Summer Sessions
 

2018 Summer Session Course Descriptions

Use the links below to jump to course descriptions for your desired Summer Session.

Summer Session 1: May 29- June 29, 2018

Course # • Course Title • Credits • Instructor • Lab Fee (if any)

AM-261D • Gaming in American Society • 4 • Aaron Pedinotti
This course explores the multivalent significance of videogaming to American society, and examines the many ways in which the diverse forms of gamic praxes have been represented in American culture.  Taking an interdisciplinary approach to these topics, it examines gaming as a set of socio-cultural practices with profound resonances and effects in American life.  Culturally oriented portions of the course focus on representations of gaming in films, television shows, genre fiction, and in games themselves.  Other portions focus on the intertwinement of gaming with broader social, political, and economic issues. These include questions of ethnic, racial, and gender diversity in games; the relationship of game industries and online worlds to America’s place in the global economy; the historical roles of gamic practices in US military planning and technological development; the increasing influence of online game communities and fan cultures in mainstream society; debates and moral panics over violence in games; and the potential role of games as educational, journalistic and persuasive technologies. Game genres studied in the course include console and pc-based videogames, war and strategy games, tabletop and massive multiplayer online RPGS, and virtual reality games.  Readings include theoretical texts, game studies literature, historical accounts of videogaming’s emergence and development, and cultural and ethnographic studies of American gaming.  Evaluation is based on reading responses, participation, and papers.  Some experiential engagement with gaming is also a part of the curriculum.

AN-251C • Globalization in the Americas • 3 • Christine Vassallo-Oby
In this course, we will conduct a thorough analysis of how globalization-- as a modality of ideas, technology, people, beliefs, language, and cultural nuances-- resonates in the Latin American and Caribbean context. We will explore the process of globalization through a study of multiple actors and physical environments. The purpose of this course is to truly understand what globalization is, how it impacts everyday lives, and how it is a process that ebbs and flows within the constraints of political and economic power. 

AR-111 • Basic Ceramics • 4 • Lauren Sandler • Lab Fee $75
Basic issues of aesthetics and technique developed through the direct manipulation of clay. A variety of forming techniques will be explored and demonstrated, including pinching, coiling, slab constructing, and throwing. In addition to group and individual critiques, weekly lectures will provide a working knowledge of kiln firing (both gas and electric) and clay and glaze formulation.
 
AR-136 • Digital Foundations • 4 • Joe Klockowski • Lab Fee $105
A survey of technological and aesthetic best practices and theory in visual communication. Students will study the basic functions and integral properties of Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, and other presentation and video editing software. Vector and raster imaging techniques, scanning, printing, and using digital images and typography are introduced through a series of demonstration/projects that build upon one another. Projects focus on design principles and basic skills needed to communicate a visual message with a specific intent. Note(s): (Fulfills arts requirement.)
 
AR-217 • Intermediate Ceramics • 4 • Lauren Sandler • Lab Fee $100
The continued development of aesthetic concepts and techniques. Individual exploration and expression will be encouraged. Through a structured approach with demonstrations, lectures, weekly assignments, and group and individual critiques, the student will be exposed to hand-building and throwing, as well as raku, salt-glazing, and stoneware reduction techniques.
Prerequisites: AR 111 or permission of instructor.
 
AR-223 • Intermediate Drawing • Joanne Vella • Lab fee $50
A further investigation of the formal and expressive characteristics of drawing, with a focus on drawing as visual communicative act. Structured assignments provide a context for focused exploration of materials and processes and development of individual vision. Readings and discussions will complement studio work.
Prerequisite: AR 133.
 
AR-311 • Intermediate Painting • 4 • Joanne Vella • Lab Fee $50
A continuation of painting concepts explored in AR 201, designed to further acquaint students with technical processes, formal relationships, and conceptual issues. Structured assignments employing direct observation (including the figure) and invention provide a context for development of a personal vision. Other assignments will refer to historical and contemporary movements and painting methods with readings and discussions.
Prerequisite: AR 201.
 
