledge of the relative historical and present social conditions of people of different genders in different contexts and to develop analytical skills for the examination of socially significant variables-race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality. Students will explore different and often opposing understandings of what constitutes feminism and feminist action. The class format will combine interactive lectures, reading assignments, discussion, formal research and writing assignments, and other student projects. Ideally, students will leave the class with an understanding of how gender structures cultural, political, economic, and social relations in various contexts.

HI 230W • Latin America: History through Travel • 4 • Jordana Dym
An examination of the ideas and impact of European and North American travel narratives on historical knowledge of Latin America and the Caribbean from the sixteenth through the early twentieth centuries. Students examine accounts by conquerors, diplomats, pirates, scientists, missionaries, and tourists to consider what questions and analytical methods allow for interpretation of the factual or fictional elements in these important sources for the creation of historical knowledge about travelers, their values, the lands they visited, and the people, environments and cultures they described.
Note(s): (Fulfills social sciences requirement; fulfills humanistic inquiry and global cultural perspective; when offered as HI 230W, fulfills expository writing requirement.)

HI 316R • Empires in India • 4 • Tillman Nechtman
Examines the history of the Indian subcontinent from the late sixteenth century to the present. Begins with a study of the late Mugal period, moving on to explore the origins of the British empire in India, focusing in particular the role of the East India Company in that process and on the impacts British imperialism had on British, Indian, and world history. The second half of the course focuses on efforts to pull down the structures of British imperialism in India from the nineteenth century forward to independence in 1947, including such topics as the origins of Indian nationalism, the complex interaction of various groups involved in decolonization in India, and the early histories of the independent nations that emerged from British India.
Note(s): Courses at the 300 level are open to sophomores only with permission of instructor. (Designated a Cultural Diversity course; fulfills humanistic inquiry and global cultural perspective.)

MB 214 • Foundations of Marketing • 3 • Azita Hirsa
A comprehensive assessment of marketing’s dynamic role in contemporary global society. The course emphasizes the development of marketing strategies which reflect domestic and cross-national competitive structures and diverse marketplace realities. Topics include consumer analyses, target market identification, positioning, e-commerce, ethics, sustainability, and coordination of marketing mix-elements.  This course covers the following dimensions for studying management and business in context: I, III, V.
Prerequisite: MB 107. 

MB 224 • Foundations of Organizational Behavior • 3 • Azita Hirsa
The study of human behavior in the organizational context. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of topics in the area of organizational behavior through three levels of analysis (individual, group, and organizational). Topics covered may include: organizational theory; managing diversity; personality, values, and work attitudes; perception; decision making; motivation and goal setting; teamwork; conflict and negotiation; leadership, power, and influence tactics; organizational structure; organizational change; and organizational culture. This course incorporates the following dimensions for studying management and business in context: I, II, III, IV, V, VI. Coverage of the dimensions may vary per instructor.
Prerequisite: MB 107.

MB 333 • Business Law I • 3 • Scott Mulligan
A study of the origin of laws, philosophy of law and related ethical issues, and the court system and its legal procedures with emphasis on their impact in business and economic situations. Specific topics, which will be studied using a modified Socratic method and examination and briefing of case law, include contracts, agency, LLCs, corporations and partnerships. This course covers the following dimensions for studying management and business in context: I, VI.

MF 101 • Introduction to Media Studies • 4 • Paul Benzon
We live in a culture saturated by media. From the television shows and films that stream to us on our laptops and tablets to the images and updates we consume on our phones, media texts and technologies are so omnipresent within contemporary life that they seem almost invisible. Yet this seeming invisibility makes it all the more important that we look closely at the workings of media technology, and that we ask critical questions of the media that surround us. What roles do different media forms play in producing artistic and social meanings? What powers do media hold over us, and what powers might they give us as consumers and producers? How have media changed from the beginning of the modern period to our contemporary moment of digital convergence?

In this course, we will ask these and other questions as we explore the broad and eclectic terrain of media and film studies. We will hone our skills in the critical analysis of a range of media forms, including film, television, radio and sound, and the internet and new media. Studying key texts in these forms alongside a selection of critical writings, we will consider how media technologies create aesthetic effects and how they play crucial roles in shaping social questions of identity, power, community, and artistry. Our ultimate goal will be to become more critically aware as students, consumers, producers, artists, and citizens within contemporary media culture.

