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Skidmore College
Summer Sessions
COVID-19 UPDATE: On April 13, the College announced its decision to cancel Summer Session 1 and Summer Session 2 courses for 2020. The courses will not be offered online. Summer internships-for-credit and independent studies remain as options for Skidmore students for this summer and may be arranged through the normal processes detailed here.

2020 Summer Session course descriptions

Use the links below to view 2020 course offerings.

 

2020 Course Descriptions 


 

Summer Session 1: June 1–July 2, 2020

Course # • Course Title • Credits • Instructor • Lab Fee (if any)

AN 102 • Anthropology of the Human Past • 3 • Ryan Clasby
An introduction to the biological and cultural evolution of humans. In learning about the origins of human diversity, students come to understand concepts of time, space, and context as critical factors in our ability to reconstruct the human past. Students engage in a variety of scientific evaluation sessions involving data common to archaeological analysis of human evolutionary and cultural change to learn how this reconstruction occurs. 
Note(s): (Fulfills social sciences requirement.)

AN 351D • Language and Culture • 4 • Michael Ennis-McMillan
An examination of human language as a cultural phenomenon. Students learn basic concepts and techniques from linguistic anthropology to study the interrelationship of human thought, communication, culture, and social action. Topics include semiotics, the structure of language, linguistic diversity and relativity, performativity, and language learning. We also consider how the interdependence of language relates to class, race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. Students explore applied linguistic anthropology methods for documenting cultural heritage. Prior social science coursework is recommended. 
Prerequisite: AN-101 or permission of instructor. M. Ennis-McMillan

BI 152 • Pestilence: The 4th Horsemen • 4 • Patricia Hilleren • Lab Fee $80The course title is a play on The Four Horseman of the Apocalypse from the Book of Revelation, the last book of the New Testament of the Bible (6:1-8).  In this vision, the manifestation of the four horsemen (Pestilence or Disease, Famine, War and Death) purportedly anticipates Judgment Day- the end of the world.  In this course we will explore the topic of pestilence, with a focus on infectious disease and the roles that a variety of microbes (bacteria, protozoa and viruses) play in this process. To fully appreciate infectious disease, we must examine the interactions of microbes with the human host.  To that end, this course is also an introduction to some of the fundamental structures (e.g. tissues, cells, genomes, and proteins) that comprise the human organism.  As the course progresses, we will explore how representatives of three categories of microbes (bacteria, protozoa and viruses) disrupt the physiology of a ‘healthy’ cell/organism- leading to a state of disease.  We will also learn how medical interventions aim to mitigate these diseases. The laboratory portion of the course will focus on learning how scientists study bacteria- one of the predominant classes of microbes that cause infectious disease. The lab experience offers you the opportunity to i) learn and develop skills in scientific thinking and process; ii) practice a variety of technical skills including sterile technique, bacterial cell culture, light microscopy, bacterial transformation, and viral plaque assays and iii) gain skills in the interpretation and communication of scientific ideas and results.

CS 106 • Introduction to Computer Science I • 4 • Michael Eckmann
An introduction to the principles of design, implementation, and testing of object-oriented programs. The course covers language features such as control structures, classes, file I/0, and basic data structures including arrays. Other topics include recursion and fundamental algorithms, such as elementary searching and sorting algorithms.  May not be taken for credit by students who have taken or are currently taking CS 107 or CS 206.
Note(s): (Fulfills QR2 requirement.)

EN 225 • Introduction to Shakespeare  • 3 • Joseph Cermatori
This course offers an introductory look at Shakespeare's comedies, histories, tragedies, and romances. We will raise questions about: Shakespeare's language and dramaturgy; how the plays have been staged and performed historically; what meanings they held within their early modern context; and how and why they continue to resonate today. Students will watch performances and will occasionally stage moments from the plays in class. 
Note(s): (Fulfills humanities requirement.)