AR-318 • Advanced Ceramics • 4 • Lauren Sandler • Lab Fee $100 includes clay, glazes, and firings
A further intensification of the use of clay as a medium and a continuation of the development of the forming processes of hand-building and throwing. Also included will be the formulation of clay bodies and the investigation of kiln firing techniques.
Prerequisite: AR 217. Note(s): May be taken for credit three times with permission of instructor.
 
AR-326 • Advanced Drawing • 4 • Joanne Vella • Lab fee $50
A further investigation of drawing as a visual communicative act. The development of images through individual exploration of form, structure, and space with emphasis being placed upon the growth of personal vision and skill.
Prerequisites: AR 223 or AR 224. Note(s): May be taken for credit three times with permission of instructor.
 
AR-332 • Advanced Painting • 4 • Joanne Vella • Lab fee $50
Further investigation of formal, expressive, and technical aspects of painting. This course emphasizes individual exploration of structured assignments, leading toward self-directed studio practice. Readings and discussions complement studio practice. Emphasis is placed upon more individual exploration of assigned formal problems in the studio.
Prerequisites: AR 225 or AR 311. Note(s): May be taken for credit three times with permission of instructor.
 
CS-106 • Introduction to Computer Science I • 4 • Michael Eckmann
An introduction to the principles of design, implementation, and testing of object-oriented programs. The course covers language features such as control structures, classes, file I/0, and basic data structures including arrays. Other topics include recursion and fundamental algorithms, such as elementary searching and sorting algorithms.  May not be taken for credit by students who have taken or are currently taking CS 107 or CS 206.
Note(s): (Fulfills QR2 requirement.)
 
EC-104 • Intro to Microeconomics • 4 • Severin Carlson
An introduction to the study of markets. The course develops the basic economic model of supply and demand to illustrate how choices regarding the production and distribution of goods and services are made by firms and households in a market economy. The course also examines the possibility of market failure and the appropriate government response. Policy topics may include poverty and homelessness, health care, the environment, antitrust, discrimination, international trade, unions, and minimum wage laws.
Prerequisite: QR1. Note(s): (Fulfills QR2 and social sciences requirements.)
 
EN-213 • Poetry • 3 • Daniel Kraines
Designed to bring the general student into a familiar relationship with the language and structure of poetry. General readings from the whole range of English and American poetry from early ballads to contemporary free forms introduce students to representative poets and forms.
Note(s): Recommended preparation for advanced courses in poetry. (Fulfills humanities requirement.)
 
EX-361 • Biomechanics of Human Movement • 4 • Mary Roberts
An exploration of the principles of mechanics applied to the study of human motion, studying the internal and external forces acting on the body. Theory and hands-on learning activities and projects will provide students with methods for quantifying and describing motion and measuring forces and energetics of human movements. Special focus will be placed on the roles of muscles for the generation of force, work and power and for controlling movement.
Prerequisites: EX 111, EX 126, EX 127
 

GE-112  • Intro to Oceanography • 4 • Amy Frappier
Introduction to the interaction of physical, chemical, geological, and biological processes operative in the great water bodies that cover nearly three-quarters of the earth’s surface. Three hours of lecture, two hours of lab per week. Note(s): Fulfills natural sciences requirement; fulfills QR2 requirement.

HF-215 • Peer Health Education • 3 • Jennifer McDonald
An introduction to the concepts, principles, theory, and practice of health education, health promotion, and peer-based education. Students will engage with a variety of topics surrounding health, wellness, community health promotion, theories of behavioral change and leadership skill building through readings, class discussions, and opportunities for experiential learning. Throughout the semester students will research, plan, execute, and evaluate educational outreach materials and programs on various health and wellness topics relevant to college-aged students. 
Note(s): Not for liberal arts credit. Requires application and instructor approval: (https://www.skidmore.edu/health_promotion/peer/applicationform.php).
 
ID-235  l Social Entrepreneurship Practicum • 3 • Cyrus Boga
June 4 – June 29
An introduction to the tools and methods of social entrepreneurship to creatively and effectively address social challenges. Students will work through these concepts by designing their own project. Unlike many similar courses, we will take a holistic approach to the topic of social entrepreneurship, focusing in equal parts on (a) a systems approach to social challenges, (b) the social enterprise (or project), and (c) the social entrepreneur. This course is a hands-on, interactive study in how enterprises come to life to solve social challenges.
Note(s): This course is open to students from all disciplines. However, students who have had exposure to previous business courses and/or accounting may be better prepared for some of the course content.