MF 151D • Screenwriting • 4 • Nicole Coady
Students will write their own feature length screenplays.  They will learn the classic Hollywood three-act structure for creating a script.  They will also be instructed on how to craft a compelling logline, as well as create a skeleton treatment from which to build their story.  They will develop a final film treatment, which can be shared with other participants in the often collaborative work of making movies. 

The craft of storytelling for the screen will be honed through examining landmark films.  We will put what we learn into practice through writing our own feature length screenplay. 

MP 190 • Class Study of Voice • 2 • Sylvia Stoner-Hawkins
For students with little or no formal training in singing, this course focuses on the development of the singing voice. Study and application of the principles and techniques of singing: breathing, tone production, resonance and diction, among other technical skills. Repertory chosen will illustrate different styles. Part of each class will include study of fundamental musicianship skills.
Note(s): (Fulfills arts requirement; fulfills artistic inquiry.)

MP 195• Class Study Of Jazz Piano • 2 • John Nazarenko
Study of jazz piano voicings, scales, and modes for improvisation. Left-hand chording patterns, harmonic structures, and accompanying scales will be emphasized. Other areas of study will include diatonic and chromatic voice leading, phrasing and solo development, functional harmony, bass lines, and solo jazz piano technique. Class will read selected jazz charts and listen to and analyze contemporary and historical jazz pianists.
Note(s): Not for liberal arts credit. (Fulfills arts requirement.)

MP 281 • Private Music Instruction – Voice • 2 • Sylvia Stoner-Hawkins
Individual 45-minute weekly instruction. Prospective students accepted by interview.
Note(s): (Fulfills arts requirement; fulfills artistic inquiry.)

MP 381 • Private Music Instruction – Voice • 2 • Sylvia Stoner-Hawkins
Individual 45-minute weekly instruction in voice. Prospective students accepted by interview.
Prerequisite: four prior semesters of MP 281.
Note(s): (Fulfills arts requirement.)

NS 101 • Introduction to Neuroscience • 4 • Sarita Lagalwar • Lab Fee $40
An interdisciplinary examination of the neurobiological bases of behavior and mental processing. Topics include the structure and functioning of the nervous system, brain-behavior relationships, and hormonal and genetic effects on behavior and mental processing. Laboratories develop students' understanding of functional neuroanatomy, neural transmission, and human neurophysiology.
(Fulfills natural sciences breadth requirement.)

PH 207 • Introduction to Logic • 4 • Peter Murray
An introduction to the basic concepts and methods of modern symbolic logic, with a focus on their application to proper reasoning. Students learn how to represent sentences in logical notation, to reconstruct arguments in that notation, to assess arguments for validity and soundness, and to prove conclusions from premises using a system of natural deduction. Students also learn to recognize common argument forms and common mistakes in reasoning (fallacies), to graphically represent text-based arguments using collaborative online software, are introduced to philosophical issues related to logic, and learn how symbolic logic is the basis for the digital computer.
(Fulfills QR2 requirement.)

PS 202 • Statistics and Research Methods I • 4 • Stephanie Crocco
An introduction to the research methodologies and statistical analyses used in psychological science. Emphasis will be on experimentation in psychology (designing and conducting experiments, analyzing data, and reporting results through scientific writing).
Prerequisites: PS 101 or NS 101 and placement at the AQR level or completion of an FQR course or QR1.
Note(s): Three hours of lecture and two hours of lab per week. Writing intensive course for the major. (Fulfills AQR).

PS 214 • Psychological Disorders • 4 • Rachel Mann-Rosan
An introduction to the history and study of psychological disorders (e.g., substance use disorders, psychotic disorders, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, personality disorders) with an emphasis on understanding the development of disorders, diagnostic issues, and symptoms.
Prerequisites: PS 101

PY 207 • General Physics I w/ Lab • 4 • Jeremy Wachter
A calculus-based introduction to the concepts and principles of mechanics, emphasizing translational and rotational kinematics and dynamics, work and energy, conservation laws, and gravitation. Hands-on exploration of physical systems using computer interfaced laboratory equipment and spreadsheet modeling techniques are used to elucidate physical principles.
Prerequisites: QR 1 or placement at the AQR level or completion of an FQR course. Corequisite: MA 111.
Note(s): Five hours of lecture, guided activities, laboratory experiments, and problem-solving per week. (Fulfills AQR, QR2, and natural sciences requirements; fulfills scientific inquiry.)