GE 101 • Earth Systems Science • 4 • Kyle Nichols • Lab Fee $50
An introduction to Earth’s dynamic systems and geologic processes. The planet is studied from its deep interior to its oceanic, surficial, and atmospheric components to develop a scientific understanding of Earth as a holistic environmental system, of which the biosphere, including humanity, is one component. Within this context, course topics such as rocks and minerals, mountain building, earthquakes, volcanoes, glaciers, surface and groundwater, and resources are examined from the perspective of the interactions between geologic processes and humans.
Prerequisite: QR1.
Note(s): Three hours of lecture, two hours of lab per week. (Fulfills QR2 requirement; qualifies as a natural science laboratory course for breadth requirement.)

GE 207 • Environmental Geology • 4 • Kyle Nichols • Lab Fee $50
Investigation of Earth’s environments as viewed through the study of surficial and crustal geologic processes. Emphasis is on natural and anthropogenic phenomena including earthquakes, volcanoes, floods, landslides, climate change, soil erosion, pollution, waste management, and energy resources. Laboratories and field trips highlight geologic perspectives on the environment.
Note(s): Three hours of lecture, three hours of lab per week. Fulfills natural sciences requirement.

HI 247P • History of Modern Japan • 4 • Jennifer Day
This course charts the historical transformation of the Japanese archipelago from a feudal society to a modern state and imperial power, and finally to an economic giant and consumer economy in the 20th century.  The Japan we begin with is a regional backwater, ambitious but detached from the world system, comprising pockets of peasants, samurai, and merchants who identify themselves with their local districts and not (as we might expect) with the Tokugawa government or “Japan” in any sense of the word; the Japan we end with is an economic powerhouse, a cosmopolitan nation state with a parliamentary system of government, where the people do, by and large, think of themselves as Japanese.  In between, we see the emergence of participatory citizenship, the rise of imperialism, the devastation of war, the humiliation of defeat and military occupation, the post-war economic boom, the bursting bubble, and the aging population.
Note(s): (Designated a non-Western culture course; fulfills social sciences requirement.)

HI 251D • Topics in History: Fascism Past and Present • 4 • Matthew Hockenos
What is fascism? What is the appeal of an ideology that advocates intolerance, sexism, racism, xenophobia, and war? What were the roots of fascism and how did fascism manifest itself in Europe in the middle of the twentieth century? The current popularity of far-right populist parties and politicians in Europe and elsewhere makes these questions all the more urgent today. This course examines the origins, nature, and history of fascism in Europe between the two world wars and the resurgence of the far right in Europe and the U.S. in the twenty-first century.
Note(s):
May be repeated for credit if topic is different. When offered as “American Indian History,” fulfills cultural diversity requirement. (Fulfills social sciences requirement.)

IA 257D • Cyberwar: States, Industry, Hackers and Global Security • 4 • Scott Mulligan
From electronic sabotage of the Iranian nuclear program and the collapse of the Estonian internet, to Chinese and North Korean hackers stealing American corporate secrets, Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election and widespread power outages in the Ukraine, a new electronic battlefield has emerged in which states and non-state actors alike are engaged in a dynamic new arms race, one which does not respect sovereign borders. What are the rules for 21st century cyberspace conflicts between nation-states? How should responsibility for safeguarding key infrastructure and critical information from cyberattacks be allocated between governments and private industry, as well as among cybersecurity, social media and e-commerce providers? What will be the impact of these attacks on the coming 2020 presidential election?  This course will explore the rapidly changing face of cyberwarfare, cyberterrorism and cybercrime, combining political, economic, business, legal, ethical and technological perspectives. Students will critically evaluate cybersecurity from the standpoint of national governments, the private sector businesses and non-state actors (e.g. terrorists and hackers) as well as international law and politics. Students will employ interdisciplinary perspectives as they consider a range of policy perspectives concerning homeland security (i.e., critical infrastructure protection), privacy/data breaches, intellectual property theft/corporate industrial espionage, cybercrime (e.g. terrorism financing and organized crime) and interstate cyberwarfare. The private and governmental organizations involved in the formulation of broader policies, as well as in implementing cybersecurity technologies and strategies, will be examined to gain a better understanding of the interactions between political, economic business and technical dimensions of cyber-conflict amid concerns for confidential business information and national security.
Prerequisites: IA 101.
Note(s): Fulfills IA Knowledge Cluster I: The Political World.