MA-111 • Calculus I • 4 • Erin Lopez

Derivatives, integrals and their applications. Techniques of differentiation. Integration and differentiation of exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions.
Prerequisite: High school preparation including trigonometry. Note(s): (Fulfills QR2 requirement.)
 
 MB-214 • Foundations of Marketing • 3 • Azita Hirsa
A comprehensive assessment of marketing’s dynamic role in contemporary global society. The course emphasizes the development of marketing strategies which reflect domestic and cross-national competitive structures and diverse marketplace realities. Topics include consumer analyses, target market identification, positioning, e-commerce, ethics, sustainability, and coordination of marketing mix-elements.  This course covers the following dimensions for studying management and business in context: I, III, V.
Prerequisite: MB 107. 
 
MB-224 • Organizational Behavior • 3 • Azita Hirsa
The study of human behavior in the organizational context. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of topics in the area of organizational behavior through three levels of analysis (individual, group, and organizational). Topics covered may include: organizational theory; managing diversity; personality, values, and work attitudes; perception; decision making; motivation and goal setting; teamwork; conflict and negotiation; leadership, power, and influence tactics; organizational structure; organizational change; and organizational culture. This course incorporates the following dimensions for studying management and business in context: I, II, III, IV, V, VI. Coverage of the dimensions may vary per instructor.
Prerequisite: MB 107.
 
MB-333 • Business Law I • 3 • Scott Mulligan
A study of the origin of laws, philosophy of law and related ethical issues, and the court system and its legal procedures with emphasis on their impact in business and economic situations. Specific topics, which will be studied using a modified Socratic method and examination and briefing of case law, include contracts, agency, LLCs, corporations and partnerships. This course covers the following dimensions for studying management and business in context: I, VI.
 
PHDS-217 • Film Truth • 4 • William Lewis
An interdisciplinary investigation of the possibility of truth and objectivity in documentary film. Students will examine the history of documentary practice and theory, including topics such as mimetic theory, narrative realism, scientific truth, juridical truth, institutional truth, film truth, direct cinema, self-reflexive cinema, and constructivism. The course will integrate methods from philosophy, aesthetics, and film studies.
Note(s): Fulfills humanities requirement.
 
PL-103 • Intro to Comparative Politics • 3 • Megan Turnbull
A survey of the key concepts and principles of comparative politics and international relations. Issues covered include state building and state failure; the functioning of democratic and non-democratic regimes and the ideologies that support them; the changing nature of the international system; the causes of war and search for peace; and problems of national and transnational security, such as terrorism, globalization, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, and environmental challenges.
Note(s): (Fulfills social sciences requirement.)
 
PL-251B • Africa’s Rise • 3 • Megan Turnbull
Once labeled "the hopeless continent," the political and economic developments in Africa today suggest the exact opposite.  Africa's economies are among the fastest growing in the world, with at least a dozen countries enjoying a growth rate of six percent or higher since the mid-1990s. The number of democracies on the continent has risen from a mere three in 1989 to twenty-three in 2008. What explains these political, economic, and social changes? How are emerging African economies re-shaping world politics and international markets? What are the consequences of China's increasing role in the region? To answer these questions, we will travel through Africa's recent political history, beginning with colonial rule and its legacies, the independence movements and development policies of the 1960s, economic crises, foreign aid, civil war in the 1970s and 1980s, and the wave of democratization and economic growth starting in the mid-1990s to today.
 
PY-207 • General Physics I with Lab • 4 • Jill Linz
A calculus-based introduction to the concepts and principles of mechanics, emphasizing translational and rotational kinematics and dynamics, work and energy, conservation laws, and gravitation. Hands-on exploration of physical systems using computer interfaced laboratory equipment and spreadsheet modeling techniques are used to elucidate physical principles.
Prerequisite: QR1. Corequisite: MA 111. Note(s): Five hours of lecture, guided activities, laboratory experiments, and problem-solving per week. (Fulfills QR2 and natural sciences requirements.) 
 