SW 212 • Social Work Values and Populations At Risk • 3 • Peter McCarthy
This course introduces social work values; it provides students an opportunity to identify and clarify conflicting values and ethical dilemmas; and, it examines the impact of discrimination, economic deprivation, and oppression on groups distinguished by race, ethnicity, culture, class, gender, sexual orientation, religion, physical or mental ability, age, and national origin. Students learn assessment and intervention skills that enable social workers to serve diverse populations and to promote social and economic justice.
(Fulfills social sciences requirement; designated a Cultural Diversity course.)  

SW 224 • Working with LGBTQ+ Populations • 3 • June Paul
This course provides foundation knowledge and general practice skills for working with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) individuals in the United States. A life cycle focus will be presented to highlight LGBTQ historical and political perspectives, the development of LGBTQ identity-formation, health, mental health and familial issues, and LGBTQ issues across the life span. Intersectionality of race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, and national origin will be addressed along with ethical and legal issues which impact LGBTQ individuals and their families. Students will learn how to practice with LGBTQ clients in culturally relevant ways and resources for support and information will be identified. A foundation for the course will be laid by raising students’ awareness of personal, interpersonal, and institutional values and beliefs and how biases may manifest as prejudice, discrimination, and oppression. The National Association of Social Workers’ (NASW) Code of Ethics will guide discussions around viewing sexual orientation and gender identity through a professional lens. 

SW 324D • Advanced Special Studies in Social Work • 4 • Peter McCarthy

TH 140 • Introduction to Directing • 3 • John Michael DiResta
An overview of the essential elements of stage directing. Students will analyze play texts and directing theories as well as engage in active lab work in understanding dramatic action, composition, and picturization in a variety of spaces, which will provide the foundation for working with actors. Students will also analyze plays, study the expression of directorial concepts, and communicate with actors through class exercises and scene work reinforcing the idea of the director as a collaborator as well as the primary leader and communicator about the play before and during the rehearsal process. Students will develop time-management strategies, enabling them to craft a rehearsal schedule by which to build the play and move the rehearsal process forward. Theoretical texts and articles about directors and play texts will provide one context for these analyses. In the studio, students will work as actors and directors.
Prerequisite: TH 103 

WLS 101 • Elementary Spanish 1 • 4 • Diana M Barnes
An introduction to spoken and written Spanish emphasizing cultural perspectives. Linguistic emphasis is on basic grammar, vocabulary, and the development of reading, conversation, and writing skills while learning about the cultures of Spain and Spanish America.
Prerequisite: Instructor approval.

WLS 212 Spanish American Lit & Culture • 4 • Beatriz Loyola
An overview of Spanish-American literature and other cultural expressions from pre-independence to the present.  The course introduces main literary genres, movements, and authors as well as the study of cultural practices in the region through music, visual art, journalism, and other forms of media.  The course’s main objectives are to increase students’ ability to read critically, appreciate and analyze literary and visual Spanish American texts, and understand the cultural diversity of the region.
Prerequisites: WLS 208 or permission of instructor.

Course # • Course Title • Credits • Instructor • Lab Fee (if any)

AN 101 • Introduction to Cultural Anthropology • 3 • Caitlin Meagher
Anthropology is a lot more than the scientific study of humans. By asking ourselves, “what is anthropology?” and “what is culture?” we must understand what cultural anthropologists actually do in practice. A cultural anthropologist is someone who observes, records, and thinks about the operation, function, and design of human life in all of its complexities. Humanity, like culture, is messy, nonlinear, multifaceted, and constantly shifting. Think about the culture in which your parents grew up: lots of things may have changed since then, including popular music, technology, medical advancements, and so on. The purpose of this course is to provide you with an introduction to the historical context, current manifestations, and theoretical processes of cultural anthropology as an academic discipline and as a way of viewing the world. We will accomplish this by exploring the similarities and diversity of human societies through ethnographic case studies and cross-cultural comparisons in both film and text. These topics are illustrated through examining the history and utility of anthropology's hallmark method, ethnography, which is the immersion of the researcher in the culture under study.