MA 200 • Linear Algebra • 4 • Cristobal Lemus-Vadales
Vector spaces, matrices and linear transformations, determinants, solution of linear equations.
Prerequisites: High school preparation including trigonometry.  Requires AQR placement. (Fulfills QR2 requirement)

MB 214 • Foundations of Marketing • 3 • Azita Hirsa
A comprehensive assessment of marketing’s dynamic role in contemporary global society. The course emphasizes the development of marketing strategies which reflect domestic and cross-national competitive structures and diverse marketplace realities. Topics include consumer analyses, target market identification, positioning, e-commerce, ethics, sustainability, and coordination of marketing mix-elements.  This course covers the following dimensions for studying management and business in context: I, III, V.
Prerequisite: MB 107. 

MB 224 • Foundations of Organizational Behavior • 3 • Azita Hirsa
The study of human behavior in the organizational context. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of topics in the area of organizational behavior through three levels of analysis (individual, group, and organizational). Topics covered may include: organizational theory; managing diversity; personality, values, and work attitudes; perception; decision making; motivation and goal setting; teamwork; conflict and negotiation; leadership, power, and influence tactics; organizational structure; organizational change; and organizational culture. This course incorporates the following dimensions for studying management and business in context: I, II, III, IV, V, VI. Coverage of the dimensions may vary per instructor.
Prerequisite: MB 107.

MB 234 • Foundations of Financial Accounting • 4 • Joseph Diamante
An introductory course in financial accounting examining the process of accumulating accounting information for decision-makers outside the organization. It introduces the accounting process, reviews the preparation of financial statements, and examines the accounting for assets and liabilities. The course focuses on the preparation, interpretation and effective use of financial statements and other financial data
Prerequisites: MB 107

MB 333 • Business Law I • 3 • Scott Mulligan
A study of the origin of laws, philosophy of law and related ethical issues, and the court system and its legal procedures with emphasis on their impact in business and economic situations. Specific topics, which will be studied using a modified Socratic method and examination and briefing of case law, include contracts, agency, LLCs, corporations and partnerships. This course covers the following dimensions for studying management and business in context: I, VI.

MF 251D • Screenwriting • 4 • Nicole Coady
Students will learn the classic Hollywood three-act structure for creating a screenplay.  They will learn how to craft a compelling logline, as well as create a skeleton treatment from which to build their story.  They will develop a final film treatment, which can be shared with other participants in the often collaborative work of making movies. The craft of storytelling for the screen will be honed through examining landmark films.  We will put what we learn into practice through writing our own feature-length screenplay. 

PH 207 • Introduction to Logic • 4 • Peter Murray
An introduction to the basic concepts and methods of modern symbolic logic, with a focus on their application to proper reasoning. Students learn how to represent sentences in logical notation, to reconstruct arguments in that notation, to assess arguments for validity and soundness, and to prove conclusions from premises using a system of natural deduction. Students also learn to recognize common argument forms and common mistakes in reasoning (fallacies), to graphically represent text-based arguments using collaborative online software, are introduced to philosophical issues related to logic, and learn how symbolic logic is the basis for the digital computer.
Note(s):(Fulfills QR2 requirement.)

PHDS 217 • Film Truth • 4 • William Lewis
An interdisciplinary investigation of the possibility of truth and objectivity in documentary film. Students will examine the history of documentary practice and theory, including topics such as mimetic theory, narrative realism, scientific truth, juridical truth, institutional truth, film truth, direct cinema, self-reflexive cinema, and constructivism. The course will integrate methods from philosophy, aesthetics, and film studies.
Note(s): Fulfills humanities requirement.

PL 103 • Introduction to Comparative and International Politics • 3 • Collin Grimes
A survey of the key concepts and principles of comparative politics and international relations. Issues covered include state building and state failure; the functioning of democratic and non-democratic regimes and the ideologies that support them; the changing nature of the international system; the causes of war and search for peace; and problems of national and transnational security, such as terrorism, globalization, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, and environmental challenges.
Note(s): (Fulfills social sciences requirement.)

PS 205 • Social Psychology • 4 • Ellen O’Malley
A survey of theory and research on the nature and causes of individual behavior (thoughts, feelings, actions) in social situations.
Prerequisites: PS 101.