SO-101 • Sociological Perspectives • 3 • Amon Emeka
The basic concepts and principles of major sociological perspectives. Attention is given to how these perspectives have been developed and used by social scientists to explain social phenomena. Recommended as an introduction to the discipline.
Note(s): (Fulfills social sciences requirement.)
 
SO-229 • Visual Sociology • 4 • Rik Scarce
An introduction to visual sociology as both an analytical tool for more deeply understanding the visual in society and as a means of conveying the results of sociological research. Students will develop the theoretical and conceptual tools necessary to ask more critical questions of the visual world around them and, by producing a sociological documentary of their own, the technical skills to communicate in visual media. No prior experience with videography is required. Students are strongly encouraged to have taken at least one Sociology course beyond the gateway class.
Prerequisites: One sociology gateway course (SO 101 or SO 201 or SO 202 or SO 203 or SO 204).
 
TH-140 • Introduction to Directing • 3 • John Michael DiResta
An overview of the essential elements of stage directing. Students will analyze play texts and directing theories as well as engage in active lab work in understanding dramatic action, composition, and picturization in a variety of spaces, which will provide the foundation for working with actors. Students will also analyze plays, study the expression of directorial concepts, and communicate with actors through class exercises and scene work reinforcing the idea of the director as a collaborator as well as the primary leader and communicator about the play before and during the rehearsal process. Students will develop time-management strategies, enabling them to craft a rehearsal schedule by which to build the play and move the rehearsal process forward. Theoretical texts and articles about directors and play texts will provide one context for these analyses. In the studio, students will work as actors and directors.
Prerequisite: TH 103 

WLS-101 • Elementary Spanish I • 4 • Diana Barnes
An introduction to spoken and written Spanish emphasizing cultural perspectives. Linguistic emphasis is on basic grammar, vocabulary, and the development of reading, conversation, and writing skills while learning about the cultures of Spain and Spanish America. Instructor approval required.

WLS-103 • Alternative Second Semester of Spanish • 3 • Beatriz Loyola
An introduction and review of elementary spoken and written Spanish emphasizing cultural perspectives. Linguistic emphasis is on grammar, vocabulary, and the development of reading, conversation, and writing skills while learning about the cultures of Spain and Spanish America. Instructor approval required.
Note(s): For students who have completed one or two years of pre-college Spanish, and who have not placed in WLS 203 or above. Open to students who have completed WLS 101.

 

Summer Session 2: July 2 – August 3, 2018

Course # • Course Title • Credits • Instructor • Lab Fee (if any)

AN-101 • Intro to Cultural Anthropology • 3 • Christine Vassallo-Oby
An overview of concepts, theories, and methods of cultural anthropology. Students learn about central anthropological topics, such as kinship, gender, class, race, environment, ritual and religion, ethnicity, economy, and politics, and gain understanding and appreciation for cultural differences.
Note(s): (Fulfills social sciences requirement.)
 
AR-101 • Intro to Painting • 3 • Hannah Morris • Lab Fee $60
An introduction to painting as a medium of visual expression. Emphasis is placed upon exploration of formal and technical concerns. Basic studies include drawing and will explore a variety of subject matter and media directed toward the organization of the two-dimensional plane.
Note(s): Summer only. Not open to Skidmore art majors.
 
AR-101Z • Intro to Painting Workshop • 0 •  Hannah Morris • Lab Fee $60
An introduction to painting as a medium of visual expression. Emphasis is placed upon exploration of formal and technical concerns. Basic studies include drawing and will explore a variety of subject matter and media directed toward the organization of the two-dimensional plane.
Note(s): Summer only. Not open to Skidmore art majors.
 
AR-133 • Drawing I • 4 • Kathy Hemingway-Jones • Lab Fee $50
This course builds on basic drawing experiences, refining skills in observation, organization, interpretation, and critical analysis. Studio work introduces a range of traditional drawing tools and materials while exploring a variety of approaches to image making and visual expression.
 