AR 136 • Digital Foundations • 4 • Lindsay Buchman
A survey of aesthetic and technological best practices in visual communication today. Students will study the basic functions and integral properties of Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, as well as, After Effects or other video software while learning the principles of design. Vector and raster imaging techniques, scanning, printing, and front and file management are introduced through a series of demonstrations/projects that build upon each other. Through projects and critiques, students will work to make a visual voice that is distinctive and original. No digital experience necessary.
Note: (Fulfills arts requirement; fulfills artistic inquiry.)

AR 264F • Water Based Media: Acrylic • 4 • Jenny Kemp
An exploration of water-based drawing and painting media with a focus on acrylic paint.  Using direct observation, experimentation, and invention, this course builds understanding of formal principles, color interaction and the physical qualities of materials.  Assignments support development of a personal vision.  Prerequisites: AR 133.  
Students will be expected to buy art supplies from a list supplied by the instructor.

AR 264H • Printmaking: Monotype and Relief • 4 • Sophie Isaak
An introduction to printmaking focusing on relief, monoprint and monotype techniques. The creative process in printmaking involves collaboration while also emphasizing personal growth and creative flexibility, developing skills in experimentation and critical problem solving. Students will study both the history of printmaking as well as examples of contemporary artists working in print. In addition to experiential learning, students will engage in individual research, writing, critiques, and discussions. This is an online only course. You will need access to a laptop and internet access to be able to participate in this course. There is no textbook for this course; however, you will be expected to purchase printmaking supplies. Pre-requisite: AR 133, or permission of instructor. Recommended: AR 223, 224
Materials list for art supplies to be purchased by students will be provided, approximate cost $150.

AR 351F • Water Based Media: Acrylic • 4 • Jenny Kemp
An exploration of water-based drawing and painting media with a focus on acrylic paint.  Using direct observation, experimentation, and invention, this course builds understanding of formal principles, color interaction and the physical qualities of materials.  Assignments support development of a personal vision.  
Prerequisites: AR 133.  
Students will be required to purchase art supplies for this course, a materials list will be supplied.

BI 170 • Human Genetics• 4 • Bernard Possidente 
An introduction to the principles of genetics and their application to human biology. Topics include the history of genetics; the structure, function, and inheritance of genes; medical genetics; and genetic engineering.
Note(s): Academic Year: Three hours of lecture, two hours of lab per week.
Summer: Nine hours of lecture, six hours of lab per week. (Fulfills natural sciences and QR2 requirements.)

CC 220 • Classical Mythology • 3 • Amy Oh
A study of the important myths in Greek and Roman culture, with attention to their religious, psychological, and historical origins. Comparative mythology, structural analysis, modern psychological interpretations and the development of classical myths in Western literature and art receive attention.
Note(s): (Fulfills humanities requirement; fulfills humanistic inquiry.)

CS 106 • Introduction to Computer Science I • 4 • Michael Eckmann
An introduction to the principles of design, implementation, and testing of object-oriented programs. The course covers language features such as control structures, classes, file I/0, and basic data structures including arrays. Other topics include recursion and fundamental algorithms, such as elementary searching and sorting algorithms.  May not be taken for credit by students who have taken or are currently taking CS 107 or CS 206.
Note(s): (Fulfills QR2 requirement.)

EC 104 • Introduction to Microeconomics • 4 • Rodrigo Araujo Schneider
An introduction to the study of markets. Students will develop the basic economic model of supply and demand to illustrate how choices regarding the production and distribution of goods and services are made by firms and households in a market economy. Students will also examine the possibility of market failure and the appropriate government response. Policy topics may include poverty and homelessness, health care, the environment, antitrust, discrimination, international trade, unions, and minimum wage laws.
Prerequisites: Placement at the AQR level or completion of an FQR course or QR1.
Note(s): (Fulfills AQR, QR2 and social sciences requirements.) Information regarding credit for advanced placement is to be found under major/minor requirements.

EN 103 • Writing Seminar I • 4 • Suresh Archana Cukkemane
Introduction to expository writing with weekly writing assignments emphasizing skills in developing ideas, organizing material, and creating thesis statements. Assignments provide practice in description, definition, comparison and contrast, and argumentation. Additional focus on grammar, syntax, and usage.
Note(s): Students and instructor meet in seminar three hours a week; students are also required to meet regularly with a Writing Center tutor. This course does not fulfill the all-college requirement in expository writing.