PS 210 • Personality • 4 • Conor O’Dea
Considers major theories of personality to gain an understanding of how genetic and environmental factors interact to influence human behavior.
Prerequisites: PS 101.

PS 214 • Psychological Disorders • 4 • Rachel Mann-Rosan
An introduction to the history and study of psychological disorders (e.g., substance use disorders, psychotic disorders, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, personality disorders) with an emphasis on understanding the development of disorders, diagnostic issues, and symptoms.
Prerequisites: PS 101

SO 223W • Environmental Sociology • 4 • Rik Scarce
An exploration of social-environment interactions. More than any other species, humans adapt their environments to suit their purposes. This course explores those purposes, including the roles that corporations, public policy, class, gender, race, and other social factors play in altering the environment and the resulting effects on people and places. Specific topics addressed include the environmental movement, environmental justice, and the political economy of the environment. Because many students will also be enrolled in Statistics for the Social Sciences this summer, one or more of the assignments in the class will require students to explore quantitative approaches to understanding the environment-society nexus. The “W” in the course number designates this class as a Sociology writing-intensive course.
Prerequisites: one gateway course (SO 101 or SO 201 or SO 202 or SO 203 or SO 204, or ES 100).

SO 226 • Statistics for the Social Sciences • 4 • Amon Emeka
An introduction to the use of quantitative analysis in social science research. This course involves the study and application of statistical measures of central tendency, diversity, and correlation that will allow students to answer empirical questions about the nature of social relations.  Students will use computers and statistical software to analyze large data sets and also to produce written reports and presentations of the statistical results they generate.  Because many students will also be enrolled in Environmental Sociology this summer, one or more of the assignments in the class will require students to employ quantitative methods to better understand the environment-society nexus.
Prerequisites: QR1 and two courses in the social sciences.
Note(s):Letter grade only. (Fulfills AQR and QR2 requirement.)

SW 212 • Social Work Values and Populations at Risk • 3 • Peter McCarthy
This course introduces social work values; it provides students an opportunity to identify and clarify conflicting values and ethical dilemmas; and, it examines the impact of discrimination, economic deprivation, and oppression on groups distinguished by race, ethnicity, culture, class, gender, sexual orientation, religion, physical or mental ability, age, and national origin. Students learn assessment and intervention skills that enable social workers to serve diverse populations and to promote social and economic justice.
Note(s):(Fulfills social sciences requirement; designated a Cultural Diversity course.)  

TH 104 • Introduction to Acting • 3 • Dennis Schebetta
Students will build foundational acting skills through an introduction to improvisational and text-based exercises designed to free their impulses and develop their imagination in a creative state of play. This class will introduce the student to various performance methodologies including Stanislavski-based techniques as well as ensemble-based and physical/vocal approaches. Students will then apply these methodologies as they work on a monologue and a scene.
Prerequisites: TH 103.
Note(s): (Fulfills arts requirement.)

TH 140 • Introduction to Directing • 3 • John Michael DiResta
An overview of the essential elements of stage directing. Students will analyze play texts and directing theories as well as engage in active lab work in understanding dramatic action, composition, and picturization in a variety of spaces, which will provide the foundation for working with actors. Students will also analyze plays, study the expression of directorial concepts, and communicate with actors through class exercises and scene work reinforcing the idea of the director as a collaborator as well as the primary leader and communicator about the play before and during the rehearsal process. Students will develop time-management strategies, enabling them to craft a rehearsal schedule by which to build the play and move the rehearsal process forward. Theoretical texts and articles about directors and play texts will provide one context for these analyses. In the studio, students will work as actors and directors.
Prerequisite: TH 103 

TH 230 • Theater & Culture II • 3 • Lisa Jackson-Schebetta

What kinds of relationships exist between theatre and culture across time and geography? How do practices of theatre change through time, under what circumstances, and why? How do practices of theatre make meaning, ask questions, and tell stories with and about cultural change? In this course, we will examine relationships between theatre and culture through historiographical methods. We will explore sites, movements, and events from the late 1800s to the mid 1990s, around the world. 
Note(s):(Fulfills humanities requirement.)