AR-133Z • Drawing Workshop • 0 • Kathy Hemingway-Jones • Lab Fee $50
This course builds on basic drawing experiences, refining skills in observation, organization, interpretation, and critical analysis. Studio work introduces a range of traditional drawing tools and materials while exploring a variety of approaches to image making and visual expression.
 
AR-264H • Paper Print Press • 4 • Patrick Casey • Lab Fee $100
Starting with the creation of their printing papers students will explore different traditional paper making and printmaking techniques. Both Nepalese style and Western style, paper-making will be taught along with relief, chine colle, and letterpress printing techniques. This course will have the student consider the image they make, as well as the surface it sits on, the paper. While the skills are traditional, the ideas explored for the projects completed in class will be contemporary. 

AR-264Z • Paper Print Press Workshop • 0 • Patrick Casey • Lab Fee $100
Starting with the creation of their printing papers students will explore different traditional paper making and printmaking techniques. Both Nepalese style and Western style, paper-making will be taught along with relief, chine colle, and letterpress printing techniques. This course will have the student consider the image they make, as well as the surface it sits on, the paper. While the skills are traditional, the ideas explored for the projects completed in class will be contemporary.  

AR-264J • Research to Artwork • 4 • Sophie Isaak, Katie DeGroot • Lab Fee $100
This course will ask students to work from both assigned and self-determined subject matter to research, and to collect, material for creating artwork. Drawing, collage, printmaking, photography, and bookmaking techniques will be used to respond to the information gathered. Discussion and presentation of various artists’ work, along with readings and critiques, will support the studio explorations.
 
AR-264Z • Research to Artwork Workshop • 0 • Sophie Isaak, Katie DeGroot • Lab Fee $100
This course will ask students to work from both assigned and self-determined subject matter to research, and to collect, material for creating artwork. Drawing, collage, printmaking, photography, and bookmaking techniques will be used to respond to the information gathered. Discussion and presentation of various artists’ work, along with readings and critiques, will support the studio explorations.
 
BI-170 • Human Genetics • 4 • Bernard Possidente • Lab fee $80
An introduction to the principles of genetics and their application to human biology. Topics include the history of genetics; the structure, function, and inheritance of genes; medical genetics; and genetic engineering.
Note(s): Academic Year: Three hours of lecture, two hours of lab per week.
Summer: Nine hours of lecture, six hours of lab per week. (Fulfills natural sciences and QR2 requirements.)
 
CH-115 • Fundamentals of Chemistry • 4 • Beatrice Kendall
An Introductory course for students with little to no background in chemistry. Fundamental chemical concepts such as atomic structure, bonding, chemical reactions, and the properties of solids, liquids, and gases are presented.  Emphasis is placed on learning the “language of chemistry,” achieving the ability to visualize and understand process on an atomic and molecular level, and developing problem solving skills. Laboratory exercises and experiments serve to illustrate concepts presented in the lecture. This course is appropriate for students preparing to take Chemistry 125-Principles of Chemistry and for students who seek a one-semester survey of the subject.
Prerequisites: QR1 and placement based on an online diagnostic exam. Note(s): May not be used to satisfy major or minor requirements in chemistry or biology. (Fulfills QR2 and natural sciences requirements.)
 
CS-206 • Introduction to Computer Science II • 4 • Thomas O’Connell
Fundamentals of software development and algorithm design. Topics include recursion, data structures, analysis of algorithms, and program verification.
Prerequisites: CS 106 or CS 107 or permission of instructor.
 
EN-103 • Writing Seminar I • 4 • Paul Fogle
Introduction to expository writing with weekly writing assignments emphasizing skills in developing ideas, organizing material, and creating thesis statements. Assignments provide practice in description, definition, comparison and contrast, and argumentation. Additional focus on grammar, syntax, and usage.
Note(s): Students and instructor meet in seminar three hours a week; students are also required to meet regularly with a Writing Center tutor. This course does not fulfill the all-college requirement in expository writing.
 
EN-105 • Writing Seminar II • 4 •  François Bonneville, Thaddeus Niles
This seminar immerses students in the process of producing finished analytical essays informed by critical reading and careful reasoning. Special attention is given to developing ideas, writing from sources, organizing material, and revising drafts. Additional emphasis is on grammar, style, and formal conventions of writing. Students respond to one another’s work in workshops or peer critique sessions. Occasional informal writing complements assignments of longer finished papers.
Note(s): (This course fulfills the all-college requirement in expository writing.)
 