EN 105 • Writing Seminar II: Food Fights • 4 • Lesley Caitlin Jorgensen
Everyone has a favorite food, and most have at least one food they won’t touch. But food is about more than taste: it references memory, community, language, and culture.  Sometimes that yields nostalgia; sometimes it produces conflict. In this class, we will examine food writing on a number of topics: What pleasure lies in food memory? How does food intersect with economics, language, social justice, history, and race? Who has the right to claim—and to profit from—the food of a particular culture? In the end, what should we eat—both for our own sake and for the sake of the planet?  

Our writing projects will range from nonfiction narrative to researched argument; our readings will range from memoir to persuasive text. You will develop your ability to analyze food writing, and you will learn how to enter into the debate using the tools of rhetoric. These tools include various types of appeals as well as strategies for invention (coming up with something to say), arrangement (organizing your thoughts), and style (writing clear, graceful, persuasive prose). There will be frequent formal and informal writing, peer review, revision exercises, and small-group workshopping. 

EN 105 • Writing Seminar II: Under the Influence • 4 • Thaddeus Niles
"Under the Influence - Argument and Persuasion in our Lives"
Argument seems inescapable. Its rituals have shaped the Western academic tradition, which is perhaps reason enough to study it more closely.  But argument is also a central feature of our lives as citizens and consumers. In this writing course, students will consider the nature of persuasion, various methods of thinking critically, and approaches to translating these methods to academic texts.  Class projects include essays examining the language and logic of persuasive appeals, as well as a final collaborative project.

EN 228 • Poetry and Magic • 3 • Margaret Greaves Ozgur
Poetry is the language of spells. With its musical properties like rhyme, meter, and repetition, poetry often works to seduce and entrance its readers. In this course, we will consider how poetic language transmogrifies the ordinary world into something strange. We will focus on poets who draw inspiration from magic and other supernatural phenomena, including John Milton, John Donne, William Blake, W.B. Yeats, Amiri Baraka, Sylvia Plath, James Merrill, and Lucille Clifton. Moving from Anglo-Saxon metrical charms to twentieth-century poems composed with Ouija boards, we will trace a long association between poetry and magic. We will also attend to how developments in science inflect poets’ responses to realms of the supernatural. Across our readings, we will consider how race, gender, and class shape poetic uses of magic. Assignments will include essays, quizzes, and a creative project. 
Note: Counts as a “Forms of Language and Literature: course 

GE 101 • Earth System Science• 4 • Kyle Nichols  
An introduction to Earth’s dynamic systems and geologic processes. The planet is studied from its deep interior to its oceanic, surficial, and atmospheric components to develop a scientific understanding of Earth as a holistic environmental system, of which the biosphere, including humanity, is one component. Within this context, course topics such as rocks and minerals, mountain building, earthquakes, volcanoes, glaciers, surface and groundwater, and resources are examined from the perspective of the interactions between geologic processes and humans.
Prerequisite: QR1. Note(s): (Fulfills QR2 requirement; FQR requirement; qualifies as a natural science laboratory course for breadth requirement.) 

GE 207 • Envionmental Geology • 4 • Kyle Nichols • Lab Fee: $50
Investigation of Earth’s environments as viewed through the study of surficial and crustal geologic processes. Emphasis is on natural and anthropogenic phenomena including earthquakes, volcanoes, floods, landslides, climate change, soil erosion, pollution, waste management, and energy resources. Laboratories and field trips highlight geologic perspectives on the environment.
Note(s): (Fulfills natural sciences requirement; fulfills scientific inquiry.)

HI 116H • Sea Changes: A History of the World's Oceans • 4 • Tillman Nechtman
A survey course in global history that takes the world’s oceans as its subject. Students will explore themes ranging from naval history to legal history, from environmental history to zoological history, and from the history of exploration and adventure to the history of imperialism and conquest. Students will work with primary and secondary sources and develop their analytical and writing skills as they ask questions about the field of history itself. What assumptions have historians made when they focus on nations and continents? What institutions and categories have they privileged with their focus? What have we missed because we look only at the history of land? How and why does history’s narrative shift when we undertake a “sea change” in our perspectives?
Note(s): (Fulfills social sciences requirement; fulfills humanistic inquiry and global cultural perspective.)