WLS 101 • Elementary Spanish I  • 4 • Diana Barnes
An introduction to spoken and written Spanish emphasizing cultural perspectives. Linguistic emphasis is on basic grammar, vocabulary, and the development of reading, conversation, and writing skills while learning about the cultures of Spain and Spanish America.
Prerequisite: Instructor approval.

WLS 103 • Alternative Second Semester of Spanish • 3 • Beatriz Loyola
An introduction and review of elementary spoken and written Spanish emphasizing cultural perspectives. Linguistic emphasis is on grammar, vocabulary, and the development of reading, conversation, and writing skills while learning about the cultures of Spain and Spanish America.
Prerequisite: Instructor approval.
Note(s): For students who have completed one or two years of pre-college Spanish, and who have not placed in WLS 203 or above. Open to students who have completed WLS 101.


 

Summer Session 2: July 7–August 7, 2020

Course # • Course Title • Credits • Instructor • Lab Fee (if any)

AN-101 • Intro to Cultural Anthropology • 3 • Christine Vassallo-ObyAnthropology is a lot more than the scientific study of humans. By asking ourselves, “what is anthropology?” and “what is culture?” we must understand what cultural anthropologists actually do in practice. A cultural anthropologist is someone who observes, records, and thinks about the operation, function, and design of human life in all of its complexities. Humanity, like culture, is messy, nonlinear, multifaceted, and constantly shifting. Think about the culture which your parents grew up, lots of things may have changed since then, including popular music, technology, medical advancements, and so on. The purpose of this course is to provide you with an introduction to the historical context, current manifestations, and theoretical processes of cultural anthropology as an academic discipline and as a way of viewing the world. We will accomplish this by exploring the similarities and diversity of human societies through ethnographic case studies and cross-cultural comparisons in both film and text. These topics are illustrated through examining the history and utility of anthropology's hallmark method, ethnography, which is the immersion of the researcher in the culture under study.

AN 351D • Language and Culture • 4 • Michael Ennis-McMillan
An examination of human language as a cultural phenomenon. Students learn basic concepts and techniques from anthropological linguistics to study the interrelationship of human thought, expression, and culture.  Using examples from diverse world regions, students use linguistic principles to compare patterns of communication in Western and non-Western settings. Topics include the structure of language, linguistic diversity, multilingualism and codeswitching, cultures of performance, and globalization of media.  We also analyze how the interdependence of language and power relates to race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality.  Students consider how to apply anthropological linguistics to promote language learning, including English language learning. Prior social science coursework is recommended.
Prerequisite: AN-101 or permission of instructor.

AR 101 • Intro to Painting • 3 • Angela Heisch • Lab Fee $60
An introduction to painting as a medium of visual expression. Emphasis is placed upon exploration of formal and technical concerns. Basic studies include drawing and will explore a variety of subject matter and media directed toward the organization of the two-dimensional plane.
Note(s): Summer only. Not open to Skidmore art majors.

AR 101Z • Intro to Painting Workshop • 0 •  Angela Heisch • Lab Fee $60
An introduction to painting as a medium of visual expression. Emphasis is placed upon exploration of formal and technical concerns. Basic studies include drawing and will explore a variety of subject matter and media directed toward the organization of the two-dimensional plane.
Note(s): Summer only. Not open to Skidmore art majors.

AR 133 • Drawing I • 4 • Kathy Hemingway-Jones • Lab Fee $50
This course builds on basic drawing experiences, refining skills in observation, organization, interpretation, and critical analysis. Studio work introduces a range of traditional drawing tools and materials while exploring a variety of approaches to image making and visual expression.

AR 133Z • Drawing Workshop • 0 • Kathy Hemingway-Jones • Lab Fee $50
This course builds on basic drawing experiences, refining skills in observation, organization, interpretation, and critical analysis. Studio work introduces a range of traditional drawing tools and materials while exploring a variety of approaches to image making and visual expression.

AR 136 • Digital Foundations • 4 • Joe Klockowski • Lab Fee $105
A survey of technological and aesthetic best practices and theory in visual communication. Students will study the basic functions and integral properties of Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, and other presentation and video editing software. Vector and raster imaging techniques, scanning, printing, and using digital images and typography are introduced through a series of demonstration/projects that build upon one another. Projects focus on design principles and basic skills needed to communicate a visual message with a specific intent.
Note(s): (Fulfills arts requirement.)