EX-111 ● Intro to Exercise Science ● 4 ● Justin Faller
An introduction to the scientific basis of physical activity. Emphasis is placed upon the study of the physiological change and adaptations that occur as a result of the stress of exercise. Students will be active participants in laboratory experiments that examine the body’s response to exercise. Three hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory per week.
Note(s): (Fulfills natural sciences requirement.)
 
GE-101 • Earth Systems Science • 4 • Kyle Nichols
An introduction to Earth’s dynamic systems and geologic processes. The planet is studied from its deep interior to its oceanic, surficial, and atmospheric components to develop a scientific understanding of Earth as a holistic environmental system, of which the biosphere, including humanity, is one component. Within this context, course topics such as rocks and minerals, mountain building, earthquakes, volcanoes, glaciers, surface and groundwater, and resources are examined from the perspective of the interactions between geologic processes and humans.
Prerequisite: QR1. Note(s): Three hours of lecture, two hours of lab per week. (Fulfills QR2 requirement; qualifies as a natural science laboratory course for breadth requirement.)
 
HI-111 • Intro to Latin American History • 3 • Katherine Paarlberg-Kvam
An introduction to the economic, political, social, and intellectual history of Latin America. Organized thematically and chronologically, topics emphasize understanding the emergence of the colonies of Spain, Portugal, France, and England into a group of distinct nation-states. Students will explore Latin American society from initial encounters among Europeans, Africans, and Native Americans. We then study independence: political, economic, and social challenges of early nation-state formation in a multicultural context. We conclude with the twentieth century, addressing topics such as industrialization, revolution, U.S.-Latin American relations, and selected intellectual trends.
Note(s): Not open to students who have successfully completed HI 109. (Fulfills Cultural Diversity requirement, fulfills social sciences requirement.)
 
MA-108 • Calculus with Algebra I • 3 • Emelie Kenney
An introduction to derivatives, integrals, and their applications. Primarily for students who are not adequately prepared for MA 111, this course (together with MA 109) covers the same material as MA 111 but integrates the material requisite to calculus with the calculus itself. Note that MA 108 alone cannot be used as a substitute for MA 111. Successful completion of MA 108 and MA 109 is equivalent to completion of MA 111.
Prerequisite: QR1.
 
MA-200 • Linear Algebra • 4 • Rachel Roe-Dale
Vector spaces, matrices and linear transformations, determinants, solution of linear equations.
Prerequisite: High school preparation including trigonometry. Note(s): (Fulfills QR2 requirement.)
 
MB-358 • Human Resource Management • 4 • Azita Hirsa
Explores the history, theory, and practice of human resource management (HRM). The course focuses on thinking systematically, strategically, and ethically about managing employees. Students examine the importance of recruitment, selection, diversity, job design, performance appraisals, training, and compensation to both the worker and the organization. This course covers the following dimensions for studying management and business in context: I, III, VI.
Prerequisite: MB 107.
 
MF-101 • Intro to Media Studies • 4 • Aaron Pedinotti
This course provides an introduction to key topics and analytical frameworks in the fields of Media and Film Studies.  It is structured around four main units focusing on the technologies of film, radio, television, and new media.  Each unit introduces techniques of formal and technical analysis concerning the medium to which it pertains, and covers differing theoretical perspectives on the nature of that medium.  Major themes of the course include the difference between deterministic and non-deterministic understandings of media technologies, the nature and extent and media’s effect on society, and the relationship(s) of media to social forces, history, and power.  Lessons include lectures, film and television screenings, radio listening sessions, and various forms of experiential engagement with new media.  Assignments and in-class exercises involve formal analyses of texts and artifacts and the comparative application of different theoretical perspectives to contemporary media landscapes.  Because the topic of media is inextricably tied up with the topic of communication, active participation in class discussions is an important component of this course’s evaluative criteria.
 