HI 247P • History of Modern Japan • 4 • Jennifer Day
An examination of the historical transformation of the Japanese archipelago from a feudal society to a modern state and imperial power, and to a postwar economic giant and a “bubble economy” in the 1990s. Students will explore how Japanese women and men have transformed elements of other cultures to create forms of government, society, and the arts that are uniquely Japanese. Sources include a diary, short stories, legal documents, and films.
Note(s): (Designated a non-Western culture course; fulfills social sciences requirement; fulfills humanistic inquiry and global cultural perspective.)

PS 101 • Introduction to Psychological Science • 4 • Deana Vitrano
An introduction to the science of psychology through a survey of theories, methods, and principles of behavior. Students will learn about empirical studies that are central to the various subdisciplines of psychology.

PS 218 • Cognition • 4 • Stephanie Crocco
The scientific study of the ways in which people encode, integrate, transform, and use information derived from their firsthand experiences and more indirect ones. While studying theories, methodologies, and research findings that are the hallmarks of cognitive psychology, students expand their understanding of these cognitive processes. The processes discussed include attention, consciousness, imagination, remembering, forgetting (and its failure), knowledge representation, narrative processing, reasoning, and decision-making. Students learn about the brain’s role by examining the neural mechanisms that underlie cognitive processes. Particular attention is given to writing as a way of discovering, integrating, and extending knowledge about the cognitive processes that are examined.
Prerequisites: PS 101 or NS 101.

PY 109 • Sound & Music with Lab • 4 • Jill Linz
The physical principles of sound - how it is produced, propagated and perceived. Emphasis will be placed on music and music theory and will look at some of the mechanisms used to produce different types of musical sounds as well as the physical principles guiding the development of music theory throughout history. The weekly lab sessions will provide hands-on experience in understanding the physical principles discussed in lecture.
Note(s): (Fulfills QR2 and natural sciences requirements.)

SO 101 • Sociological Perspectives • 3 • Phil Lewis
The basic concepts and principles of major sociological perspectives. Attention is given to how these perspectives have been developed and used by social scientists to explain social phenomena. Recommended as an introduction to the discipline.
Note(s): (Fulfills social sciences requirement.)

SW 324D • Advanced Special Studies in Social Work • 4 • Peter McCarthy

TH 304 • Special Studies in Acting • 3 • Garett Wilson
Students will train with and perform with The Saratoga Shakespeare Company, a professional regional theater company engaging Equity actors. Students will be cast in roles in a production and will then perform in the production over a two-week period. Training will involve techniques in Shakespearean acting, stage movement and combat, vocal work and career preparation. Students are eligible to join the Actors' Equity EMC (Equity Membership Candidate) program and will accrue five points towards Equity membership.
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

TH 305F • Design and Technical Theater • 3 • Garett Wilson

WLI 101 • Elementary Italian  • 4 • Barbara Garbin
An introduction to spoken and written Italian emphasizing cultural perspectives. Linguistic emphasis is on basic grammar, vocabulary, and the development of reading, conversation, and writing skills while learning about the culture of Italy.  

WLS 203 • Intermediate Spanish • 4 • Oscar A. Perez Hernandez
Continuing intensive study of the structures of the Spanish language. Extensive practice in conversation and writing. Vocabulary building through the reading of appropriate texts in the literature and culture.
Prerequisites: WLS 103.
Note(s): Four hours of class. (Fulfills language study.)

Course # • Course Title • Credits • Instructor • Lab Fee (if any)

CH 125 • Principles of Chemistry • 4 • Kimberly Frederick
An introduction to the fundamental principles of chemistry that provides one of the bases for the in-depth study of natural science disciplines; appropriate for students who intend to major in the natural sciences. Topics include atomic and molecular structure, periodic relationships, properties of gases, kinetics, equilibria, acids and bases, electrochemistry, and thermodynamics.  Laboratory experiments serve to illustrate concepts learned in the classroom. In both the classroom and laboratory, emphasis is placed on using quantitative reasoning skills to understand, interpret, and make predictions about chemical systems.
Prerequisites: (Placement at the AQR level or completion of an FQR course or QR1) and CH 115 or placement based on the online Chemistry diagnostic exam.
Note(s): Three hours of lecture/discussion and one three-hour lab per week. (Fulfills AQR, QR2, and natural sciences requirement.) Partially fulfills the writing requirement in the major.

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