AR 264G • Special Topics in Photography: Landscape Photography • 4 • Emily Vallee • Lab Fee $80
This course is designed to explore the genre of landscape photography. Students will photograph the local landscape with DSLR cameras, experimenting with a variety of digital image making techniques. Through interaction with the land students will develop an environmental awareness. Emphasis will be placed on the creation of a cohesive body of work, in class critique, discussion of imagery and literature pertaining to contemporary landscape and developing a personal relationship to the land. Students should be familiar with the basics of digital photography as well as provide their own DSLR camera for course. Introductory Photoshop and Printing skills will be incorporated into class workflow. Students should have a basic understanding of DSLR cameras and must provide their own.

AR 264H • Special Topics in Studio Art Printing making: Experimental Etching & Intaglio • 4 • Sophie Isaak • Lab Fee $100
Experimental Etching and Intaglio is designed to cover the diverse image-making possibilities within the medium of intaglio. Beginning with line etching and hand work, students will develop their own visual language in tandem with the growth of their technical skills. Students will draw inspiration from both historic and contemporary prints, enhanced by visits to Special Collections and the Tang Museum’s print study room. In addition to basic etching methods, this course will cover advanced techniques, including various approaches to aquatint, shaped plates, multi-plate etching and color printing. Utilizing copper plates, students will chart their progress by printing many variations of their images, thus allowing them to marvel in the malleability of this historic medium.
Prerequisites: When appropriate, as advertised with course description.
Note(s):All courses are designed to meet 200-level requirements, and are open to students who have fulfilled the appropriate prerequisites. This course may be repeated once for credit provided that the topic is in a different discipline.

AR 243 • Digital Media I: Animation • 4 • Paris Baillie • Lab Fee $105
In this course students will learn to integrate traditional and modern techniques to expand and evolve their animation practice. In addition to using After Effects, students will create a range of projects that explore motion through frame-by-frame illustration, GIFs, and live-action video. There will be weekly in-class discussions, readings, screenings, and critiques. No digital experience is required.

AR 311 • Painting II • 4 • Jennifer Kemp • Lab Fee $50
A continuation of painting concepts explored in AR 201, designed to further acquaint students with technical processes, formal relationships, and conceptual issues. Structured assignments employing direct observation (including the figure) and invention provide a context for development of a personal vision. Other assignments will refer to historical and contemporary movements and painting methods with readings and discussions.
Prerequisite: AR 201.

AR 332 • Painting III • 4 • Jennifer Kemp • Lab fee $50
Further investigation of formal, expressive, and technical aspects of painting. This course emphasizes individual exploration of structured assignments, leading toward self-directed studio practice. Readings and discussions complement studio practice. Emphasis is placed upon more individual exploration of assigned formal problems in the studio.
Prerequisites: AR 225 or AR 311.
Note(s): May be taken for credit three times with permission of instructor.

AR 351H • Translations and Conversations: Printing with Artists • 4 • Patrick Casey • Lab Fee $100
This is a special opportunity for students to work with artists and a printmaker to participate in the creation of new prints by contemporary artists who has not made a print before.

Students will be involved in the collaborative process of choosing the printmaking method most suited to the artists’ work, and then helping create an edition of prints.

Students will also be expected to work on and complete prints of their own during the course. An intermediate course in printmaking will be a pre-requisite. Several types of printmaking will be available in the print shop, however, lithography and intaglio will not be.
Note (s): This course can also be taken for independent study or an internship credit.

AS 251C • The Story of Buddhism • 3 • Benjamin Bogin
An introductory survey of Buddhist traditions focusing on narrative literature and art. Students will examine the social and intellectual history of these traditions as they spread geographically and consider the role of narrative in contemporary Buddhist communities.
Note(s):
With the approval of the program, the course may be repeated for credit on a different topic.