MP-195 • Class Study of Jazz Piano • 2 • John Nazarenko
Study of jazz piano voicings, scales, and modes for improvisation. Left-hand chording patterns, harmonic structures, and accompanying scales will be emphasized. Other areas of study will include diatonic and chromatic voice leading, phrasing and solo development, functional harmony, bass lines, and solo jazz piano technique. Class will read selected jazz charts and listen to and analyze contemporary and historical jazz pianists.
Note(s): Not for liberal arts credit. (Fulfills arts requirement.)
 
PH-207 • Introduction to Logic • 3 • Peter Murray
An introduction to the basic concepts and methods of modern symbolic logic, with a focus on their application to proper reasoning. Students learn how to represent sentences in logical notation, to reconstruct arguments in that notation, to assess arguments for validity and soundness, and to prove conclusions from premises using a system of natural deduction. Students also learn to recognize common argument forms and common mistakes in reasoning (fallacies), are introduced to philosophical issues related to logic, and learn how symbolic logic is the basis for the digital computer.
Note(s): (Fulfills QR2 requirement.)
 
PY-109 • Physics: Sound and Music • 4 • Jill Linz
The physical principles of sound-how it is produced, propagated, and perceived. Illumination of principles will emphasize examples from music. Mechanisms used to produce different types of musical sounds will be discussed as well as the physical principles behind the reproduction of music in its many forms, such as radio, tape recorders, and CD players. The laboratory component will include measurement of the speed of sound, frequency analysis of musical instruments, and sound recording.
Note(s): (Fulfills QR2 and natural sciences requirements.)
 
RE-103 • Religion and Culture • 4 • Thomas Davis
An introductory study of the nature of religion, the interaction of religion and culture, and the function of religious belief in the life of the individual. Consideration will be given to such phenomena as myth and ritual, sacred time and space, mysticism, evil, conversion, and salvation. Readings will be drawn from classical and modern sources.
Note(s): (Fulfills humanities requirement.)
 
SO-101 • Sociological Perspectives • 3 • Philip Lewis
The basic concepts and principles of major sociological perspectives. Attention is given to how these perspectives have been developed and used by social scientists to explain social phenomena. Recommended as an introduction to the discipline.
Note(s): (Fulfills social sciences requirement.)
 
TH-304 • Theater Performance • 3 • Lary Opitz
Students will train with and perform with The Saratoga Shakespeare Company, a professional regional theater company engaging Equity actors. Students will be cast in roles in a production and will then perform in the production over a two week period. Training will involve techniques in Shakespearean acting, stage movement and combat, vocal work and career preparation. Students are eligible to join the Actors' Equity EMC (Equity Membership Candidate) program and will accrue five points towards Equity membership. Requires permission of instructor.
 
TH-305F •  Theater Production • 3 • Lary Opitz 
Students will be involved in various aspects of production and/or arts management with The Saratoga Shakespeare Company, a professional regional theater engaging Equity actors. Students will have a variety of opportunities to train and work in the areas of scenic construction, sound reinforcement, stage management, costume construction, arts management, and career development throughout the five week rehearsal and performance period. Requires permission of instructor.
 
WLI-101 • Elementary Italian I • 4 • Barbara Garbin
An introduction to spoken and written Italian emphasizing cultural perspectives. Linguistic emphasis is on basic grammar, vocabulary, and the development of reading, conversation, and writing skills while learning about the culture of Italy.
 
WLS-203 • Intermediate Spanish • 4 • Oscar Perez Hernandez
Continuing intensive study of the structures of the Spanish language. Extensive practice in conversation and writing. Vocabulary building through the reading of appropriate texts in the literature and culture.
Prerequisites: WLS 102 or WLS 103. Note(s): Four hours of class.
 
 

Summer Session 3: May 29 - August 3, 2018

Course # • Course Title • Credits • Instructor • Lab Fee (if any)

CH-221 • Organic Chemistry I • 5 • Kara Cetto Bales  
The structures, physical properties, reactivity, and reaction mechanisms of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons are investigated. The lab introduces the student to synthesis, purification, and chemical and spectroscopic methods of characterizing organic compounds. Note(s): Three hours of lecture-discussion and four hours of lab per week. Prerequisites: CH-106, CH-107H, or CH-125.

  

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