BI 170 • Human Genetics • 4 • Bernard Possidente • Lab fee $80
An introduction to the principles of genetics and their application to human biology. Topics include the history of genetics; the structure, function, and inheritance of genes; medical genetics; and genetic engineering.
Note(s): Academic Year: Three hours of lecture, two hours of lab per week.
Summer: Nine hours of lecture, six hours of lab per week. (Fulfills natural sciences and QR2 requirements.)

CS 206 • Introduction to Computer Science II • 4 • Thomas O’Connell
Fundamentals of software development and algorithm design. Topics include recursion, data structures, analysis of algorithms, and program verification.
Prerequisites: CS 106 or CS 107 or permission of instructor.

EN 103 • Writing Seminar I • 4 • L. Caitlin Jorgensen
Introduction to expository writing with frequent writing assignments emphasizing skills in developing ideas, organizing material, and creating thesis statements. Assignments provide practice in description, definition, comparison and contrast, and argumentation. Additional focus on grammar, syntax, and usage.
Note(s): Students and instructor meet in seminar five days a week; students are also required to meet regularly with a Writing Center tutor. This course does not fulfill the all-college requirement in expository writing.

EN 105 • Writing Seminar II • 4 •  Paul Fogle
This seminar immerses students in the process of producing finished analytical essays informed by critical reading and careful reasoning. Special attention is given to developing ideas, writing from sources, organizing material, and revising drafts. Additional emphasis is on grammar, style, and formal conventions of writing. Students respond to one another’s work in workshops or peer critique sessions. Occasional informal writing complements assignments of longer finished papers.
Note(s):(This course fulfills the all-college requirement in expository writing.)

EN 105 • Writing Seminar II • 4 •  Thaddeus Niles
"Under the Influence - Argument and Persuasion in our Lives"

Argument seems inescapable. Its rituals have shaped the Western academic tradition, which is perhaps reason enough to study it more closely.  But argument is also a central feature of our lives as citizens and consumers. In this writing course, students will consider the nature of persuasion, various methods of thinking critically, and approaches to translating these methods to academic texts.  Class projects include essays examining the language and logic of persuasive appeals, as well as a final collaborative project.

GE 101 • Earth Systems Science • 4 • Kyle Nichols • Lab Fee: $50
An introduction to Earth’s dynamic systems and geologic processes. The planet is studied from its deep interior to its oceanic, surficial, and atmospheric components to develop a scientific understanding of Earth as a holistic environmental system, of which the biosphere, including humanity, is one component. Within this context, course topics such as rocks and minerals, mountain building, earthquakes, volcanoes, glaciers, surface and groundwater, and resources are examined from the perspective of the interactions between geologic processes and humans.
Prerequisite: QR1.
Note(s): Three hours of lecture, two hours of lab per week. (Fulfills QR2 requirement; qualifies as a natural science laboratory course for breadth requirement.)

GW 101 • Introduction to Gender Studies • 4 • Donnie Bellamy
An introduction to the origins, purpose, subject matters, and methods of the interdisciplinary study of gender. Students are expected to expand their knowledge of the relative historical and present social conditions of people of different genders in different contexts and to develop analytical skills for the examination of socially significant variables-race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality. Students will explore different and often opposing understandings of what constitutes feminism and feminist action. The class format will combine interactive lectures, reading assignments, discussion, formal research and writing assignments, and other student projects. Ideally, students will leave the class with an understanding of how gender structures cultural, political, economic, and social relations in various contexts.

MB 235 • Foundations of Managerial Accounting • 3 • Joseph Diamante
Effective use and interpretation of financial information. Students examine the use of accounting information by managers for planning, control, decision-making, budgeting, and strategy development. Students learn key management accounting concepts and techniques specific to manufacturing and service entities. Topics include product-costing methodologies, cost behavior, operational and capital budgeting, and performance evaluation.
Prerequisites: MB 234.
Note(s):(Fulfills QR2 requirement.)

MB 338 • Foundations of Finance • 4 • Aiwu Zhao
An examination of the fundamentals of business finance as influenced by political, cultural, economic, and physical environmental forces. Attention is given to the implications of entrepreneurial and international activities on financial activities. Students study the implications of entrepreneurial and international activities on financial decisions. Topics include an overview of the financial environment including investments, capital markets and institutions, corporate financial theory, asset pricing, financial analysis and planning, corporate capital structure and costs, and corporate investment decisions. This course covers the following dimensions for studying management and business in context: I, VI.
Prerequisites: MB 235, and EC 237 or MS 104 or MS 204 or PS 202 or SO 226.

MP 195 • Class Study of Jazz Piano • 2 • John Nazarenko
Study of jazz piano voicings, scales, and modes for improvisation. Left-hand chording patterns, harmonic structures, and accompanying scales will be emphasized. Other areas of study will include diatonic and chromatic voice leading, phrasing and solo development, functional harmony, bass lines, and solo jazz piano technique. Class will read selected jazz charts and listen to and analyze contemporary and historical jazz pianists.
Note(s): Not for liberal arts credit. (Fulfills arts requirement.)

NS 101 • Introductory Neuroscience: Mind and Behavior • 4 • Sarita Lagalwar
An interdisciplinary examination of the neurobiological bases of behavior and mental processing. Topics include the structure and functioning of the nervous system, brain-behavior relationships, and hormonal and genetic effects on behavior and mental processing. Laboratories develop students' understanding of functional neuroanatomy, neural transmission, and human neurophysiology.
Note(s): (Fulfills natural sciences breadth requirement.)

PS 101 • Introduction to Psychological Science • 4 • Elliot Jardin
An introduction to the science of psychology through a survey of theories, methods, and principles of behavior. Students will learn about empirical studies that are central to the various subdisciplines of psychology.

PY 109 • Sound and Music with Lab • 4 • Jill Linz
The physical principles of sound - how it is produced, propagated and perceived. Emphasis will be placed on music and music theory and will look at some of the mechanisms used to produce different types of musical sounds as well as the physical principles guiding the development of music theory throughout history. The weekly lab sessions will provide hands-on experience in understanding the physical principles discussed in lecture.  Featured article on Jill Linz American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).
Note(s): (Fulfills QR2 and natural sciences requirements.)

RE 103 • Understanding Religion • 4 • Eliza Kent
An in-depth introduction to the academic study of religion from a variety of perspectives, that attends to religion as a global, cross-cultural human phenomenon. Students will examine multiple traditions, geographical locations, and historical periods. Through close reading of texts, lecture, and discussion, students explore the religious lives of individuals and communities empathetically while also critically examining them within larger political, social, and cultural contexts.
Note(s): (Fulfills humanities requirement.)

SO 101 • Sociological Perspectives • 3 • Andrew Lindner
The basic concepts and principles of major sociological perspectives. Attention is given to how these perspectives have been developed and used by social scientists to explain social phenomena. Recommended as an introduction to the discipline.
Note(s): (Fulfills social sciences requirement.)

SW 253 • Human Behavior and the Social Environment • 3 • Peter McCarthyA multidisciplinary examination of theories and knowledge of human bio-psycho-social development from birth through later years. The course draws on research from biology, psychology, sociology, anthropology, and political science to study the impact of biological, psychological, social, and cultural systems on health and well-being. Students explore the range of social systems in which individuals live (families, groups, communities, and organizations) and study the importance of ethnicity, culture, gender, disability, and other elements of diversity in human development.

TH 304 • Special Studies in Actin: Theater Performance • 3 • Garett Wilson
Students will train with and perform with The Saratoga Shakespeare Company, a professional regional theater company engaging Equity actors. Students will be cast in roles in a production and will then perform in the production over a two-week period. Training will involve techniques in Shakespearean acting, stage movement and combat, vocal work and career preparation. Students are eligible to join the Actors' Equity EMC (Equity Membership Candidate) program and will accrue five points towards Equity membership.
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

TH 305F •  Design and Technical Theatre: Theater Performance • 3 • Garett Wilson 

WLI 101 • Elementary Italian  • 4 • Barbara Garbin
An introduction to spoken and written Italian emphasizing cultural perspectives. Linguistic emphasis is on basic grammar, vocabulary, and the development of reading, conversation, and writing skills while learning about the culture of Italy.  

 


 

Summer Session 3: June 1–August 7, 2020

Course # • Course Title • Credits • Instructor • Lab Fee (if any)

No courses offered.